Friday, June 23 Filming Locations for Jessica Jones, American Horror Story, Good Behavior, The Sinner, & more!

Here’s a look at various filming locations for Friday, June 23: Filming in California TV Series: Heathers Stars: Shannen Doherty Location: Studio on  Nordhoff St., Chatsworth TV Series: American Horror Story Stars: Billie Lourd Location: RSI Locations in Pomona TV Series: Ray Donovan Stars: Liev Schreiber Location: SONY Studio, Los Angeles Filming in Florida Movie: Killroy Was Here Director: Kevin Smith Location: Ringling College of Art and Design Filming in Illinois Movies: Widows Stars: Liam Neeson Location: 4700 W Lake St, Chicago  Filming in New York‏ TV Series: Red Oaks Stars: Craig Roberts Location:Walker St and Centre St, NYC Project: Unknown  Location:  Seminary Ave, Yonkers  TV Series: Shades of Blue Stars: Jennifer Lopez Location: Kaufman Astoria Studios, Astoria TV Series: The Tick Stars: Peter Serafinowicz Location: Queens College Movie: Untitled Steven Spielberg Project Stars: Tom Hanks Location: N Broadway and Hamilton Ave White Plains TV Series: The Sinner Stars: Jessica Biel Location: Brewster Ave, Yonkers Movie: Summertime Directed By: Ed Burns Location: Beach Channel and Beach 99 St, Queens TV Series: Mozart in the Jungle Stars: Gael García Bernal Location: 30th Rd and 21st St, Long Island City TV Series: Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Stars: Rachel Brosnahan Location: Broadway and W 83rd St, NYC TV Series: Jessica..

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In Praise of David Lynch’s The Straight Story

The Straight Story

The Straight Story: David Lynch’s sweetest movie is also one of his most challenging

David Lynch‘s The Straight Story opens with a view of a starry night sky. As we gaze at (into? through? beyond?) these stars we become aware of quiet, ethereal music, floating in our subconscious like something recalled rather than heard. There’s a faint echo of Laura Palmer‘s theme. Of course there is. Laura’s out there somewhere, a little light from a distant dimension burning in our present. She belongs in this particular patch of sky, shining over Laurens, Iowa, a small town not unlike Twin Peaks, with a similar community of faintly absurd, lost souls…and its fair share of ghosts. We’ll see all that clearly soon enough but for now we’re looking at stars, reflecting on the fact that we’re looking at the past, that each star is a pinprick of bright, dead light, haunting the darkness of our present.

RELATED: Is The Elephant Man David Lynch’s best film?

Suddenly we are hovering over a front lawn in hot afternoon light. The grass is almost oppressively bright. An obese woman fries herself on a recliner under the glare of the sun. Nothing about this scene is comfortable. Colors are shouting at us but it’s oh so quiet. So quiet. We begin to descend, at a slow, slow, creeping pace, very gradually advancing over the lawn and up to a darkened side window. Whose eyes are we looking through? Some sort of spirit? Death? That’s the natural assumption. We’re re-visiting the opening of ‘Blue Velvet’, surely, this time with a dash of Halloween. This stealthy creep around the outside of the house almost exactly retraces the steps of the young Michael Myers as he spies on his sister…his prey. Are we here to spy on prey? Are we here to kill? Just as we ask ourselves this question we find ourselves staring intently at the deep shadows behind the kitchen window. We hear something drop to the floor, followed by a heavy thud. Someone has fallen. Our presence has been felt.

We expect to be disorientated this early in a David Lynch film but we don’t necessarily expect to feel this strong sense of intimately inhabiting the insidious spirit of mortality. We soon realize that in doing this we are in fact inhabiting the spirit of the protagonist.

StraightStory2

When we finally see Alvin Straight lying on his floor, resisting the help of neighbors, we are struck by the mix of self-awareness and defiance in his face. He knows exactly what is wrong with his ailing body – he can sense it. But he does not want anyone else to make a fuss about it. He feels that as long as he can maintain it as his own silent certainty he can control it. The moment he accepts help, practical, medical or otherwise, it will become something bigger than him. His world needs to remain small, secretive. We will see several heartbreaking glimpses of this secret world as we get closer to him.

When Alvin’s daughter, Rose, returns home to find him still lying on the floor, with two neighbors looking increasingly pathetic and defeated, she naturally panics. Now, this is Sissy Spacek playing a woman who has remained essentially child-like. Her look of confusion and raw desperation as she brings her hands to her face belong to the world of horror, the world of Carrie. Thus a moment of great truth also becomes a moment of modern Gothic.

This scene epitomizes the way in which The Straight Story works. The story itself is remarkably true and the characters wonderfully real and while reflecting all this truth the film manages also to appear full of illusion and allusion. We see this at the key moment in which the plot, such as it is, is kicked into action. Alvin and Rose are sitting together in their front room as a dramatic storm flashes outside. In the expert hands of cinematographer Freddie Francis this is a Hammer movie storm, melodramatically enhancing an atmosphere of dread and assaulting the unquiet soul of this little house with restless spirits. The phone rings. We sense it is something ominous. So does Alvin. As Rose takes the call we watch Alvin’s intense features, a granite mask of certainty. He knows it is worrying news. He knows it concerns his brother. He knows this even though there has been no communication between them for the past ten years. He knows this because he is the insidious spirit of mortality. The spirit whose eyes we were looking through in the garden as he crept stealthily up on himself. The spirit who understands the precise nature of the relationship all those in his consciousness have with death and loss. Thus when Rose tells him his brother Lyle has had a stroke there is no flicker of surprise. Instead there is the vivid lightning flash of certainty and resolution (is this storm really taking place or is it a Lynchian illusion, an apt expressionistic psychological projection?). He knows simply that he and his brother must be reunited. The time has come to make a journey.

Now anyone who knows anything about this film knows that this journey is the stuff of legend. The real Alvin Straight traveled hundreds of miles from Iowa to Wisconsin on a tractor lawn mower. In Lynch’s symbolic hands this becomes a mythical odyssey through a haunted autumnal world. The vehicle in the film is a 1966 John Deere model. It has history. It has aches and pains. It is a shadow of its former self. It literally has great hills to climb. Man and machine are one. The insidious spirit of mortality will creep along The Great Open Road and everyone who encounters it will feel both a tug of compassion and a chill of recognition. Isn’t that just like life? This is the wonderful metaphor Lynch offers us. Riding his mechanical steed of gritty determination and gradual triumph, Alvin is both a questing medieval knight and a manifestation of the Reaper. It is no accident that his journey is punctuated by images of harvest. He gathers the souls of everyone he meets, not to claim them but to consider them for a while with the penetrating eye of his spirit, to draw from them their darkest truths. He leaves them slightly shaken but also emboldened, their sense of life and purpose re-affirmed.

You really need to watch or re-watch these encounters for yourself to get their full emotional weight. I want to focus just on one moment of Alvin’s journey to highlight the lightness of Lynch’s quintessential touch in this film. This is the moment when Alvin begins to notice cyclists flitting past him. At first it is the odd little streak of movement. Then Alvin gets off his mower, turns to get a full view of the long road and watches as a great stream of them rushes past him, each one with the almost intangible appearance of a wisp. They seem to have organically materialized out of the landscape, carried on the wind. There is a suggestion of the miraculous about them. There is certainly a sense of life, of energy, of youth. Alvin regards them with a wistful mix of admiration and yearning. He watches them all go by. And then he climbs back on his steed and sets about slowly catching up with them. Much later in the day, as he pulls in to the field where they are setting up camp, we see them gathering round him, applauding. Now it is their turn to be full of admiration. But, we reflect, is there not also perhaps a slight sense of fear? Here, after all, is the steel-willed spirit of time and age, triumphantly trumpeting the inevitability that he will catch up with all of us in due course.

StraightStory3

That is of course the point. But it is also the point that this moment is seen as a celebration. Ultimately it is the life that remains in Alvin that matters. It is that life that is being recognized, however compromised, however frail, however wrapped in darkness. The fire in Alvin’s soul blazes out of his beautiful eyes and lights everything around him. What still remains of the life in the leaves on the autumn trees burns with a rich, deep, strong flame. This is a film that slows us down until it aches to move. It forces us to be still while we think thoughts we don’t want to think, about grief, about time, about age, about weakness, about death. It forces us to creep up to our own side window and stare into the darkness at ourselves. But then as we look it assaults our eyes with simple, elemental images of such beauty that we feel our appreciation of life being refreshed, enriched by our brush with the spirit of mortality. This is a parable about the harvest which teaches us that walking in step with the reaper is the way to move through life. In short Lynch achieves the kind of spiritual transcendence in this film that Terrence Malick was reaching and straining to achieve with The Tree of Life.

Nowhere is that sense of transcendence more powerful than in the overwhelming final scene. If you have not seen the film I will not ruin it by giving anything away. What I must say is that in an ideal world people would watch The Straight Story as the second part of a double bill with my favorite film of all time, Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas. The connections would unfold slowly, beautifully, at a rich and very gradual pace, until finally this last scene would hit us as the near miraculous, revelatory epiphany at the end of a remarkable journey.

One could write separate essays on Richard Farnsworth’s extraordinary performance and Angelo Badalamenti‘s vital score, which, perhaps more than with any of the composer’s other organic collaborations with Lynch, is the heart and soul of the film. Let that provoke discussion! For now I have said enough. If you have not already experienced this film then rest assured it will catch up with you. That time will come. And you will feel your heart lifted when it does. Lifted by what is probably the most gentle, beautiful, truthful, compassionate horror film in history.

Buy The Straight Story here

The post In Praise of David Lynch’s The Straight Story appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

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How to Edit a Film Score to Best Serve Your Story

Sound design is extremely challenging, but these tips should help put you on the right track.

In most cases, indie filmmakers don’t have the budget to hire someone to score their films. This means that you miss out on the benefit of having a score specifically designed to match what’s going on up on screen, so you will have to figure out a way to do it with a piece of music that already exists. Though this is challenging, Kris Truini gives you a few helpful tips on how to pull it off, even if you don’t have much experience working with music, scores, and soundtracks.

Truini shares a bunch of great tips in the video, but perhaps the most important one is this: the score/soundtrack should serve your story, not the other way around. In other words, the pacing of the edits in a scene should be more important than that of the music.

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Monday, May 15 Filming Locations for Nashville, Love, American Crime Story, A Star Is Born, & more!

Here’s a look at some of the movies and TV shows filming on location on Monday, May 15, 2017: Filming in California TV Series: Major Crimes Stars: Mary McDonnell Location: 179 S Hudson Ave, Los Angeles (8:00 AM — 10:00 AM) TV Series: Love Stars: Paul Rust Location: 453 S. Spring St and 112 W 5th St, Los Angeles (7:00 AM — 10:00 PM) TV Series: The Fosters Stars: Maia Mitchel Location: Warner Brothers Studio, Los Angeles  Filming in Florida TV Series: American Crime Story Stars: Darren Criss Location: Ocean Dr, Miami Filming in Illinois Movie: Widows Stars: Viola Davis Location: 6100 W Belmont Ave, Chicago TV Series: Easy Stars: Jane Adams Location: 1200 N Damen and 1959 W Superior, Chicago Filming in New York‏ TV Series: The Tick Stars: Peter Serafinowicz Location:W 54th St and 5th Ave, NYC TV Series: Jessica Jones Stars: Krysten Ritter Location: Broadway Stages, Long Island City  TV Series: Shades of Blue Stars: Jennifer Lopez Location: Kaufman Astoria Studios, Astoria TV Series: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Stars: Rachel Brosnahan Location: Steiner Studios, Brooklyn TV Series: Mr. Robot Stars: Rami Malek Location: Broadway Stages, Brooklyn TV Series: Divorce Stars: Sarah Jessica Parker Location: Edgars Lane and Broadway,..

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On Location Vacations

Wednesday, May 10 Filming Locations for American Crime Story, The Fosters, Mr. Robot, & more!

Here’s a look at some of the movies and TV shows filming on location on Wednesday, May 10, 2017: Filming in California TV Series: The Fosters Stars: Maia Mitchel Location: 635 Mateo St and 1360 E 6th St, Los Angeles (6:00 AM — 10:00 PM) Project: Warner Brothers Untitled Noodle Project Location: 448 S Main St, Los Angeles (6:00 AM — 1:00 AM) TV Series: Chance Stars: Hugh Laurie Location: 600 S Mc Cadden Pl, Los Angeles (7:00 AM — 10:00 PM) Movie: Saint Judy Michelle Monaghan Location: 1335 Willow St, Los Angeles (11:00 AM — 5:00 AM) Movie: Beautiful Boy Stars: Steve Carell Location: San Francisco  Filming in Florida TV Series: American Crime Story Stars: Darren Criss Location: Ocean Dr, Miami Filming in New York‏ TV Series: The Tick Stars: Peter Serafinowicz Location:Broadway Stages, Glendale Movie: Stella’s Last Weekend Stars: believe this stars Nat Wolff Location: Beverley Rd and Westminster Rd, Brooklyn TV Series: Jessica Jones Stars: Krysten Ritter Location: Broadway Stages, Brooklyn TV Series: Shades of Blue Stars: Jennifer Lopez Location: Kaufman Astoria Studios, Astoria TV Series: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Stars: Rachel Brosnahan Location: Park Ave and 55th St, NYC TV Series: Divorce Stars: Sarah Jessica Parker Location: Silvercup Studios, Long..

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On Location Vacations

A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 30

This is the eighth year in a row I’ve run this series in April.

Today’s story: Airbnb Investigation.

What happens when renters spend their entire vacation solving the mystery of who their Airbnb host really is? A groundbreaking procedural drama you don’t want to miss.

Airbnb Investigation

This is a New Yorker satire, but it spun into this idea. Alexis and Ben are a young couple. Pull together their last dime to buy their first house. Now they could settle in, fix up their new home, and start trying to have a baby.

The really great thing about their new place: There’s a small guest house in the back. Since they live in a resort area, some 25 miles from Aspen, Colorado, they figure they can rent it out via Airbnb and really help with the mortgage payments. Hell, in the winter ski season, the research they’ve done suggests the income they make from their guest house rentals could double their income.

What could go wrong.

Their first few rentals go smoothly. Easy money! Then a reservation request from a couple from back East. Planning a trip to catch the fall colors. Seem like nice folks. Got great reviews from previous Airbnb stays.

So it is one crisp October day, Alexis and Ben watch through their windows as Rob and Dede let themselves into the guest house. Their own entrance, keys, parking spot. Probably won’t even interface with them during their stay.

That night as Alexis and Ben start to have sex — she’s ovulating so it’s peak fertility time — there’s a knock at the door. It’s Rob. Sorry to bother you, but it seems like the water heater isn’t working.

Ben trudges over to the guest house. Inspects the water heater. Hm. Pilot light had gone out. Odd. He relights it. Chats with Rob and Dede. Lovely couple. Good night.

Later Ben is asleep, Alexis beside him in bed using a mini-light to illuminate a book she’s reading which lists children’s names, what they mean, their derivation. She startles. Is that someone at the window? She edges over to the window. No one there. Peers down at the guest house. The porch light flicks off.

The next day, Rob and Dede show up with a bottle of champagne, thanks for relighting the water heater. The two couples have an impromptu night together, drinking and eating appetizers. They hit it off, so many things in common.

But of course, things go south from the ‘are they or aren’t they’ phase to ‘holy shit, they are’ realization that the real Rob and Dede isn’t this couple. Indeed a check on the internet shows that Rob and Dede are missing.

Apparently our bad guy and gal stay as Airbnb guests, do terrible things to their hosts, clean out their hosts’ bank accounts, then summarily dispatch them while taking over their names, finances, identities.

In the 80s and 90s, there was a sub-genre of movies known as The [Blank] From Hell. Time to resurrect it with the Airbnb Renters From Hell.

Or maybe do it as a dark comedy…

There you go: My thirtieth story idea for the month. And it’s yours. Free!

Each day this month, I invite you to click on RESPONSES and join me to do some further brainstorming. Take each day’s story idea and see what it can become when you play around with it. These are all valuable skills for a writer to develop.

See you in comments. And come back tomorrow for another Story Idea Each Day For A Month.

For other posts in my A Story Idea Each Day for a Month (2017) series, go here.


A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 30 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Dwayne Johnson Has Revealed More Rampage Story Details

Dwayne Johnson Has Revealed More Rampage Story Details

Dwayne Johnson has revealed more Rampage story details

Filming for the video game adaptation started on April 17, but star Dwayne Johnson has now arrived on the Atlanta, Georgia set and shared quite a bit of Rampage story details in a new Instagram post!

“Good to finally have boots on the ground here in Georgia for production of #RAMPAGE,” he says, adding: “I head up an anti poaching unit out of Rwanda. My best friend is a rare albino gorilla named, George. Very bad people infect George, an alligator and a wolf with a serum. All three animals grow at an unprecedented rate. Their size, speed, agility and violent aggression is off the charts. They go on a deadly rampage and want to destroy the world. George not happy. Me not happy. When animals like you, they lick you. When they don’t like you, they kill you. I will hunt down the bad people who did this to my best friend. And when I find them, I will not lick them.”

Johnson also said Weta Digital is handling the special effects: We have the best VFX monster making team (WETA) on the planet. Our actors and crew have been working very hard to raise the monster genre bar. As always, let’s have some fun. Let’s shoot.

Goin’ primal. Good to finally have boots on the ground here in Georgia for production of #RAMPAGE. I head up an anti poaching unit out of Rwanda. My best friend is a rare albino gorilla named, George. Very bad people infect George, an alligator and a wolf with a serum. All three animals grow at an unprecedented rate. Their size, speed, agility and violent aggression is off the charts. They go on a deadly rampage and want to destroy the world. George not happy. Me not happy. When animals like you, they lick you. When they don’t like you, they kill you. I will hunt down the bad people who did this to my best friend. And when I find them, I will not lick them. We have the best VFX monster making team (WETA) on the planet. Our actors and crew have been working very hard to raise the monster genre bar. As always, let’s have some fun. Let’s shoot. #PrimalDNA #George #Lizzy #Ralph #RAMPAGE

A post shared by therock (@therock) on

Dwayne Johnson and Naomie Harris star in the Rampage, an adaptation of the classic Midway arcade game. The cast also includes Malin Akerman, Joe Manganiello, Jake Lacy, Marley Shelton, PJ Byrne, Jack Quaid, Matt Gerald, Breanne Hill, and Jeffrey Dean Morgan.

RELATED: Joe Manganiello Shares a Marvelous Photo from the Rampage Set

This will mark the third collaboration between Johnson, producer Beau Flynn, director Brad Peyton and New Line, having worked on Journey 2: The Mysterious Island and San Andreas together as well. The latter film earned over $ 473 million at the global box offices, making it the most successful original blockbuster of summer 2015. Carlton Cuse (San Andreas) and his Colony co-creator Ryan Condal rewrote the Rampage script by Non-Stop screenwriter Ryan Engle.

Released in 1986, the original Rampage put players in control of one of three monsters: A giant ape named George; a giant lizard name Lizzy; or a giant werewolf named Ralph. The game saw the monsters running amok across the United States, fighting the military, and destroying key landmarks. Several sequels were developed for the title as well, adding even more types of monsters to the playable roster and extending their path of destruction into the cosmos and even back in time.

New Line will release the Rampage movie to theaters on April 20, 2018.

The post Dwayne Johnson Has Revealed More Rampage Story Details appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

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A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 26

This is the eighth year in a row I’ve run this series in April.

Today’s story: The Most Expensive Record Never Sold: Discogs, Billy Yeager And The $ 18,000 Hoax That Almost Was.

This is the story of a hoax that almost was. Its motivating force was a hunger for fame, or infamy, or whispered legend in a particularly American sort of way. It begins on a beach somewhere in south Florida.

Earlier this year, a test pressing (literally a test, for labels and artists to hear before ordering a full run of new record) of an unknown musician’s record was put up for sale on Discogs, a resale website popular with collectors. Two days later that test pressing almost became, at a price tag of $ 18,000, the most expensive album ever sold on the site, besting a record set last year for a sublimely rare Prince piece which sold for $ 15,000.

The lightning-fast turnaround on this record-breaking sale, however, seems to have been a fiction woven by the record’s creator. This morning, Discogs canceled the transaction.

Cover art for 301 Jackson St.

The album, called 301 Jackson St., was recorded by Billy Yeager, a Florida man who has pursued musical fame (or at least notoriety) for 37 years, by his own account. Despite a clear talent for guitar and a cosmically eccentric and dubiously effective knack for self-promotion, Yeager has been stymied repeatedly. The most eccentric — and ill-conceived — example of his promotional facility, bar none, came when Yeager spent two years planning and executing a hoax that would eventually convince a television station and a weekly paper to believe that he was Jimmy Story, the son of Jimi Hendrix, who was in possession of lost recordings from the psychedelic legend. To pull off the scam, Yeager dyed his skin brown. As The Miami Herald wrote in 1996:

The recently proclaimed, mumbling, mentally defective, cordovan-hued, long-lost love child of Jimi Hendrix is really a Swedish-blond, singing surfer guy from Hollywood beach.

Both the TV station and the newspaper were victims of an incredibly detailed hoax — including forged photos, signatures and birth certificate — that was two years in the making by itinerant surfer/musician Billy Yeager. He then called The Herald to claim, er, credit for the hoax, executed for attention.

Now, it seems clear that Yeager has attempted to perpetrate another hoax: He is, it seems, the seller who posted 301 Jackson St. on Discogs. He’s also likely the buyer. Which means that $ 18,000 never changed hands and also raises the possibility that the test pressing of 301 Jackson St. does not exist at all.

And, of course, the story takes place in Florida. Where else could it be? So what if a musician tried to pawn himself off as a descendant of Jimi Hendrix? What if he claimed to an unreleased LP of Hendrix recordings? He’s just a scammer trying to cash in to the tune of a few thousands dollars.

What if the shit hits the fan? Perhaps an obsessive, deranged Hendrix fan takes our boy (Chuck) hostage. Maybe a criminal outfit figure they can score big with a Hendrix LP, so they go after Chuck. Let’s toss in local police. The FBI. A private eye hired by the Hendrix family.

At some point and feeling the pressure, Chuck confesses the truth. But here’s the thing: All of the groups and people pursuing him don’t buy it. They figure Chuck is lying to get people off his ass. In fact, his denials may increase the pursuers’ belief that the LP is the real deal.

Put Chuck on the run. Chased by a half-dozen outfits. Throw several of Florida’s finest weirdos with whom Chuck intersects… voila! A comic tour du force!

There you go: My twenty sixth story idea for the month. And it’s yours. Free!

Each day this month, I invite you to click on RESPONSES and join me to do some further brainstorming. Take each day’s story idea and see what it can become when you play around with it. These are all valuable skills for a writer to develop.

See you in comments. And come back tomorrow for another Story Idea Each Day For A Month.

For other posts in my A Story Idea Each Day for a Month (2017) series, go here.


A Story Idea Each Day for a Month — Day 26 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

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