Superhero Bits: Batman: Arkham Video Games May Be Over, Nicolas Cage Talks Superman & More

The Punisher - Jon Bernthal

How much did Spider-Man: Homecoming make in its opening weekend at the China box office? Which character did James Gunn say will not be making an appearance in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3? Will there be anymore Batman: Arkham video games in the near future? Would Kevin Conroy ever voice a Marvel character? What very Nicolas Cage-y thing did Nicolas Cage say about his abandoned Superman movie with Tim Burton? All that and more in this edition of Superhero Bits.

Last week shooting #newmutants

A post shared by Josh Boone (@joshboonemovies) on

Director Josh Boone shared this image from the set of The New Mutants, featuring the comic book title logo.

Arrow executive producer Wendy Mericle talked about Samandra Watson, an FBI agent debuting in season six.

Spider-Man Homecoming Chinese Poster

Spider-Man: Homecoming pulled in $ 70.2 million in its opening weekend in China, which is quite the debut.

Margot Robbie believes she’ll be playing Harley Quinn again in 2018, but she doesn’t know for which movie.

Here’s a sneak peek of the Wonder Woman gag reel coming on the home video release of the DC Comics movie.

Director James Gunn says fans shouldn’t expect to see Vance Astro appear in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3.

The Punisher - Deborah Ann Woll Ebon Moss-Bachrach - The Punisher

Netflix released a batch of new photos from Marvel’s The Punisher, as well as a poster, but still no release date yet.

Production on the Spider-Man spin-off Venom has been pushed nearly a month with a start date of October 23.

Continue Reading Superhero Bits>>

Due to the amount of graphics and images included in Superhero Bits, we have to split this post over THREE pages. Click the link above to continue to the next page of Superhero Bits.

The post Superhero Bits: Batman: Arkham Video Games May Be Over, Nicolas Cage Talks Superman & More appeared first on /Film.


/Film

‘Bojack Horseman’ Showrunner Talks Season 4 (and How Jessica Biel Asked Him to be Meaner) [Interview]

bojack horseman 3

“Where’s Bojack” is the mystery of Bojack Horseman’s fourth season, and also the feeling of fans who’ve been waiting since they binge-watched season 3 last summer. Last season featured the landmark episode “Fish Out of Water” in which Bojack (Will Arnett) attended an underwater film festival, featured Bojack finding out he had a long lost daughter, and introduced Mr. Peanutbutter’s (Paul F. Tompkins) plan to for office.

/Film has been pursuing Bojack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg for several years now, so we had a lot to talk about when we finally spoke by phone. We spoke vaguely about season 4, so that you could read this either before or after you watch the season, and discussed general questions that have been percolating about the show for four years.

Was it a big risk to introduce Bojack so late in season four?

It’s not that late. We did talk a lot about how much do we want to keep him hidden, and how much do we want to keep him not in L.A. There were talks of could he go half or most of the season up in Michigan or driving around going from place to place? We definitely considered that, but we also thought we teased the idea of his daughter character in the end of season three. That’s also a really rich story we want to get into and if he’s driving all around, we can’t really explore that relationship. For the benefit of that story, which we think ultimately is going to be a deeper, more interesting story than whatever he’s doing in these other places with these strangers, it makes sense to get him back to L.A. somewhat quickly but we cover a lot of time in those first episodes. In world, he’s been gone for a full year but the audience isn’t missing him too much. Did it feel like a risk to not have him in the first episode at all?

I was wondering how far you’d push it, but I was ready to spend that time with the other characters. 

I think it’s interesting too because I think a lot of the audience’s perception is going to be shaped by the marketing. We’re really pushing the “Where’s Bojack?” of it all. There might be some disappointment of, “Oh, I thought it was going to be the whole season.” Or it might end up helping it feel like more time because they’re already wondering now where’s Bojack. We’ll see. It felt like a fun thing to try, to have a show called Bojack Horseman and have no Bojack Horseman for an episode. Yeah, that’s the kind of thing we do. Let’s go for it.

bojack horseman 5

Did you already have the political story for Mr. Peanutbutter when you set up his campaign at the end of season three?

No. We didn’t know what we were going to do with it. We just thought, “Oh, that would be a fun thing to explore.” I think if we’d thought ahead for even a second, we might have predicted that maybe by 2017 people would be sick of following stories about politics and it won’t be the most enticing thing to do. I like to think we did a good enough job to make it feel fun and interesting and not feel like it’s rehashing a lot of the vitriol and torture of what the last 16 months have been. As we were working on the story, we tried to say okay, what if it’s less about politics and the personal relationships. What does this campaign do to Mr. Peanutbutter’s relationship with Diane and what does it say about him and his ex-wives?

It sort of fell into your lap that you had a candidate who never thought he’d actually get elected.

Right, but what I’ll say, while we were making the season, there was a lot of talk of where is this going? Do we want him to win or not and what does that say? I think that changed as stuff was happening in the real world. Is this funny or is it horrifying and what does that mean, what is the precedent for it? It shifted a little bit so I think we were very conscious not to too closely ape anything specific from the election. We didn’t want to just be like this is like this and this character is like that guy. Certainly I think what was happening in the world definitely seeped in because we’re humans and we have thoughts about the world and the way it work.

Did you always know the history of Mr. Peanutbutter’s House or was that all new this season?

No, sometimes what’s fun about this show is we’ll write stuff in as a throwaway gag and then we’ll return to it and go, “Okay, what does this actually say about the world?” The very first season of Bojack, you see a clip of Mr. Peanutbutter’s House. At the end, the credit pops up: Created by David Chase and Steven Bochco. We’re like oh, that’s a funny gag if those two guys wrote Mr. Peanutbutter’s House. So then when it was time to show the flashback to it, we were like, “Do you think we could get David Chase or Steven Bochco?” David Chase was like, “Yeah, I’ll do it.” It was a really fun way to start the season I thought. A lot of the backstory of these characters we’re finding as we go which is fun. We’re making the story forwards as well as backwards. This season there’s a lot of backstory, especially with Bojack’s family. That was really fun to dive into, stuff we’ve hinted at before or intimated before. I was like, let’s really explore that and what was that and how did that work?

Is episode 11 this season’s “Fish Out of Water?”

I don’t know. I guess that’s for the audience to decide. I don’t necessarily think of it that way. When we go into every season, we’re not necessarily trying to top ourselves or match certain things, like okay, we’ve got to have this kind of episode and that kind of episode and this kind of episode. It really is more like what sounds fun for us this year? I’m always excited to see which episodes pop with the audience. It’s not always the episodes that I expect to so it’s fun. I’m excited to see what people think about all of the episodes.

bojack horseman 6

You address that Margo Martindale is still lost at sea. Didn’t all the spaghetti strainers catch her?

No. She’s still missing and presumed dead perhaps.

Even though Sarah Lynn is gone, was it important that her catchphrase (“Suck a d***, dumb sh*ts”) still lives?

Yeah, that felt like a nice way to pay tribute.

It’s my favorite thing to say.

Good. Well, be careful who you say it around.

When Bojack meets Eddie, was that a nice chance to introduce a tragic character for a single episode arc?

Yeah, that was really fun. We talked about who does Bojack meet and in what ways is this character a reflection of what Bojack has gone through? Even though his backstory is very different and distinct, can Bojack see in him a model for what he would like to be and/or not like to be. We thought he made a really interesting foil for Bojack in that moment. Colman Domingo’s an amazing actor we were lucky to get, and to have him sing is pretty incredible. He’s a Broadway star which a lot of people don’t even know about him. They’ve just seen him on Fear the Walking Dead. That was really cool for me. I was like, “I saw you on Broadway in Passing Strange and now we wrote this song for you to sing.”

Was Lin-Manuel Miranda a Bojack fan?

I don’t know if he was a fan, but we asked him to do the show and he said yet. Either he was a fan or his agent thought it’d be good for his career. He was also very sweet, very friendly. One of our writers is a huge Lin-Manuel Miranda fan so Lin-Manuel recorded a little message for them which was really nice.

There’s a joke in the finale about a Matthew Perry SNL sketch that’s really poignant. I won’t give away the joke but did it take a long time to figure out how to describe a sketch we don’t see? 

It actually came from a very old bit I had way back in college from my own sketch comedy group. I was trying to write the finale and I was stuck on this one scene. I couldn’t figure out how to move from one thing to the other. So of course I was procrastinating. When I write, I try to turn my internet off so I can’t procrastinate through the internet, but then I just get deeply involved in whatever I have just on my computer. So I was going through old documents and pictures and looking at stuff just so I wouldn’t have to think about the episode. Then I found this joke that I thought, “Oh, I bet I can do something with this.” So it turned out my procrastination helped me unlock a piece of the puzzle.

Continue Reading Bojack Horseman Showrunner Interview >>

The post ‘Bojack Horseman’ Showrunner Talks Season 4 (and How Jessica Biel Asked Him to be Meaner) [Interview] appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Cate Blanchett in Talks for The House with a Clock in Its Walls

Cate Blanchett is in early talks to join Jack Black in The House with a Clock in Its Walls

Cate Blanchett is in early talks to join Jack Black in The House with a Clock in Its Walls

Cate Blanchett is in early talks to join Jack Black in The House with a Clock in Its Walls, according to Variety. The Amblin Entertainment and Mythology Entertainment film is based on the 1973 novel of the same name by John Bellairs, and illustrated by Edward Gorey. Eli Roth will direct the film from a script from Eric Kripke.

RELATED: Amazon Studios acquires Lucy and Desi with Cate Blanchett set to star as Lucille Ball

The House with a Clock in Its Walls, which is book one of Bellairs’ Lewis Barnavlet series, is described on the late author’s official site as follows:

Lewis had always wanted to live in a house like Uncle Jonathan’s — full of marble fireplaces and secret passageways and dozens of unused, unexplored rooms. And living with Uncle Jonathan, a real wizard, was full of fun and surprises.

But while Uncle Jonathan practiced funny and comfortable white magic, the original owner of the old house, Isaac Izard, had been an evil sorcerer. Isaac Izard had devised a plan for bringing about the end of the world. Somewhere in the walls of the house he had hidden a clock. Every night Lewis and Uncle Jonathan could hear it ticking — sometimes loud, sometimes soft — marking off the minutes until doomsday.

Lewis knew they had to find the clock before it was too late. Then he decided to dabble in a litte magic of his own, and their time almost ran out.

Kripke, Brad Fischer and James Vanderbilt will produce and William Sherak, Tracey Nyberg and Laeta Kalogridis will executive produce.

What do you guys think of a film based on The House with a Clock in Its Walls? Let us know @ComingSoonnet.

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)

The post Cate Blanchett in Talks for The House with a Clock in Its Walls appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

CS Interview: Jeff Bridges Talks Only Living Boy in New York

CS Interview: Jeff Bridges Talks Only Living Boy in New York

CS Interview: Jeff Bridges talks Only Living Boy in New York

ComingSoon.net had a chance to chat with Oscar-winning legend Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart, The Big Lebowski) about his new romantic comedy The Only Living Boy in New York, in which he plays an eccentric New Yorker. We also discussed his work in films like Tucker, Tideland, Starman and the upcoming Kingsman: The Golden Circle, as well as a potential new sequel to The Last Picture Show!

Amazon and Roadside Attractions’ comedy/drama The Only Living Boy in New York also stars Callum Turner (Green Room), Kate Beckinsale (Underworld), Pierce Brosnan (Goldeneye), Cynthia Nixon (Sex in the City), and Kiersey Clemons (Dope). It follows a recent college graduate adrift in New York City who seeks the guidance of an eccentric neighbor as his life is upended by his father’s mistress.

Directed by Marc Webb (The Amazing Spider-Man, Gifted) from a screenplay by Allan Loeb (The Space Between UsJust Go with It), The Only Living Boy in New York is now playing in select theaters.

ComingSoon.net: You took an executive producer credit on “Only Living Boy in New York.” What did that entail besides your usual skills as an actor?

Jeff Bridges: I got to be in on the decisions of the shoot and the style of the film. And I got to put in my views, and put in my vote for [lead Callum Turner] who was wonderful for the part really. He did justice for the story beautifully, I can tell you that.

CS: What was something specifically that sparked for you when you saw his tape or his audition?

Bridges: His acting! It was very real.

only-living-boy-in-new-york-turner-bridges1

CS: Yeah, for sure. And speaking of your character, W.F., I don’t want to spoil it for our readers because there is sort of a twist. How did you walk the line performance-wise so you didn’t tip the audience off?

Bridges: Well, you’ve seen the movie – and I love going to movies myself but I try to know as little as I can about movies that I want to see so I get to experience it fresh like the filmmaker intended. And that was how Mark [Webb, the director] and Allan [Loeb] the screenwriter did this. And there’s a wonderful device in the movie where you are wondering because my character is kind of mysterious. I love that the audience finds out that I’m [*redacted for spoilers*]. And so that satisfies the audience’s sense of mystery of who this guy is. That sort of put the kibosh on the surprise, but it is largely due to the fact that you think you discover the surprise.

CS: This movie is very much the kind of movie that Woody Allen and others used to do about Upper West Side, New York literati. Nowadays not only is that world sort of disappearing, but books in general seem to be disappearing as well. Do you think that is accurate?

Bridges: Yeah! It’s a sad thing that bookstores are disappearing. But it’s just inevitable that things change and nothing is permanent. It’s always changing, but you’re always nostalgic for the way it was. But when it changes there’s nothing we can do about that.

CS: Unfortunately not. One of the legendary bookstores still left in the city is The Argosy, which they show a lot of in this movie. Can you speak a little bit to your own relationship which books and maybe which authors had the biggest impact on you?

Bridges: Well the best part of going into bookstores is just being there for hours. Just looking around for books. And one of my favorite movies that I was in that did wonderful things for my career was “The Last Picture Show.” It was written by McMurtry, who was one of the best screenwriters as well writers of fiction and historical fiction. And it was such a wonderful book and I’m hoping that I get to continue the McMurtry saga of my character Duane. There are three more books in that series where “The Last Picture Show” was the first one.

CS: And then “Texasville.”

Bridges: “Texasville,” and then there’s two other books, so I’m hoping those work out.

CS: Are you actually in active development on that?

Bridges: Well, I wouldn’t say active development. I’m having dinner with Peter Bogdanovich tomorrow night so I’m sure we’ll talk about it, we always do. Maybe we can it get fired up. You know, it’s hard to get movies made! Our writer Allan [Loeb] was about to shift careers if this movie didn’t sell. And he had been trying to work with a director to sell the script for 10 years! So it is a tough road.

lps-kids

CS: I remember when this script was on the Black List and this was considered a hot property. I remember when he was considered a hot writer and now he’s a veteran, but, this movie was written when he was much younger, and that brings up an interesting point actually. You have been doing this for a bit; this is not your first rodeo, you have read a bunch of scripts. What do you think is the biggest difference between the writing of an old pro and the writing of a hungry young writer?

Bridges: I don’t think there really is much difference. They can both be open and fresh. For my tastes in all of the arts, the most advanced artists have a freshness where it seems like it’s happening for the first time. When it seems like it’s happening for the first time, you think Picasso or something like that with the big things that you haven’t heard of before. And great writers have that, or you can have “psychic” powers where you could touch what hasn’t been touched before. I don’t know, but if you look at directors who had some wonderful success, especially with first-time directors, I don’t think it gets much better than “Citizen Kane.” Like, how old was Orson Welles when he made that? 25? So it goes the same with arts and artists across the board, the freshness and things like Sidney Lumet’s movies. I got to work with him too, where his later movies were just as fresh as ever.

CS: So if you do get to do the third “Last Picture Show” movie, is the plan to bring everybody back with Tim Bottoms, Cybill Shepherd and Randy Quaid?

Bridges: Sure, if we’re still alive.

CS: Well that would certainly be awesome. I think that what was cool about “The Last Picture Show” is that even when Peter did that movie, it was more of an old-school type of movie. That was during the era of “Easy Rider” and all these other counterculture things and he was doing a kind of throwback.

Bridges: To me, that movie kind of sits by itself. I can kind of see that he had these other peers, but it was made in a time where these kinds of movies weren’t being made and it kind of sits by itself in its own funny way to me.

CS: Yeah and I think now we are entering an era where movies like “Only Living Boy” and “Last Picture Show” are only becoming rarer and rarer when there are less movies about people and more about guys in super suits.

Bridges: But yeah I think we’re going to see more of these types of movies being made – Amazon is a good thing and I think that they’re planning on making more low-budget movies and not ones with $ 300 million budgets. More low-budget movies, I think, are more enjoyable to see.

CS: Yeah, do you they think they would be a good fit for “Last Picture 3”?

Bridges: Yes, that would be wonderful. Have you read those other books?

CS: No, I haven’t.

Bridges: Cool, if you’re a fan of McMurtry, they’re really very terrific stories.

CS: He was one of the best for sure. One of my favorite movies of yours that I don’t really hear talked about much is “Tucker: The Man and His Dream.” The themes of “the innovator versus the forces of Industry” are so powerful and still horribly relevant.

Bridges: You don’t say.

n-francis-ford-coppola-tucker-the-man-and-his-dreams-3017-3

CS: Can you talk a little bit about that movie and also about working with the late Martin Landau?

Bridges: Yeah gosh, I have such fond memories making that movie. My father also was working on that movie. We made a couple of films and it was one of the times I got to work with him as an adult so that was wonderful. And Francis [Ford Coppola], gosh, what working with him was like. What an amazing artist he is. He got me going on that movie. I can talk for hours about how innovative he was, what he did. Martin Landau and I became close with him on that film, he was such a wonderful actor and such a generous person. And Francis, one of the things he did for our relationship in the movie is he said, “How do you think you guys met?” We talked and created this story about how we met on the train, he was an old man and I bummed a cigarette off him, and we started up a conversation or whatever. And then Francis said, “Why don’t we start up an improv of that meeting right now.” And we were going on for about five or ten minutes and he set up chairs for us to use as the train. We did the improv and Francis said, “We won’t do it anymore, it will be just that one time, but now that’s in your brain I don’t have to make up how you did it. You’ve got that story actually in your brain, it really happened.” And that’s an example of what Francis did which brought us a little bit closer together. You know, playing our parts getting to know each other better.

CS: What is interesting for me about that movie is that Martin had been in the weeds career-wise for awhile and that movie very much brought him back. After that he did “Crimes and Misdemeanors,” “Ed Wood” got an Oscar, all that good stuff. You think he knew that that part was a turning point for him?

Bridges: Yes, I think he did know.

CS: I also want to talk to you about a film of yours that I don’t think gets enough ink, which is “Tideland.” That’s a doozy that movie. I’m a huge Terry Gilliam fan and I loved the book the movie was based on, but I think it is a challenging movie for even some of the more hardcore Gilliam people. Are you a fan of that film?

Bridges: I am, it’s probably the weirdest movie I ever got involved with. I must say it’s also the weirdest one of Terry’s, I would think.

CS: Which is saying something.

Bridges: It was so bizarre, but I had a ball doing it. And Terry is a huge master of sublimity. He’s been working on that “Quixote” movie for God knows how many years.

CS: I remember when you narrated the documentary.

Bridges: You are right about that!

CS: But “Tideland” definitely has some people who are passionate about it like me. What do you think made audiences react so violently to it when it came out come?

Bridges: Well, there is this little girl who starts shooting up her dad… starts shoving doll hairs up her father’s carcass. (laughs)

CS: It was a little too much for people, but I love you in it and I love that movie.

Bridges: It was also where I got to sing a song by my friend in the opening scene, and it always puts a smile on my face.

Jeff Bridges i Kingsman- The Golden Circle

CS: I was also lucky enough to get to see the first 30 minutes of “Kingsman: Golden Circle.” It’s very wild stuff, but I think I did not actually get to see any part of your scenes with the Statesman. I was curious, what excited you about doing that project?

Bridges: Well I was a big fan of the first one. It was the best spy-genre-James-Bond-type film that I’ve ever seen. It was executed so brilliantly by Matthew Vaughn, and they do all the special effects now and used them in a really brilliant way like the first one. And when I got invited to be a part of this one — which they never really like to call it a sequel, they always want to call it an extension of the first story — I said “Okay, let’s go.” And I play the head of an organization called the Statesman, which is the American version of the Kingsman.

CS: Yeah, you are with Channing Tatum and all that. It was just interesting to me that you chose that because outside of “TRON” and I guess “Texasville,” I don’t really see you as a big franchise guy. Was it something that you tried to avoid in your career?

Bridges: No, no, I mean, I was in the first “Iron Man” which was a franchise.

CS: True.

Bridges: Also, doing the “TRON” movie was big, but I am game for all of the different formats, you know. I guess I’ll probably do virtual reality when it comes up. The question is if theaters will be taken away soon, will we all be watching movies on our iPhones?

starman

CS: If you were to go over your entire filmography and make a sequel to any one of the movies you’ve done, which one would you want to revisit the most?

Bridges: I was kind of surprised that they never did one for “Starman” because it was all set up for one. Karen Allen is pregnant with the “Star Baby” and there’s a silver ball with the kid. Whenever I see Karen, we always jam about different ideas for a sequel.

CS: Like where did her character go? Where is her kid?

Bridges: I heard that there were talks for making a remake, but I still think that they should have made a sequel and stuff.

CS: That movie was always fascinating, because I am a big John Carpenter fan, and that was one of the only movies he got to make that really showed his breadth, that he wasn’t just a horror filmmaker.

Bridges: Yeah, I think so too.

CS: He had this really great facility with comedy – it was rather Howard Hawksian in that way with the romance there. Do you have any other memories of working with him?

Bridges: Yeah, he was terrific. I remember, I always had these ideas, and I would come up to him with my ideas and then he would look at me sometimes with an implacable expression on his face and he would say, “Yeah, but what do you know?” (laughs)

The post CS Interview: Jeff Bridges Talks Only Living Boy in New York appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

‘Rogue One’ Star Riz Ahmed in Talks for ‘Venom’ Spin-Off, May or May Not Be Carnage

Riz Ahmed - Carnage - Venom Cast

Sony Pictures is getting their Spider-Man franchise spin-off Venom ready to go. Tom Hardy has been attached to the project as the title character for some time now, and Gangster Squad director Ruben Fleischer will be behind the camera for the film that is said to have no ties to the Spider-Man played by Tom Holland in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Now the supporting cast is starting to fill out.

Reports have indicated that Rogue One: A Star Wars Story actor Riz Ahmed is in talks to play a popular Marvel Comics character in Venom. While the character isn’t being disclosed at this time, there is word on which character it won’t be. Find out more about Venom cast addition below.

Variety was the first to report on the Venom cast looking to recruit Riz Ahmed. While their reports doesn’t mention which character he would play if a deal comes together, The Hollywood Reporter has heard from sources that it won’t be Carnage, even though that’s the role in the film that Sony Pictures has been looking to cast. Carnage was supposed to be the villain and Riz Ahmed is said to have been considered for the role, but the script has changed since then and now he’s reportedly up for a different role.

Meanwhile, Jeff Sneider from The Tracking Board says his sources are torn as to what role Riz Ahmed would play, with one trustworthy source saying it will be Carnage. So it sounds like it could go either way.

Reporter Justin Kroll at Variety indicated on Twitter that Matt Smith (Doctor Who), Pedro Pascal (Game of Thrones) and Mathias Schoenarts (The Danish Girl) were also in the running for the role, so if Riz Ahmed somehow isn’t able to make it through negotiations, the studio does have other options at their disposal. Unfortunately, none of those options give us an idea as to who the character they could have played will be if it’s not actually Carnage.

Considering that Spider-Man: Homecoming has already used Vulture and Shocker, not to mention hinting at Scorpion, maybe Venom will venture into different villain territory by bringing someone like Kraven the Hunter or Mysterio into play (especially since there are spin-offs for those characters in the works). Or maybe they’ll dig deep into sci-fi Spider-Man territory by bringing Scarlet Spider into the mix, who is actually a clone of Spider-Man. That sounds pretty far fetched, but Venom is supposed to be a straight-up sci-fi movie, and potentially R-rated, so maybe it’s not too crazy.

Very little is known about Venom at this point, but the script is being written by Scott Rosenberg (Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle) and Jeff Pinkner (The Dark Tower), with Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach producing the movie along with Sony’s Amy Pascal.

As of now Venom is slated to arrive in theaters on October 5, 2018.

The post ‘Rogue One’ Star Riz Ahmed in Talks for ‘Venom’ Spin-Off, May or May Not Be Carnage appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Stephen King Talks The Dark Tower, Plus a Tour of King’s Maine

Stephen King Talks The Dark Tower, Plus a Tour of King's Maine

Stephen King talks to us about The Dark Tower

It’s been nearly 40 years since “The Gunslinger,” the first story in Stephen King’s magnum opus “The Dark Tower,” was first published. Now the saga of Roland, Jake Chambers and The Man in Black has come to life on the big screen this weekend in Sony PicturesThe Dark Tower, starring Idris Elba as Roland (the last gunslinger) and Matthew McConaughey as Walter (The Man in Black). We had the opportunity to take a tour of King’s hometown of Bangor, Maine where we saw sites that inspired (and were inspired by) King’s work, and then got to sit down and talk to the man himself. You’ll find the interview below the tour gallery!

 

ComingSoon.net: Did you ever think this would happen?

Stephen King: I never really thought about it that much. I mean, there were times when people would express an interest in it and then they’d go away again. Interest came back over time after Peter Jackson’s success with the “Lord of the Rings” movies. It never seemed like a “movie movie” idea as complex and long as it is. They’ve done a wonderful job here of telling a story that’s coherent and has all the elements of the novel “The Dark Tower.” The purists may not like it. I can’t tell about that for sure, because it doesn’t start where the books start, but at the same time, I could follow it anyway because I knew exactly what’s going on. I don’t think about that, I think about writing the next book. I’m more interested in the next thing than the last thing.

CS: Having seen the movie the other day it was kind of like the whole “Dark Tower” series thrown into a blender. Is it like being able to look at the series through fresh eyes for you?

King: Yeah. It is. And there’s so many things in the various stories, the plots are fairly complex and the characters interact and they go back and forth. I think that Akiva Goldsman, who wrote the screenplay, picked out what seemed to him to be the most accessible and human relationship kind of thing between this old guy, Roland, who’s been around for a long, long time, and the kid. And they had a wonderful chemistry when they were doing the show. And it comes through on the screen. So yeah, I mean, they had to make some decisions. Some of those decisions are related to telling a story that the general public will get, not just the the hardcore “Dark Tower” fans, the guys who show up at the fantasy conventions with Roland tattooed on their heads, something like that. So they want to get to those. You have to keep in mind that of all the books that are written, the fans of the “Dark Tower” books are the most zealous, the most fervent fans of all. But they make a small subgroup of the people who read books like “The Shining” or “Misery” or that sort of thing. So you know, they’re an acquired taste. They’re fantasy.

Roland (Idris Elba) in Columbia Pictures' THE DARK TOWER.

CS: I hate to ask you, because the film actually got negative feedback when Idris Elba was cast as Roland, what do you say to those people and what’s your response to the casting of the two primary leads?

King: Well, what I said in a tweet after all that discussion started was I didn’t care what color he was, as long as he could command the screen, draw fast and shoot straight. So it doesn’t make any difference to me, because I don’t even really see people when I’m writing because if I’m writing about a character, I’m behind their eyes, you know? Unless they walk by a mirror or something, I don’t even really see what they look like. But what really sort of made it an issue in my mind, when they cast Idris as Roland was, all of those books were illustrated to start with, those Grant novels were all illustrated. And in all those pictures, Roland is a white guy, and I never thought about that one way or another. But obviously, that became part of the mindset. But you know, it’s weird, isn’t it? Why shouldn’t he be black? Why couldn’t he be a black guy to do this? It’s like, you know what’s weirder than that? You see this show “Game of Thrones” and Westeros, they’re all British. They’re all British. I mean, Westeros is basically England, right? And nobody ever questions that. So I mean, to me, the idea that a black man would play Roland is minor compared to that.

CS: Do you hope he has a hat in the next movie?

King: It’s funny, isn’t it? Trade secret, in a lot of the pictures, not only is he white, he’s wearing a hat in most of those pictures. And I talked to the producers of the movie about that. And they said that in Western movies where the main character wears a hat don’t do well at the box office. And I said, “Really? Well, Denzel wore a hat all the way through ‘The Magnificent Seven.’ And that did pretty good at the box office.” But they don’t pay attention to that.

CS: A lot of this movie takes place on Keystone Earth, so it would be kind of silly if he was walking around New York looking like Crocodile Dundee.

King: Oh, I don’t know. I mean, have you been to New York lately? (laughs) I mean, they have a guy in Times Square that’s called the Naked Cowboy.

CS: Do you think you’ll ever go back to this world, fill in more of Roland’s backstory, write another “Dark Tower” book?

King: I’ve thought a lot about those characters in the last year or so, because they were making this movie. Actually, the last two or three years, because I had a lot of meetings with Ron Howard, who’s one of the producers and was very instrumental in bringing it to the screen. So I thought about them a lot then. I thought about them again when I did the “The Wind Through the Keyhole,” which was kind of a postscript to the books. And the funny thing about it is, I’m usually all about the next thing. And that’s why, you know, somebody was asking me at dinner, “Are you all bound up in the success or failure of this movie and the other movie?” And the answer is, no. The books are there. The books are done. And that’s sort of where my focus is. But when you do come back to them, like I don’t know. I wrote “The Gunslinger” around 1970, and years went by. I mean, it was after “Pet Sematary” that I wrote the second one, because people asked for it. And then, a couple of more years later, the third one. And then, there was a long stall out.

darktower

CS: I remember.

King: And what I’m getting back to is every time that I came back, it was like meeting old friends, you know? And I picked up the story immediately and that was great. And I felt the same way. This is a plug for a wonderful TV series called “Mr. Mercedes” that’s going to start in about a week on DIRECTV Network. And you know, I wrote that book and there was this minor character whose name was Holly Gibney, who was at a funeral and Bill Hodges was supposed to comfort her. Bill Hodges is a cop. And she just walked in and stole a book. And sometimes, that happens with characters.

CS: Your character kind of admits in the sixth book you, yourself, that you lost an outline. Is that an actual story, is that a true story?

King: Yeah.

CS: You had a long outline for this?

King: I had an outline. It wasn’t particularly long, but it outlined the entire book, you know, the entire cycle of the books. And I did lose that. The only thing I can remember about it is it was written on a typewriter in the campus newspaper office at the University of Maine. It was one of these things that was built to receive teletype as well as type. So it had all capital letters. So I remember the outline, but I don’t know where it went. I don’t even know where the first draft of that book went.

CS: We were touring around today seeing all the sites that had inspired you. What inspires you these days? Has your response to fear or the things that draw fear out of you changed over the decades?

King: I don’t think so, a little bit. I don’t think that I’m as close to the childhood monsters and things that I was close to in my 20s and 30s. It’s just a natural thing. You know, you’re closer to your childhood. You remember more of what your childhood — and then, you get this double dip because you have kids of your own and you see what they’re seeing and you’re close to them and you have them almost as research subjects, you know, kid things, you’re watching what they’re doing all the time. I don’t know. There are things that I’m interested in, but there’s no way to generalize the case exactly. I see pictures sometimes in my mind. You know, it’s like I see dead people. And sometimes I do. But then I think I would like to write a story about that, find out what it’s about. I think that in the last few years, I’ve written more about old people. I’m not sure that’s the demographic I really want to go after because they’re shrinking all the time. But you know, you write what you know. When you’re young, you write about young people.

CS: Is there anything that didn’t make it into the movie that you wish had?

King: Well, there are things I think that the hardcore fans are going to wish were in the movie. And all I can say is that if the movie’s a success, there will be a sequel. I would love to see those doors into our world. And there is some of that in this movie. I would love to see Roland on the beach with those lobster monstrosities and stuff. I understand the rationale behind the movie that’s PG-13, and I was totally signed off on that. I think it’s the right thing to do. I want as many people in the tent as possible for all kinds of reasons. Part of it, having to do with the dynamic between the gunslinger and the boy, because I think that’s a father/son relationship. I’d love to see the next picture be R because I think that’s sort of where we’re coming from now, where the movies need to go. For a long time, PG-13 was the safe spot to go. And when pictures were R, the studio executives would say, “Well, we know that this is going to make 20 percent and 30 percent less money because we’re going to exclude a market, a prime part of the movie going public.” I think that movies like “Deadpool” and “Logan” changed that to some degree.

DGL2wX9UwAAkDJF

CS: Do you think it would be strange if they didn’t do “Drawing of the Three” in some way, shape or form next?

King: I think that would probably happen, yeah. I think that would be the logical place to go. I had to think about it in my mind. Like I said, I’m not into that part of it, the creative part.

CS: And in terms of your personal accomplishments, how high do you rank getting blocked by Trump on Twitter?

King: Not very high. Not very high. Getting blocked by Donald Trump on Twitter is a little bit like striking out the pitcher. I thought it demonstrated a sort of, I don’t know, I just think of a little kid with his little lip all the way pushed down, you know, it’s a childish thing to be done.

CS: Well, I thought it was pretty cool.

King: Not that you can’t. You know, thank you. I got a lot of good ink for that, actually. Go me.

CS: They managed to fit in your famous opening line, “The Man in Black fled across the desert and the gunslinger followed.” Were you happy with the way it’s incorporated into the film?

King: Yeah. I am. I was after them from the beginning to get that line in there. Not for me, but for the people who quoted it and stuff. It’s strange to me, but that line has become important to people, because when I wrote it it was just a line. It was a way into the story.

CS: It’s just this treasure trove in your mind. You’re so prolific and you’ve written so much. Where does that keep renewing itself from?

King: I don’t think it does. I think you get a finite number of stories, and when I was, let’s say 25 or 26, it was like people trying to escape a burning building. Inside my head, there were all these ideas that were crammed together, and I wanted to write them all at once. And now, I have less, but I’m grateful to have any, so that’s good. I’m working now, and that’s all I need. It’s a good thing. And I have a few ideas. I don’t know if they’re very good, but they’re ideas.

CS: Can you talk about what you’re working on now?

King: No. There’s a book done for next year and there’s a book that I wrote with my son called “Sleeping Beauties” that’s out next month. And he and I are going to go on tour. It’s nice to be able to write a book with your son. He told me what to do and I did it. This is a preview of the old folk’s home.

The Dark Tower is now playing in theaters everywhere.

The_Gunslinger__1988_trade_paperback_

The post Stephen King Talks The Dark Tower, Plus a Tour of King’s Maine appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

James Gunn Talks Guardians 3 Title and Completing the Trilogy

James Gunn Talks Guardians 3 Title and Completing the Trilogy

James Gunn talks Guardians 3 title and completing the trilogy

Marvel StudiosGuardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is coming home to Digital HD on August 8, followed by the DVD, Blu-ray and 4K Ultra HD on August 22. In anticipation of the release, writer/director James Gunn spoke to Collider about the Guardians 3 title and completing the trilogy begun in 2014.

Gunn noted that production on Guardians 3 would begin in “a little more than year,” and that they do have a release date locked in. He also confirmed that the third film will “probably” be called Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3, as expected, and may feature the original team of Ravagers led by Sylvester Stallone’s Stakar (a.k.a. Starhawk).

“It’s been pretty easy,” Gunn said of the scripting process. “The truth is, the first movie is the first act, the second movie is the second act, and the third movie is the third act so I’m tying a lot of stuff together in the third film. We get a lot of answers on a lot of different things, so doing that in an elegant way takes a little bit of grace and elegance. It’s more challenging in that respect writing the third movie than the second movie. I do an incredibly in-depth treatment for every movie. I think of writing a screenplay as creating the body of a human being and you’ve got to start with the skeleton, start with the bones, and you create the bones. You take a lot of time because that’s the actual base of the movie and if you screw that part up, later on down the line, you’re going to have a lot of mistakes. So by creating a really strong foundation for the story, that’s the most important thing. So I write a good treatment that’s probably about 70 pages long. It includes photographs and things like that. So that has been the way I’ve dealt with every movie and this one as well.”

Click here to pre-order Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 on Digital HD!

Bonus features include:

Blu-ray:

  • The Making of “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” – A four-part, behind-the-scenes look at the making of the film, done in the style of classic-rock album liner notes.
  • Visionary Intro – Director James Gunn provides context on how he continues and expands the storylines of these beloved characters in “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.”
  • Guardians Inferno Music Video – Join David Hasselhoff and special guests for a galactic retro dance party.
  • Gag Reel – Laugh out loud at all the hilarious off-script shenanigans and bloopers that took place on the set of “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” featuring all your favorite Guardians.
  • Four Deleted Scenes – Check out four specific scenes that had to be cut from the film, including two extended scenes and two deleted scenes.
  • Audio Commentary – Check out a special narration of the film by director James Gunn, who guides fans through an inside look at the making of the movie.

Digital all the features listed above plus four extra exclusives:

  • Three Scene Breakdowns (Digital Exclusives) – We’ll reveal the anatomy of a few key scenes from the film. Discover the process in bringing these scenes to life. It starts with a doodle and the rest is film history. Audiences will be given the option to view 5-6 layers of specific scenes in the film. Scenes include “Eclector Escape,” “Gamora and Nebula,” and “Rocket and Ravagers.”
  • Guardians of the Galaxy – Mission: Breakout! (Digital Exclusive) – Get an exclusive sneak peek inside the most anticipated ride at Disneyland,
  • Guardians of the Galaxy – Mission: Breakout!. We’ll dig into the concepts and inspiration, and talk about what it took to bring the most epic ride at Disneyland to life.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 stars Chris Pratt as Peter Quill (aka Star-Lord), Zoe Saldana as Gamora, Dave Bautista as Drax, Vin Diesel as the voice of Groot, Bradley Cooper as the voice of Rocket, Michael Rooker as Yondu and Sean Gunn as Kraglin. New cast members include Pom Klementieff, who plays Mantis, Elizabeth Debicki as Aesha, Chris Sullivan as Taserface and Kurt Russell as Ego, the Living Planet.

Set to the backdrop of Awesome Mixtape #2, the Guardians of the Galaxy sequel continues the team’s adventures as they traverse the outer reaches of the cosmos. The Guardians must fight to keep their newfound family together as they unravel the mysteries of Peter Quill’s true parentage.

Directed and written by James GunnGuardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 was produced by Marvel Studios’ president, Kevin Feige, with Louis D’Esposito, Victoria Alonso, Jonathan Schwartz, Nik Korda and Stan Lee serving as executive producers.

The post James Gunn Talks Guardians 3 Title and Completing the Trilogy appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

Kristen Bell and Kelsey Grammer in Talks for Like Father at Netflix

Kristen Bell and Kelsey Grammer in Talks for Like Father at Netflix

Kristen Bell and Kelsey Grammer are in talks for the Netflix comedy feature Like Father

Kristen Bell (The Good PlaceVeronica Mars) and Kelsey Grammer (CheersThe Last Tycoon) are in talks for the upcoming Netflix comedy feature Like Father, according to THR. The film will mark the directorial debut of Lauren Miller Rogan, who co-wrote and starred in the indie comedy For a Good Time Call. The production is set to begin shooting in August in New York, and is reportedly going to shoot in the Caribbean as well. Molly Conners (Birdman), Anders Bard (I Love You, Man) and Amanda Bowers (Manglehorn) will produce alongside Miller Rogan.

Like Father is about a workaholic woman who’s groom leaves her at the alter. She goes on the honeymoon cruise anyway and meets up with her workaholic father who left the family when his daughter was five to focus on his career. Bell and Grammer are reportedly in talks to play the father and daughter.

Kristen Bell is known for playing the lead role in the cult hit Veronica Mars from 2004-2007, as well as the 2014 film. She was the voice of Princess Anna in the Disney film Frozen as well as Frozen Fever and Olaf’s Frozen Adventure. She’s also appeared in films like Couple’s RetreatWhen In RomeBad Moms and You Again. She played Jeannie van der Hooven in the Showtime series House of Lies and will be seen next in the film A Bad Moms Christmas, which opens on November 3.

Kelsey Grammer played the role of Dr. Frasier Crane on the TV series Cheers and it’s successful spinoff Frasier, for which he received a number of Primetime Emmy Awards. He voices the role of Sideshow Bob in The Simpsons and recently appeared in Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising. Grammer stars on the Amazon series The Last Tycoon, which will premiere on July 28.

Are you guys interested in Like Father? Let us know in the comments or tweet us @ComingSoonnet.

The post Kristen Bell and Kelsey Grammer in Talks for Like Father at Netflix appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

Rachel Crow is in Talks for Bumblebee Transformers Movie

Deidra & Laney Rob a Train star Rachel Crow is in talks for Bumblebee

Deidra & Laney Rob a Train star Rachel Crow is in talks for Bumblebee

Deidra & Laney Rob a Train star Rachel Crow is in talks for a key role in the Transformers spinoff Bumblebee, according to Tracking Board. Jorge Lendeborg Jr. (Spider-Man: Homecoming, the upcoming Brigsby Bear) was recently cast opposite Hailee Steinfeld (True GritThe Edge of Seventeen) in the upcoming Paramount Pictures film.

Bumblebee has been a fan favorite since he was first introduced. He transforms from a Volkswagen Beetle in the earlier versions of the character. In the Transformers Cinematic Universe, he transforms into a Chevrolet Camaro. The character most recently appeared in Transformers: The Last Knight, starring Mark Wahlberg, Jerrod Carmichael, Isabela Moner, Josh Duhamel, Anthony Hopkins, Laura Haddock, Santiago Cabrera, Liam Garrigan and Stanley Tucci. The Bumblebee movie is reportedly a prequel to the Bay franchise, however, and will tell the story of the fan-favorite Autobot in the 1980s.

Christina Hodson, Brian Holdner, Stephen Davis, Lorezo Di Bonaventura, Michael Bay and Steven Spielberg are producing the Bumblebee film

Rachel Crow is known for her work in the film Deidra & Laney Rob a Train, which premiered at Sundance. She was recently cast in the upcoming untitled TV movie spinoff of the ABC series The Goldbergs. She was a finalist on season 1 of The X Factor and voiced Carla in Rio 2, as well as doing a song for the film’s soundtrack. Her voice was also heard in the Netflix series Home: Adventures with Tip & Oh, where she played Gratuity ‘Tip’ Tucci.

The Bumblebee film is set to hit theaters on June 8, 2018. What do you think of the casting of Rachel Crow in the Transformers spinoff? Are you excited for the film? We want to hear from you. Leave your thoughts in the comments below or tweet us @ComingSoonnet.

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)

The post Rachel Crow is in Talks for Bumblebee Transformers Movie appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

1 2 3 6