Superhero Bits: New Injustice 2 Trailer, Neil Gaiman’s Batman Story, Aquaman Crew & More

Injustice 2

Who is the costume designer for Aquaman? Which other Marvel heroes have been inhabited by The Phoenix? How power hungry is Superman in the new Injustice 2 trailer? Want to see a fanmade trailer for a Christopher Nolan directed Nightwing movie with Casey Affleck as The Riddler? What Batman story has Neil Gaiman been working on for nearly 30 years? All that and more in this edition of Superhero Bits.

Kevin Smith - Supergirl - Daxamite Throne Room

Kevin Smith revealed the Daxamite throne room from an upcoming episode of Supergirl he’s directing next.

Aquaman has supposedly hired The Matrix and Amazing Spider-Man costume designer Kym Barrett for production.

Spider-Man as Phoenix

Comic Book Resources runs down some of the other Marvel Comics heroes who have been taken over by The Phoenix.

This week’s Arrow hit a new milestone for the series, but it wasn’t a good one: it had the show’s lowest ratings ever.

A post shared by Movie News Now (@movienewsnow) on

Keep an eye out for this Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 standee to lounge around in at your local movie theater.

Dwayne Johnson dives further into why he refers to Black Adam as a hero, and it’s just a matter of interpretation.

Superman is still off his rocker in this new story trailer for the Injustice 2 video game coming later this year.

A new rumor says that Deadpool 2 is supposed to start production on May 1, but take that with a grain of salt.

Continue Reading Superhero Bits>>

Due to the amount of graphics and images included in Superhero Bits, we have to split this post over THREE pages. Click the link above to continue to the next page of Superhero Bits.

The post Superhero Bits: New Injustice 2 Trailer, Neil Gaiman’s Batman Story, Aquaman Crew & More appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Zero Draft Thirty: Story Prep — Script Diary

The last thing you should do before you type FADE IN…

Do you have a story you want to write? A feature length movie screenplay? An original TV pilot? A web series pilot? A novel? Short story? An epic length limerick?

The Zero Draft Thirty 2017 Spring Challenge is for you!

March 1: You type FADE IN / Once upon a time.

March 31: You type FADE OUT / And they all lived happily ever after.

Hold on. I’ve just heard from the proper authorities that our request for an additional day in March has been granted. So technically, you’ve got 31 days, but since we’ve already got all the invitations printed as Zero Draft Thirty, we’ll just keep it at that.

In any event, here is some background on exactly what the Zero Draft Thirty Challenge is. On October 15, 2015, I posted this, inviting people to join me in November as I pounded out a draft of a comedy script. Hundreds of people responded.

So I posted this a few days later. Hundreds more people enlisted in the cause. We even got a groovy visual to go along with the initiative:

Then every day for 30 days in November, I did a Zero Draft Thirty post with inspirational writing quotes, videos, and handed out a daily Trumbo Award to the person who was deemed worthy for their efforts in supporting our collective cause.

A Facebook group emerged from the process, now with over 600 members. The Challenge was written up in Indiewire. Translated into Spanish. Got its own hashtag on Twitter: #ZD30SCRIPT.

Eventually over 1000 writers joined up for the Challenge. Via Facebook, Twitter, or email, nearly 200 writers let me know they had finished their Zero Drafts.

In processing all of this and noting how I had long promoted the idea that we should aim to write two scripts per year, I thought why not do a spring ZD30 Challenge and a fall ZD30 Challenge.

Hence the Zero Draft Thirty 2017 Spring Challenge in March.

And you are cordially invited.

In the days leading up to ZD30, I figured we could spend some time talking about story prep as well as psychological prep for our collective writing effort.

Today let’s talk about one of the most valuable first draft resources I have discovered: Script Diary.

The last thing I do before I type FADE IN is create yet a Word file, which I call Script Diary.

I come to the diary to start every writing session. I visit it when I get stuck. I return to it when I hit on a story revelation. Day after day, I use my script diary to chronicle the writing of the story.

At the start of a writing session, I note the date and time in the script diary, then get my fingers and brain loosened up by typing up my thoughts about the scene I am about to tackle. I’ll remind myself what type of scene it is, which characters are participating in it, what each of their agendas is, who is playing what story function for that scene, how the scene relates to the overall plot, what the central point of the scene is, and so on. As I’m doing that, normally lines of dialogue pop to mind and I’ll put those down — so in essence I’m pre-drafting the scene, and can take that sketch to my script file and use it to write the actual scene.

I also use the script diary to track my emotional connection to the story. For instance, I may be worried about whether the scene I’m about to write will work or not. I may be concerned that one of the characters doesn’t feel quite right. If I’m stuck, I use the diary as a place to express my fears about the story; in fact, if I’m really stuck, I’ll ‘ask’ the characters, right there in my diary, to talk to me, show me what they want or need.

Now you may think I’m crazy — talking to my characters, asking them for help! But ever since I’ve started using a script diary, my experience of my story’s characters has become that much more… real, I suppose is the best way to describe it.

Whenever I am stuck, I start writing in my script diary, and invariably I become aware of my characters. Suddenly, one of them will turn and halfway glance at me or motion, and I’ll ‘follow’ them.

What I am saying is that my characters lead me deeper into my story. They show me the way. And the script diary is a crucial part of that experience because, I think, I am opening myself up to my characters, creating a ‘dialogue’ with them on those diary pages.

And there’s something else that’s very cool about a script diary: when you’re done with the project, you’ve got this journal of the entire writing process. You can go back to see and feel the actual moments where you found a breakthrough, where you busted through a story block, where your characters spoke to you.

Like everything else in this succession of posts, a script diary may not work for you. However, I encourage you to try it at least once. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

Back to the Zero Draft Thirty Challenge:

March 1: Type FADE IN.
March 31: Type FADE OUT.

One month. A first draft of an original screenplay. TV pilot. Or a rewrite of an existing script.

For background on the Zero Draft Thirty challenge, go here.

Don’t forget the Zero Draft Thirty Facebook group. A terrific collection of folks who post things every day, even when we’re not in a challenge.

So calling all Zeronauts, Outlaws, Scamperers, and Writing Warriors. Who’s up for pounding out a Zero Draft in September? LET’S DO THIS THING!

Hashtag: #ZD30SCRIPT.


Zero Draft Thirty: Story Prep — Script Diary was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

‘American Horror Story’ New Season To Be About Election. What Are Likely Filming Locations?

FX’s wildly popular anthology horror series American Horror Story has covered a wide range of concepts, from haunted houses, hotels, asylums and freak shows. Still, no one could have guessed what topic creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk would tackle for the series’ upcoming seventh season: the recent U.S. presidential election. The news, which was announced by Murphy on Bravo’s Watch What Happens Live is noteworthy for many reasons. None of the previous seasons have been so blatantly inspired by real-life events like this one. While the first season of American Crime Story tackled the O.J. Simpson murder trial to much critical acclaim, that was done over decades after the case. Here, Murphy and Falchuk are tackling a very contentious election when the dust has barely begun to settle. Second, the fact that this is part of the American Horror Story franchise adds further intrigue. The results of the 2016 election upset many, but to put in the context of a horror series is especially eye-opening. It isn’t clear what direction will be taken with this season. It’s likely that Murphy and Falchuk will take creative license on real life happenings to give them a shocking twist (or two) that..

The post ‘American Horror Story’ New Season To Be About Election. What Are Likely Filming Locations? appeared first on On Location Vacations.


On Location Vacations

Zero Draft Thirty: Story Prep Fun With Index Cards!

Writers continue to step up to the Zero Draft Thirty 2017 Spring Challenge: In March, write a draft of an original movie or TV script. Some are jumping in to rewrite a screenplay. Others to generate story ideas.

Whatever you choose to do, the point is to use the period of March 1-March 31 as a concentrated creative effort (a la NANOWRIMO).

In the days leading up to the ZD30 Challenge, I figured we could spend some time talking about story prep as well as psychological prep for our collective writing effort. I began that process in this post yesterday sharing some tips on how to break a story in prep. Today we get down to brass tacks ‘coz I’m talking… index cards.

This is an index card. In a digital world, it is a decidedly analog thing. But for most screenwriters and TV writers, it is one of the most indispensable tools of the trade.

See this?

This is what a wall in a TV writers room may look like at any given time, cluttered with index cards.

How can you use index cards?

* Brainstorm: Any time you have an idea for a scene, beat, character, line of dialogue, theme, whatever, you jot it down on an index card, and tack it up on your wall. That way you have it somewhere so you won’t forget the idea.

* Connections: More important, seeing all that story ‘stuff’ laid out in front of you can lead to interesting creative associations, kinda like what Carrie did in the TV series “Homeland”:

Saul looking at Carrie’s wall going all WFT?!?!

* Plotting: This is where index cards can be really handy. Let’s say you write down every beat and every scene you can think of, one for each index card. If you’re writing a movie script, divide the cards into four piles: Act 1, Act 2A, Act 2B, Act 3. Sort the cards into what pile you feel like they might go in. Then work through each pile, scene by scene, trying to construct a linear flow. Some scenes will feel out of place, so you move them to another pile. Some scenes will feel useless, so you set them aside. There will be gaps from this scene to that, so you simply pick up an index card and write on it, “Need a bridge scene here,” put it into its place, and move on, eventually brainstorming the requisite scene. Then you put all the four piles together into one stack. Now go through that stack over and over and over again, telling the story so it flows one scene to the next. Then tack your story up onto the wall like this:

Or on a table like this:

I interviewed Academy Award winning screenwriter Dustin Lance Black (Milk) and he said this:

Then what I do is find the scenes that speak to that, and I put them on note cards. I have this table in my kitchen that’s of a certain size that I think is about two hours. And I start laying out these note cards and if they start to spill over the table, I know I’ve got to cut stuff. I keep doing and doing and doing it, going through it and through it and through it, combining things, telescoping time, combining characters if I have to until these cards fit on this table, then I think, will this collection of cards communicate the reason for this film? And hopefully do so in a dramatic and entertaining way.

In the spirit of Show It, Don’t Say It, go to 1:40 of this interview clip with Lance and see what he’s talking about… including the table!

* Outline: Once you have your story sorted out, you can create an outline. Then you are ready to type FADE IN.

BTW you will notice many writers use different color cards. Typically that’s about tracking various subplots: White for the Plotline, blue for this subplot, yellow for that subplot, and so on. This is helpful because you can visually tell how you are cross-cutting between storylines which can help in terms of pace, transitions, etc.

I know some of you will chime in and suggest a variety of software programs that replicate index cards. And if that works for you, fine. But at the risk of sounding like an old farting Luddite, allow me to praise the simple 3×5 inch index card.

It is tactile.

You can feel it in your hands.

You can cram tons of information on each card — dialogue, scene description, theme, questions, reminders, all in ink, your words, another tactile experience. You know, actual writing.

When you have your stack of cards, holding it in your lap, there’s actual heft to it, substance.

This is your story… and these cards represent it actually having come into being.

Then when you lay it out on a table or tack it up on a wall, you can step back in actual physical space and stare at it, let your eyes roam back and forth.

It’s not squished onto 14" computer monitor, little electronic bits of data.

Hell, no. It takes up a whole goddammed wall of paper, ink and tacks!

Again a tactile experience: It’s a story and it’s real!

So here’s to the humble index card, pawns in our creative chess game. But if we keep working them and working them until the story emerges into life, we can crown those pawns and turn them into queens.

And our story will rise to glory.

[Cue heroic soundtrack, writer weeps, audience cheers… and black].

My embrace of the importance of story prep led me to create — to my knowledge — the first online workshop of its type — Prep: From Concept to Outline. That was seven years ago when I launched Screenwriting Master Class and it has proved to be one of the most popular courses I have ever offered. My next sessions begin June 5 and July 17.

Which brings us back to the Zero Draft Thirty 2017 Spring Challenge.

March 1: You type FADE IN / Once upon a time.

March 31: You type FADE OUT / And they all lived happily ever after.

One month. A draft of an original screenplay.

Who’s with me?

For background on the original Zero Draft Thirty challenge back in November 2015, go here.

It’s cool! It’s crazy! It’s free!

NOTE: For those of you using Twitter, use the hashtag #ZD30SCRIPT. And don’t forget to join the Zero Draft Thirty Facebook Group.

Tomorrow: More thoughts on prepping yourself for the ZD30 Challenge!


Zero Draft Thirty: Story Prep Fun With Index Cards! was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Zero Draft Thirty: Story Prep

Writers continue to step up to the Zero Draft Thirty 2017 Spring Challenge: In March, write a draft of an original movie or TV script. Some are jumping in to rewrite a screenplay. Others to generate story ideas.

Whatever you choose to do, the point is to use the period of March 1-March 31 as a concentrated creative effort (a la NANOWRIMO).

For those of you who are planning on writing a first draft of a script, let’s consider this: Story prep.

Longtime GITS readers know my thoughts on the value of breaking a story in prep:

  • You exponentially increase the odds you will actually get from FADE IN to FADE OUT.
  • You shorten the amount of time you have to spend page-writing.
  • By giving yourself the freedom to explore in prep, you discover tons about your story universe.
  • Knowing your story well enables you to enjoy the page-writing process more.

And there’s this: If you have any serious aspirations to become a professional Hollywood screenwriter or TV writer, you absolutely must have some sort of approach to story prep. Sure, if you only write on spec, maybe you can just type FADE IN and go off to find your story. Nothing wrong with that. However if you have a 10–12 week turnaround for a writing assignment, you need to use your time efficiently, and devoting at least a few of those weeks to breaking story does precisely that.

My embrace of the importance of story prep led me to create — to my knowledge — the first online workshop of its type — Prep: From Concept to Outline. That was seven years ago when I launched Screenwriting Master Class and it has proved to be one of the most popular courses I have ever offered. My next sessions begin June 5 and July 17.

If you are plunging headfirst into the Zero Draft Thirty challenge, my advice: Spend next week prepping your story. Here are come tips:

  • Character, Character, Character! Start with some basic questions: Who is my Protagonist? What do they want (Conscious Goal)? What do they need (Unconscious Goal)? Then go from there. Every character who emerges in your process, ask yourself: What do they have to do with the Protagonist’s journey? How do they impact the Protagonist’s psychological transformation? My mantra is this: Start with character. End with character. Find the story in between.
  • Brainstorm! This may be the single most important aspect to story prep: Giving free reign to your right-brain. It’s not only about free association, it’s also using direct engagement exercises with your characters, things like interviews, monologues, sit-downs. Create a Master Brainstorming List and put everything down. Don’t pre-judge anything. You never know when some moment, line of dialogue, theme, stray image can become important in your story-crafting process.
  • Plotting! What are the major plot points? Are there sets of scenes which tell a mini-story with their own Beginning, Middle, and End? If so, you can shape them into Sequences which you can connect one to the other to create a seamless narrative. Perhaps the most important plot point to know before typing FADE IN: What is the end of your story? And by that, I mean what I call the Final Struggle, the story’s Big Test which provides a resolution to the plot.
  • Metamorphosis! Joseph Campbell said the entire point of The Hero’s Journey is this: Transformation. So as you do story prep, be sure to dig deep into the Internal World, the psychological realm of your story universe. What is the Protagonist’s beginning Psyche State? What is the Protagonist’s ending Psych State? Those define the bookends of their metamorphosis. In a very real way, the plot services that journey. Focus on that arc and how the character changes.

This is precisely the type of content we get into in my Prep: From Concept to Outline workshop in a structured stage by stage process over a period of 6 weeks. But there’s no reason you can’t do some approximation of the same thing on your own. Use these several days on story prep to provide a strong foundation for your page-writing part of the process.

But again, the main thing: Engage your characters! It’s their story. No one knows it as well as they do. The more you spend time probing into each of their individual lives and backstories, thinking about their respective narrative functions — why each one is a participant in the story — the better off you will be as you pound out pages.

Which brings us back to the Zero Draft Thirty 2017 Spring Challenge.

March 1: You type FADE IN / Once upon a time.

March 31: You type FADE OUT / And they all lived happily ever after.

One month. A draft of an original screenplay.

Who’s with me?

For background on the original Zero Draft Thirty challenge back in November 2015, go here.

It’s cool! It’s crazy! It’s free!

NOTE: For those of you using Twitter, use the hashtag #ZD30SCRIPT. And don’t forget to join the Zero Draft Thirty Facebook Group.

Tomorrow: More thoughts on prepping yourself for the ZD30 Challenge!


Zero Draft Thirty: Story Prep was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Why ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’ Deserves the VFX Oscar

This breakdown of special effects used to create Jedha and Scarif proves that ILM should once again prevail at the Academy Awards.

Let’s be honest: there were more than a few moments in Rogue One where the use of CGI was more than evident. The decisions to bring Moff Tarkin back from the dead and reproduce a young Leia were divisive, to say the least, among Star Wars fans.

But for all the times you notice the VFX, the reel Industrial Light & Magic compiled below will show you just how many times you may have missed it.

It’s clear that there was only so much that Gareth Edwards could do with practical effects for his epic war story. That’s where ILM comes in. What’s most impressive about their work is not the massive explosions or stalking imperial marchers, but the subtle details they used to create the environments of the planets Jedha and Scarif.

Read More

No Film School

The next Go Into The Story Read and Analysis Script: “La La Land”

Read the script for the hit movie musical and analyze it next week.

In 2015, we launched several initiatives at Go Into The Story. One of the best: A script read and analysis series. As a result, there are 61 scripts GITS readers have analyzed. Moreover volunteers wrote up scene-by-scene breakdowns for each script, not only to serve as a foundation for our week-long discussion, but also to create an online resource for writers. To date, we have 45 scene-by-scene breakdowns.

Beginning tomorrow Monday, February 20, we will spend a week digging into and analyzing the movie script La La Land, written by Damien Chazelle.

To date, the movie has grossed $ 297M in worldwide box office revenues. With a production budget of a reported $ 30M and award season accolades still to come, it is an undeniable smash hit. Ironically no movie studio wanted to make this movie, yet it has resonated with audiences. Why? That will be a central question we’ll consider as we analyze the script.

Our daily schedule next week:

Monday: Scene-By-Scene Breakdown
Tuesday: Major Plot Points
Wednesday: Characters
Thursday: Themes
Friday: Dialogue
Saturday: Takeaways

You may download the script for La La Land here.

Join in the conversation and analysis starting tomorrow!


The next Go Into The Story Read and Analysis Script: “La La Land” was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

The next Go Into The Story Read and Analysis Script: “La La Land”

Read the script for the hit movie musical and analyze it next week.

In 2015, we launched several initiatives at Go Into The Story. One of the best: A script read and analysis series. As a result, there are 61 scripts GITS readers have analyzed. Moreover volunteers wrote up scene-by-scene breakdowns for each script, not only to serve as a foundation for our week-long discussion, but also to create an online resource for writers. To date, we have 45 scene-by-scene breakdowns.

Beginning tomorrow Monday, February 20, we will spend a week digging into and analyzing the movie script La La Land, written by Damien Chazelle.

To date, the movie has grossed $ 297M in worldwide box office revenues. With a production budget of a reported $ 30M and award season accolades still to come, it is an undeniable smash hit. Ironically no movie studio wanted to make this movie, yet it has resonated with audiences. Why? That will be a central question we’ll consider as we analyze the script.

Our daily schedule next week:

Monday: Scene-By-Scene Breakdown
Tuesday: Major Plot Points
Wednesday: Characters
Thursday: Themes
Friday: Dialogue
Saturday: Takeaways

You may download the script for La La Land here.

With the influx of 47 movie scripts from 2016 made available to the public during the current For Your Consideration season, I am soliciting volunteers to read one of these scripts and do a scene-by-scene breakdown to be used as the foundation of our ongoing script read and analysis series.

As proof of the importance of reading scripts / watching movies and burrowing into their underlying structure, check out this video clip with screenwriter Kristen ‘Kiwi’ Smith who co-wrote such hits as 10 Things I Hate About You and Legally Blonde.

For those folks who volunteer to write a scene-by-scene breakdown, beyond your name being noted here, my thanks, and your own personal dose of creative juju, you will learn something about story structure and further develop this important skill set.

To download PDFs of the scene-by-scene breakdowns we have aggregated to date, go here.

Here is our current list of literary heroes and heroines!

A Monster Calls / Andrew Turner

Anthropoid / Marija Nielsen

Arrival / Ashish Chand

Captain Fantastic / Despina Karintis

Denial / Gina Gomez

Eye in the Skye / Abhinav Tiwari and Bruce Gordon

Fences / Matt Cowley

The Founder / Eric Rodriguez

Hail, Caesar! / Brianne VanTuyle

Hell or High Water / Andrew Lightfoot

The Invitation / Joni Trumpold Brainerd

Jackie / Karen Dantas

Kubo and the Two Strings / Nikki Syreeta

La La Land / Priya Gopal

Loving / Liz Correal

Maggie’s Plan / Monique Mata

Manchester by the Sea / Ashley Lara

Miles Ahead / Alecia Hodges

Moonlight / Ryan Canty

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 / Nikki Leydecker

The Secret Life of Pets / Paul Huffman

Victor Frankenstein / Lisa Gomez

Zootopia / Will King

Italics = Turned in scene-by-scene breakdown

Bold = Have used scene-by-scene breakdown in week-long analysis

Now is YOUR chance to contribute to this most worthy cause and provide an additional resource for the online screenwriting community.

Let’s not forget about what YOU can learn in the process. When Nikki Leydecker emailed me her scene-by-scene breakdown for My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2, she wrote this:

I have done breakdown’s before, but by beats via the Save The Cat method. That method and this method are great for learning story structure. However I found that this version of a script breakdown gave me more insight into the story. I was able to find the storylines easily and the central theme of the script. Breaking down all the scenes provided a clear indicator of what worked and what didn’t. I would find set ups and payoffs, and some set ups that didn’t pay off to anything at all. Another benefit I found was that it was great warm up exercise for my own writing. Instead of a writing prompt, reading a script and writing a few scenes out quickly moved my brain in writing mode. It was a lengthy process, but an enjoyable one. I am going to take this experience and use it again for my own work. It will help tremendously with the rewrite process because I will be able to spot the strengths and weaknesses in the story.

It’s a win-win. Plus you get public accolades from me and a hearty dose of creative juju. Go here to see the entire roster of 2016 movie scripts now available for download. Cross reference the list with those above already with volunteers, determine which ones are still available, then write a RESPONSE to this post and claim your script to read and break down.

To see examples of scene-by-scene breakdowns, go here.

IF YOU HAVE VOLUNTEERED, PLEASE SEND ME YOUR SCENE-BY-SCENE BREAKDOWN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE!!!

Don’t let your fingers linger, folks. Send me your scene-by-scene breakdowns!

Finally allow me to use the words of one of Hollywood’s hottest screenwriters to bludgeon you over the head with the value of reading scripts. From one of my most recent interview, Jon Spaihts responds to my final question, What advice would you offer to aspiring screenwriters about learning the craft and breaking into Hollywood? Here’s his answer:

Read the script and then watch the movie. Watch the movie and then read the script. Watch the movie with the script in your lap. Study the parts. You have to see through the surfaces. Being a fan is insufficient. Break it down. That means slowing it down and looking at it through a series of different lenses.

Once you’ve begun to do that, you can see what the parts of a screenplay and the parts of a movie do.

First thing Jon said: Read scripts.

We’re going to do that every other week in 2017 combined with a week-long analysis of each script. People who volunteer to do a scene-by-scene breakdown provide an important aspect of that process.

See you Monday as we continue our 2017 script reading series with our week-long analysis of La La Land.


The next Go Into The Story Read and Analysis Script: “La La Land” was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

‘Song to Song’ Trailer: Terrence Malick’s New Love Story

Song to Song trailer

Over three years ago, Val Kilmer pulled out a chainsaw at Austin’s Fun Fun Fun Music Festival when he was performing on stage with The Black Lips. Kilmer wasn’t a new addition to the band gone mad or anything; he was shooting a scene for Terrence Malick‘s long-awaited upcoming film, Song to Song, previously titled Weightless. While Malick often cuts great actors out of his films, thankfully Kilmer and his chainsaw made the final cut of Malick’s new love story, which stars Ryan GoslingRooney MaraMichael Fassbender, and Natalie Portman.

Below, watch the Song to Song trailer.

Set in the Austin music scene, this story of “seduction and betrayal” follows two songwriters, Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Gosling), in love. Their world gets shaken up when Cook (Fassbender), a serious figure in the music industry, enters the picture. He looks to play a dangerous and seductive role in Faye and BV’s lives, as does Portman’s character.

Here’s the trailer for South by Southwest’s opening night film:

Song to Song looks like it’d make for a good double feature with Malick’s Knight of Cups, which followed a lost artist wandering the visually wondrous, sometimes nightmarish landscapes of Los Angeles. After seeing how Malick captured the sprawling nature of L.A., it’ll be exciting to see what he does with Austin. It’s a beautiful city Malick and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki (The Revenant) could work wonders with.

The filmmaker continues to make more and more movies, thank heavens. We might even see another film from him this year, a drama set during World War II, but let’s not hold our breaths for that one and instead continue to look forward to Song to Song, which comes out one month from today.

Benicio del Toro, Haley BennettClifton Collins Jr.Holly Hunter, and Angela Bettis appear in the film, but for how long, we’ll see. Christian BaleCate BlanchettTrevante RhodesBoyd Holdbrook, and other notable actors shot for a few days as well. Bale and Blanchett are confirmed to have made the final cut; we’ll see about Rhodes, Holbrook, and others. Expect appearances from Iggy Pop, Patti Smith, Florence and the Machine, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and Lykke Li.

Here’s the official synopsis:

In this modern love story set against the Austin, Texas music scene, two entangled couples — struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling), and music mogul Cook (Michael Fassbender) and the waitress whom he ensnares (Natalie Portman) — chase success through a rock ‘n’ roll landscape of seduction and betrayal.

Song to Song opens in theaters March 17th.

The post ‘Song to Song’ Trailer: Terrence Malick’s New Love Story appeared first on /Film.


/Film

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