A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 26

This is the eighth year in a row I’ve run this series in April.

Today’s story: The Most Expensive Record Never Sold: Discogs, Billy Yeager And The $ 18,000 Hoax That Almost Was.

This is the story of a hoax that almost was. Its motivating force was a hunger for fame, or infamy, or whispered legend in a particularly American sort of way. It begins on a beach somewhere in south Florida.

Earlier this year, a test pressing (literally a test, for labels and artists to hear before ordering a full run of new record) of an unknown musician’s record was put up for sale on Discogs, a resale website popular with collectors. Two days later that test pressing almost became, at a price tag of $ 18,000, the most expensive album ever sold on the site, besting a record set last year for a sublimely rare Prince piece which sold for $ 15,000.

The lightning-fast turnaround on this record-breaking sale, however, seems to have been a fiction woven by the record’s creator. This morning, Discogs canceled the transaction.

Cover art for 301 Jackson St.

The album, called 301 Jackson St., was recorded by Billy Yeager, a Florida man who has pursued musical fame (or at least notoriety) for 37 years, by his own account. Despite a clear talent for guitar and a cosmically eccentric and dubiously effective knack for self-promotion, Yeager has been stymied repeatedly. The most eccentric — and ill-conceived — example of his promotional facility, bar none, came when Yeager spent two years planning and executing a hoax that would eventually convince a television station and a weekly paper to believe that he was Jimmy Story, the son of Jimi Hendrix, who was in possession of lost recordings from the psychedelic legend. To pull off the scam, Yeager dyed his skin brown. As The Miami Herald wrote in 1996:

The recently proclaimed, mumbling, mentally defective, cordovan-hued, long-lost love child of Jimi Hendrix is really a Swedish-blond, singing surfer guy from Hollywood beach.

Both the TV station and the newspaper were victims of an incredibly detailed hoax — including forged photos, signatures and birth certificate — that was two years in the making by itinerant surfer/musician Billy Yeager. He then called The Herald to claim, er, credit for the hoax, executed for attention.

Now, it seems clear that Yeager has attempted to perpetrate another hoax: He is, it seems, the seller who posted 301 Jackson St. on Discogs. He’s also likely the buyer. Which means that $ 18,000 never changed hands and also raises the possibility that the test pressing of 301 Jackson St. does not exist at all.

And, of course, the story takes place in Florida. Where else could it be? So what if a musician tried to pawn himself off as a descendant of Jimi Hendrix? What if he claimed to an unreleased LP of Hendrix recordings? He’s just a scammer trying to cash in to the tune of a few thousands dollars.

What if the shit hits the fan? Perhaps an obsessive, deranged Hendrix fan takes our boy (Chuck) hostage. Maybe a criminal outfit figure they can score big with a Hendrix LP, so they go after Chuck. Let’s toss in local police. The FBI. A private eye hired by the Hendrix family.

At some point and feeling the pressure, Chuck confesses the truth. But here’s the thing: All of the groups and people pursuing him don’t buy it. They figure Chuck is lying to get people off his ass. In fact, his denials may increase the pursuers’ belief that the LP is the real deal.

Put Chuck on the run. Chased by a half-dozen outfits. Throw several of Florida’s finest weirdos with whom Chuck intersects… voila! A comic tour du force!

There you go: My twenty sixth story idea for the month. And it’s yours. Free!

Each day this month, I invite you to click on RESPONSES and join me to do some further brainstorming. Take each day’s story idea and see what it can become when you play around with it. These are all valuable skills for a writer to develop.

See you in comments. And come back tomorrow for another Story Idea Each Day For A Month.

For other posts in my A Story Idea Each Day for a Month (2017) series, go here.


A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 26 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 25

This is the eighth year in a row I’ve run this series in April.

Today’s story: Driver of stolen big rig carrying hazardous material surrenders after three-hour pursuit.

A man suspected of stealing a big rig filled with low-grade hazardous material led authorities on a three-hour pursuit before ultimately surrendering at a truck stop in Whitewater on Tuesday afternoon.

The pursuit had began at about 10:30 a.m. between Barstow and Victorville, according to the California Highway Patrol. It ended in Whitewater at about 1:30 p.m.

The renegade trucker kept television news viewers riveted to the screen for hours as he refused to pull over for the CHP and sped south on the 15 Freeway to the 60 Freeway. As police and news aircraft hovered overhead, the big rig traveled east through the Badlands and onto the 10 Freeway in Beaumont and then north on Highway 62, toward Joshua Tree National Park, before making a U-turn.

The driver spoke with CHP officials on the phone and said he “didn’t want to go back to jail,” authorities said.

This takes me back to one of the earliest pitches I made in Hollywood: A down on his luck truck driver lands a gig only to discover the load he’s carrying is explosive and the object of pursuit for a variety of interested parties, both legal and illegal.

Riffing off the real life story, it’s a huge coincidence for a guy to steal a truck only to discover the payload is illegal / dangerous. So is there a way to ‘steer’ this character so that the theft turns out to be a case of the Bad Guys manipulating the driver — who is in desperate economic straits (perhaps brought on by the Nemesis?) — and once he’s driving, he’s screwed.

Straight-ahead action movie with some surprising revelations as to who did what and why. Also what exactly is in the truck?

It’s Duel meets Speed.

There you go: My twenty fifth story idea for the month. And it’s yours. Free!

Each day this month, I invite you to click on RESPONSES and join me to do some further brainstorming. Take each day’s story idea and see what it can become when you play around with it. These are all valuable skills for a writer to develop.

See you in comments. And come back tomorrow for another Story Idea Each Day For A Month.

For other posts in my A Story Idea Each Day for a Month (2017) series, go here.


A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 25 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 24

This is the eighth year in a row I’ve run this series in April.

Today’s story: Katie Rose on Top of the World.

Twenty years after her father, Seattle climbing legend Scott Fischer, died on Everest, Katie Rose Fischer-Price traveled back to the land that claimed him — and found herself in the midst of an even greater catastrophe.

If you know the name Scott Fischer — and you’re not a climber yourself — it’s likely thanks to the unprecedented media attention of (and the public’s ongoing fascination with) the 1996 Everest disaster. Even before tragedy struck, ’96 was set to be one of the most documented climbing seasons ever on the mountain. An IMAX film crew, following another Seattle climbing legend, Ed Viesturs, was on location. So was then Seattle-based author Jon Krakauer, on assignment for Outside magazine. (Krakauer would turn the resulting article into the best-selling book Into Thin Air.)

Some 50 climbers were on Everest on May 10, 1996. (Yet another Seattleite, postal worker Doug Hansen, was on his second summit attempt.) Fischer was there with Mountain Madness, his West Seattle–based mountaineering company, to lead eight clients to the top, including accomplished mountaineer and Manhattan socialite Sandy Hill (then Sandy Hill Pittman).

Fischer had summited Everest in 1994 without supplemental oxygen — an incredibly challenging and potentially deadly prospect at altitudes higher than 26,000 feet — as part of the first-ever Everest cleanup crew (a crew responsible for the removal of 5,000 pounds of climber trash). In the decades before, he tagged the Matterhorn, Aconcagua, and a host of impressive mountains throughout the Himalayas, including K2 and the first-ever successful American ascent of Lhotse, the world’s fourth-highest peak. Before the age of 40, he had stood atop the tallest peaks on six of seven continents (only Antarctica’s Vinson Massif eluded him).

During that time he turned his passion for climbing into a livelihood with Mountain Madness, guiding people to the highest points on earth. But it wasn’t what Fischer climbed that earned him acclaim in the mountaineering world, it was how he climbed. “There is no one that was more fun to be with in the mountains than Scott,” says Brent Bishop, a Seattle climber and part of Fischer’s team on his successful ’94 Everest bid. Fischer assailed mountains, as Bishop notes, “in good style,” finding joy in the delicate high-altitude dance and performing each of his personal expeditions without oxygen as a way to fully embrace the challenge.

Mountaineering was a chance to test the human body and mind for the introspective yet quick-smiling blond, but also an excuse to meet new people and see new places. Much of his legacy, in fact, was built on the lasting relationships with the cultures that thrived in the high alpine.

He married Jeannie Price, a soon-to-be Alaska Airlines pilot and his former National Outdoor Leadership School student, on Valentine’s Day, 1981. After settling in Seattle, the couple had two children, Andy and, four years later, Katie Rose. Scott had summited some of the gnarliest peaks in the world, but quickly found one of his biggest challenges under his own West Seattle roof. Katie developed an obstinate streak in her early years, much to the bemusement of Scott and the rest of the Fischer clan. “He began to call her K2,” remembers Jeannie. “The most formidable climb he ever did, and the most intransigent child he could imagine.”

Fischer and his guides, Neal Beidleman and Anatoli Boukreev, successfully brought six of their eight clients to the summit on May 10, 1996, but during the descent they were caught high in the Death Zone (the terrain above 26,000 feet) by a massive blizzard. While his guides and clients eventually descended safely, Fischer, who had become increasingly ill while shuttling climbers to and from camp, was unable to make it below the Balcony at 27,395 feet, eventually succumbing to hypothermia and becoming one of eight to perish in the deadliest 24 hours on Everest up to that point. Fischer’s good friend and business rival, New Zealand team leader Rob Hall, also died in the storm, marking the first time that two party leaders died in a single event on Everest. Both men’s bodies remain on the mountain to this day.

The death of a loved one is always a challenge for those left behind. But what if the person who died did so pursuing something bigger and more meaningful — to them — than their family members?

If your father died mountaineering knowing he could very well leave behind a wife and young child… how would that impact the child as she grew up? What message would she take from her father’s choice?

Thus a trek to a remote part of the world, a quixotic journey seeking closure.

Then a twist: A massive earthquake. Now it’s the daughter’s turn to survive. And perhaps in that experience, she comes to understand something of her father’s mindset, allowing her to accept him for who he was.

There you go: My twenty fourth story idea for the month. And it’s yours. Free!

Each day this month, I invite you to click on RESPONSES and join me to do some further brainstorming. Take each day’s story idea and see what it can become when you play around with it. These are all valuable skills for a writer to develop.

See you in comments. And come back tomorrow for another Story Idea Each Day For A Month.

For other posts in my A Story Idea Each Day for a Month (2017) series, go here.


A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 24 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 23

This is the eighth year in a row I’ve run this series in April.

Today’s story: Stunning 700-year-old giant cave used by Knights Templar found behind a rabbit hole in the British countryside.

The cave, beneath a farmer’s field in Shropshire, was used by the medieval religious order that fought in the Crusades.

It is thought the cave was built as a place to worship.

It contains a network of walkways that are “completely untouched”.

The hole leading into the cave looks just like a rabbit’s hole.

It was reportedly also once used by followers of a black magic cult.

There are many inscriptions on the cave walls.

Images by photographer Michael Scott

Countryside. Rabbit hole. Cave. Labyrinth. Inscriptions. Knights Templar. Black magic cult.

Insert a group of young boys and girls, and you’ve got another Goonies on your hand, especially if some 700 year-old knights magically come to life.

There you go: My twenty third story idea for the month. And it’s yours. Free!

Each day this month, I invite you to click on RESPONSES and join me to do some further brainstorming. Take each day’s story idea and see what it can become when you play around with it. These are all valuable skills for a writer to develop.

See you in comments. And come back tomorrow for another Story Idea Each Day For A Month.

For other posts in my A Story Idea Each Day for a Month (2017) series, go here.


A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 23 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

The next Go Into The Story Read and Analysis Script: “Kubo and the Two Strings”

Read the script for the acclaimed animated action adventure movie.

In 2015, we launched several initiatives at Go Into The Story. One of the best: A script read and analysis series. As a result, there are now 65 scripts GITS readers have analyzed. Moreover volunteers have written up scene-by-scene breakdowns, not only to serve as a foundation for our week-long discussions, but also to create an online resource for writers. To date, we have 55 scene-by-scene breakdowns. Thanks to Nikki Syreeta, we’ll be adding a new one next week.

Beginning Monday, April 24, we will spend a week digging into and analyzing the movie script Kubo and the Two Strings, screenplay by Marc Haimes and Chris Butler, story by Shannon Tindle and Marc Haimes.

For those who may have missed this wonderful animated movie (current IMDb rating: 7.9), here is a great chance to check it out. You may download a copy of the script here. You may also watch the movie on Netflix.

Our daily schedule next week:

Monday: Scene-By-Scene Breakdown
Tuesday: Major Plot Points
Wednesday: Characters
Thursday: Themes
Friday: Dialogue
Saturday: Takeaways

Finally allow me to use the words of one of Hollywood’s hottest screenwriters to bludgeon you over the head with the value of reading scripts. From one of my most recent interviews, Jon Spaihts responds to my final question, What advice would you offer to aspiring screenwriters about learning the craft and breaking into Hollywood? Here’s his answer:

Read the script and then watch the movie. Watch the movie and then read the script. Watch the movie with the script in your lap. Study the parts. You have to see through the surfaces. Being a fan is insufficient. Break it down. That means slowing it down and looking at it through a series of different lenses.

Once you’ve begun to do that, you can see what the parts of a screenplay and the parts of a movie do.

First thing Jon said: Read scripts.

Here’s your chance to do just that by digging into Kubo and the Two Strings and analyzing the story all next week.

See you tomorrow!


The next Go Into The Story Read and Analysis Script: “Kubo and the Two Strings” was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Reader Question: Are there specific ways to simplify and focus a story?

A question from Zach:

Anyone know of any specific ways to simplify a story? I feel like I lose touch with my main idea pretty quickly.

There must be some comparable aspects between essays and screenwriting…

Short of knowing the specifics of your situation, here are a few general thoughts.

1. I think your instinct is correct about there being something “comparable” between essays and screenwriting. In an essay, you typically have a central theme upon and around which you craft your ‘story.’ Likewise a good screenplay will almost always have a central theme. For example, the movie Tootsie has a theme that Michael (Dustin Hoffman) states point blank: “I was a better man as a woman than I was as a man.” You can go through virtually every scene in the movie that involves Michael / Dorothy and see that theme at work. Likewise in the movie K-9, I knew from day 1 the central theme of that story: The dog humanizes the human. Again you can see that at work in every scene of the movie.

So ask yourself a question: What is the central theme of my movie? If you can’t answer that question, then that’s probably an area where you would benefit spending some time brainstorming.

2. While the theme is basically an expression of a movie’s central ‘wisdom,’ don’t forget how important your story’s underlying concept is. For example, take the movie District 9 where the central story concept is — set against a backdrop of aliens having landed on Earth, stuck here, and living in apartheid type camps — about a Protagonist (Wikus) who becomes ‘infected’ by alien fluid and begins to transform into a ‘Prawn.’ That central concept not only informs the events of the plot, it also provides the backbone of the Themeline where Wikus moves from a rather racist attitude toward the aliens into sympathy and understanding of them.

So ask yourself a question: What is my story concept? You should be able to articulate that in a few lines, quickly and cleanly. If you can’t, then again, probably an area where you can spend more time digging into your story.

3. In my view, most stories lose their focus in Act Two or even Act Three because the writer has failed to answer some basic questions at the very beginning of the story. So here are some fundamental questions you should be able to answer about your story before you type FADE IN:

Who is the Protagonist?
The central and most important character in most stories.

What do they want?
P is typically conscious of this External World goal.

What do they need?
P is typically unconscious of or repressing their Internal World goal.

Who is keeping the P from their goal?
This is most likely your Nemesis.

Understanding who your Protagonist and Nemesis characters are, and what is at the core of their central conflict, is critical in shaping the spine of your plot, and also in how P’s needs emerge into the daylight and reshape who they are and how they see their ultimate goal.

There are other character questions you can ask, but for starters, there are the most critical. Now some plot questions:

What happens at the beginning of Act One?
How does your P begin the story?

What happens at the end of Act One?
What event thrusts the P out of their ordinary world and into the new world / world of adventure (per J. Campbell)?

What happens at the end of Act Two?
What plot point is a major blow to the P per their goal, an All Is Lost moment?

What happens at the end of Act Three?
How does your P end the story / what transpires in the Final Struggle?

Once again, if you can’t answer all those questions with a good deal of clarity, then you would do well to go into your story even deeper than you have.

A final piece of advice: Watch movies and read scripts. As you do that, pay close attention to how they keep their stories on track. In fact, you might benefit from doing a scene-by-scene breakdown as I did here for Shakespeare in Love. It’s a great way to visualize the ‘spine’ of a story and to see how in a well-crafted script, every scene is tied to and advances both the Plotline and the Themeline.

How about other GITS readers? What advice might you have for Zach simplify and focus a story?

Comment Archive

[Originally published February 18, 2010]


Reader Question: Are there specific ways to simplify and focus a story? was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 21

This is the eighth year in a row I’ve run this series in April.

Today’s story: #Vanlife, the Bohemian Social-Media Movement.

Emily King and Corey Smith had been dating for five months when they took a trip to Central America, in February, 2012. At a surf resort in Nicaragua, Smith helped a lanky American named Foster Huntington repair the dings in his board. When the waves were choppy, the three congregated in the resort’s hammock zone, where the Wi-Fi signal was strongest. One afternoon, Huntington listened to the couple have a small argument. Something about their fond irritation made him think that they’d be suited to spending long periods of time together in a confined space. “You guys would be great in a van,” he told them.

The year before, Huntington had given up his apartment in New York and his job as a designer at Ralph Lauren, and moved into a 1987 Volkswagen Syncro. He spent his days surfing, exploring, and taking pictures of his van parked in picturesque locations along the California coast. It was the early days of Instagram, and, over time, Huntington accumulated more than a million followers. He represented a new kind of social-media celebrity, someone famous not for starring in movies or recording hit songs but for documenting an enviable life. “My inspiration,” went a typical comment on one of his posts. “God I wish my life was that free and easy and amazing.” Huntington tagged his posts with phrases like #homeiswhereyouparkit and #livesimply, but the tag he used most often was #vanlife.

King and Smith left Nicaragua for Costa Rica, but the idea of the van stuck with them. King, a telegenic former business student, had quit her job at a Sotheby’s branch when she realized that she was unhappy. Smith, a competitive mountain biker and the manager of a kayak store, had never had a traditional office job. They figured they could live cheaply in a van while placing what they loved — travelling, surfing, mountain biking — at the center of their lives. When King found out that she’d been hired for a Web-development job that didn’t require her presence in an office, it suddenly seemed feasible.

King and Smith, who are thirty-two and thirty-one, respectively, had grown up watching “Saturday Night Live” sketches in which a sweaty, frantic Chris Farley character ranted, “I am thirty-five years old, I am divorced, and I live in a van down by the river!” But, the way Huntington described it, living in a vehicle sounded not pathetic but romantic. “I remember coming home and telling my mom, ‘I have something to tell you,’ ” King said. “She thought I was going to say we were getting married or having a baby. But I said, ‘We’re going to live in a van.’ ”

Emily King, Corey Smith on the road

Such an uplifting story! Young couple, burned out by work and modern life, hits the road and finds happiness. Just lovely. Except…

When one night they get lost. Narrow back roads. End up parked in a desolate off-road location. No worries. They hunker down to bed. Start to make love. Getting into it…

That’s when the scratching on the roof begins.

Yes, we are in horror territory. Harried couple vs. psychotic supernatural being. Fortunately the couple has learned to make do with whatever resources they have to cope with van life, so they are able to mount some clever defenses.

But still, it’s scary as shit!

There you go: My twenty first story idea for the month. And it’s yours. Free!

Each day this month, I invite you to click on RESPONSES and join me to do some further brainstorming. Take each day’s story idea and see what it can become when you play around with it. These are all valuable skills for a writer to develop.

See you in comments. And come back tomorrow for another Story Idea Each Day For A Month.

For other posts in my A Story Idea Each Day for a Month (2017) series, go here.


A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 21 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Full ‘Star Wars Battlefront II’ Trailer Introduces a New Canon Story, Improved Gameplay

Star Wars Battlefront 2 Trailer

When Star Wars: The Force Awakens brought the sci-fi saga back in a big way, Star Wars invaded every type of media you could think of, from comics to TV shows to video games. The latter resulted in the revival of one of the most popular video game franchises to take place in a galaxy far, far away: Star Wars Battlefront.

Though Star Wars Battlefront was a big bestseller before The Force Awakens hit theaters, the game ended up disappointing even some hardcore Star Wars fans by not having a campaign mode (creating fast boredom) and having some clunky gameplay, both as a soldier on the ground and as a pilot in space. Thankfully, it sounds like all those problems will be resolved when Star Wars Battlefront II arrives later this year.

Watch the full Star Wars Battlefront 2 trailer and get details on the video game sequel below.

A teaser trailer for Star Wars Battlefront II leaked a few days before it was meant to debut at Star Wars Celebration, where a much longer, more revealing trailer (watch above) revealed plenty of new details on the game. The panel from the convention also provided us with even more information, especially on the anticipated single player campaign mode. So let’s start with that part of the game.

starwarsbattlefront2-idenversio-helmetoff

Star Wars Battlefront II Campaign Mode

Easily the most exciting aspect of Star Wars Battlefront II is the new single player campaign. Rather than having a story that follows someone on the Rebel Alliance, as many Star Wars video games have done before, we’ll be following a female special forces Imperial soldier named Iden Versio (played by Janina Gavankar), the leader of an elite group known as Inferno Squad. If that sounds familiar, it’s because they’re also getting their own Star Wars book this summer.

Iden Versio has been raised on Imperial beliefs and propaganda for her entire life, growing up on a new planet created specifically for the game called Vardos. It’s an Imperial haven that is the perfect breeding ground to brainwash new recruits into joining the Empire and fighting for the cause. The Inferno Squad can do anything and everything, but they find themselves at a loss when the second Death Star is destroyed as seen in Return of the Jedi.

The campaign will follow Iden (who has a flying droid sidekick) and her squad as they try to avenge the Emperor and maintain control of the galaxy during the 30 year period that exists between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens. Here’s how the campaign is officially described on the Star Wars Battlefront II website:

Forge a new path as Iden Versio, commander of Inferno Squad—an Imperial special forces unit equally lethal on the ground and in space. Encounter many of Star Wars ‘ greatest characters in a story of revenge, betrayal, and redemption that spans 30 years.

Though Iden Versio will be the main character of the campaign, you’ll still get a chance to play as Star Wars icons like Luke Skywalker, as well as one of the awesome new additions to the game, Kylo Ren.

starwarsbattlefront2-stormtroopers

New and Improved Multiplayer Battles

Along with the new campaign mode, the coolest thing about Star Wars Battlefront II is that it spans all eras of Star Wars. Players will be able to take part in massive 40-player fights in locations all across the Star Wars galaxy. That means there will be characters, vehicles and locations from the prequels, the original trilogy and the ongoing sequel trilogy. Though there will be some pieces of the Clone Wars included, there was no word on whether any characters or vehicles from Star Wars Rebels would make it into Star Wars Battlefront II, at least not yet.

There will be new vehicles in space and on land (for example, you’ll get to ride a tauntaun this time), though you’ll have to unlock them for use by achieving various gameplay goals in a given round as opposed to just stumbling upon a power up in the level like the current game. DICE enlisted the developer Criterion, who worked on the Star Wars Battlefront Rogue One: X-Wing VR Mission to help create ships and vehicles that control well in combat, something that was a little difficult to master in the first Star Wars Battlefront.

As for the soldiers themselves, players will be able to upgrade and customize their troopers with new weapons, abilities and other customized details. There will also be classes introduced to the multiplayer mode this time, likely unlocking more weapons and abilities as you continue to play.

Furthermore, the major Star Wars heroes and villains who will be playable (and not just used a power-ups during battle anymore) can also be customized and upgraded. Luke Skywalker, Kylo Ren, Rey, Yoda and Darth Maul are just some of the Star Wars icons confirmed to be included in the game, and you’ll be able to give them distinct abilities to make them even more powerful. And don’t worry, because soldiers will have their own upgrades available that allow them to stand a chance facing the heroes, unlike the first game where they were extremely difficult to kill.

***

All of these details regarding Star Wars Battlefront II have the makings of a sequel that improves upon all of the shortcomings of the original game. It would appear that EA listened to everything fans said they wanted from a new Star Wars Battlefront game and added them to Battlefront II. We’ll find out when the game hits PlayStation 4, Windows PC and Xbox One on November 17.

Thanks to io9 and Polygon for providing us with specifics on the game from the Star Wars Celebration panel that took place this past weekend.

The post Full ‘Star Wars Battlefront II’ Trailer Introduces a New Canon Story, Improved Gameplay appeared first on /Film.


/Film

There’s another United horror story, and it will break your heart

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The United horror stories keep coming out of the woodwork. After the internet exploded over a viral video showing a man being forcibly dragged from his seat on a United flight last weekend, another passenger has taken to Medium to share his horrible experience with the airline.

Trey Harris’ tale of inhumane customer service and unreasonable responses left him frustrated and upset — enough so he wrote a lengthy post Thursday about the incident, which happened at the beginning of last month. 

Harris’ honeymoon was nearly ruined when United barred him from bringing his «previously-approved, DOT & TSA-allowed mobility device,» a Segway miniPro, on board his flight from Newark to San Diego, where the couple had planned to board a cruise. Harris says in the post he has spondylitis, a type of autoimmune spinal arthritis, which can make walking difficult. Read more…

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