Jessica Chastain and Will Ferrell to Host Saturday Night Live

Jessica Chastain and Will Ferrell to Host Saturday Night Live

Jessica Chastain and Will Ferrell to host Saturday Night Live

Globe winner Sam Rockwell will make his hosting debut when Saturday Night Live returns on NBC for the new year on Jan. 13. His latest film, the Globe-winning Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, opened Nov. 10 and also stars Globe winner Frances McDormand and Woody Harrelson.

Halsey will join Rockwell, who is also marking her debut as musical guest. Halsey’s latest album, “hopeless fountain kingdom,” was released in June and peaked at #1 on the U.S. Billboard 200 chart.

Jessica Chastain will take the “SNL” stage on Jan. 20 as host for her first time. Chastain can currently be seen in Aaron Sorkin’s drama Molly’s Game, opposite Idris Elba and Kevin Costner.

Alongside Chastain, Troye Sivan will appear as musical guest for the first time. “My My My!” – the lead single from Sivan’s new album – was released last night. “Blue Neighborhood,” his 2015 multi-platinum debut album, topped the iTunes charts in 66 countries.

“SNL” vet Will Ferrell, who was a cast member from 1995-2002, will return to Studio 8H as a four-time host on Jan. 27. His latest comedy, Daddy’s Home 2, was released in November.

Chris Stapleton will join Ferrell as musical guest for the second time. His most recent album, “From A Room: Volume 2,” was released on Dec. 1. It follows “From A Room: Volume 1,” which won the 2017 CMA for Album of the Year and is nominated for Best Country Album at the 60th Annual Grammy Awards.

Saturday Night Live is produced in association with Broadway Video. The creator and executive producer is Lorne Michaels.

The post Jessica Chastain and Will Ferrell to Host Saturday Night Live appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

Saturday Hot Links

Time for the 318th installment of Saturday Hot Links, your week’s essential reading about movies, TV, streaming, Hollywood, and other things of writerly interest.

To Win an Oscar in 2017, You Have to Make the Movie That Speaks to the Moment.

National Board Of Review Winners: ‘The Post’ Comes Up Strong With Best Pic, Best Actress Meryl Streep, Best Actor Tom Hanks.

Gotham Awards 2017: Complete Winners List.

‘Lady Bird’ Takes Best Picture At 2017 New York Film Critics Circle Winners.

British Independent Film Awards: ‘Death of Stalin’ Wins Big in Craft Categories.

Here are the 110 feature films set to screen at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

Sundance 2018 Lineup Shows Timeliness is Essential.

Slamdance Sets 2018 Competition Lineup.

Variety Announces 10 Directors to Watch for 2018.

Why ‘Coco’ Feels Like an Act of Defiance.

4 Reasons Why ‘Coco’ Became Another Pixar Hit.

Pixar’s Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina on making ‘Coco’ feel authentic.

The Tricks Pixar Used to Make Coco’s Super Slick Skeletons.

That Long ‘Frozen’ Short Before ‘Coco’ Has People Irked: ‘Nobody Asked for That’.

‘Lady Bird’ Becomes All-Time, Best-Reviewed Movie On Rotten Tomatoes.

AFI Receives $ 500,000 Donation for Female Filmmaker Initiative.

WWE Studios Expands into Scripted Series, Animation, and Digital Content.

Disney sues Redbox to stop digital movie sales, in the latest feud between the companies.

John Lasseter and Beyond: How Does Pixar Get Out of This Mess?

Garrison Keillor Fired Over Alleged Improper Behavior.

How the #MeToo Movement Is Changing Showbiz Culture Worldwide.

Can the “Teen Sex Comedy” Genre Survive the Consent Era Reckoning?

How FCC’s Net Neutrality Repeal Would Rock Hollywood and Big Media: Winners & Losers.

Film academy releases new renderings of its museum on the Miracle Mile.

Ava DuVernay’s Visionary Filmmaking Is Reshaping Hollywood.

45 Guillermo del Toro Projects That Weren’t Meant to Be.

Freddie Mercury Movie Halts Due To Bryan Singer ‘Health Issue’.

Aaron Sorkin Goes Off Script: Fears, the Critics and His Private Battles Behind ‘Molly’s Game’.

‘The Post’: Screenwriters Liz Hannah and Josh Singer on Revisiting History with Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, and Steven Spielberg.

Robert Rodriguez Will Return to His Low-Budget Roots for New Feature With $ 7K Price Tag.

Paul Scheer Explains Why ‘The Disaster Artist’ Is ‘La La Land,’ But Reversed.

Onetime outsiders, ‘Disaster Artist’ screenwriters connected to a tale of following a dream — no matter how weird.

Casablanca at 75: Why we’re still quoting Hollywood’s most quotable film.

Another Sphinx Head Discovered From ‘The Ten Commandments’.

‘Godless’ Is So Good, You’ll Like It Even If You Don’t Like Westerns.

Netflix Unveils First Bollywood Film Project.

Netflix to Make its First Original Colombian Series.

Amazon Unveils Web-Based Tools for Creating VR and AR Apps, Characters and Scenes.

Listen: 3rd & Fairfax — The WGA Podcast (Episode 79: Darren Aronofsky).

Listen: Scriptnotes (Episode 327).

Screenwriting Master Class tip of the week

It’s not too soon to be thinking about courses I am offering through Screenwriting Master Class in 2018.

January 8, 2018 — Craft: The Coen Brothers and the Craft of Storytelling
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

January 22, 2018 — Craft: Story Summaries — From Loglines to Beat Sheets
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

February 5, 2018 — Craft: Handling Exposition
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

February 19, 2018 — Craft: Scene Description Spotlight
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

March 5, 2018 — Craft: Character Development Keys
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

March 19, 2018 — Craft: Create a Compelling Protagonist
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

April 2, 2018 — Craft: Write a Worthy Nemesis
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

April 16, 2018 — Craft: Scene-Writing Workshop
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

April 30, 2018 — Craft: Dialogue-Writing Workshop
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

May 14, 2018 — Craft: Pixar and the Craft of Storytelling
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

May 28, 2018 — Prep: From Concept to Outline
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

June 11, 2018 — Pages I: Writing First Draft
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

July 9, 2018 — Prep: From Concept to Outline
presented by Scott Myers

Learn More

I only offer my Craft classes once per year. Moreover the two Prep and one Pages I workshops I have scheduled in summer 2018 are the only times I will be leading group versions of these courses.

Consider the Craft Package: All 10 Craft classes for $ 40 per course. Exclusive access to the Craft curriculum. Automatic enrollment in each Craft class.

For more information, go here.

As always, I look forward to the opportunity to work with you!


Saturday Hot Links was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Watch: Meet the New Cast Members of ‘Saturday Night Live’ Season 43

New Saturday Night Live Cast Members

The 43rd season of Saturday Night Live is in full swing. We’ve already had three episodes with hosts Ryan Gosling, Gal Gadot and Kumail Nanjiani ushering in some laughs (be sure to check out our reviews of each new episode over here), and there’s plenty more to come throughout the rest of the year.

Throughout this season, we’ll be keeping an eye on the three new featured players making their debut on the show: Chris Redd, Heidi Gardner and Luke Null. We were introduced to them just before the new season began at the end of September, but now a series of videos from behind the scenes of the late night sketch series allows us to get to know the new Saturday Night Live cast members a little bit better.

Saturday Night Live had the three new featured players try to answer 43 questions (because it’s the 43rd season) in just one minute. It’s the fastest way for us to find out more about each of the cast members, even if they don’t get anywhere near hitting 43 answers.

Like many Saturday Night Live cast members, Redd laid his comedy roots in Chicago by doing comedy at Second City. There he was a member of the touring company and co-wrote The Art of Falling, an improv-sketch-dance hybrid show that was pulled off with Hubbard Street Dance Chicago.

Taking the advice of Judd Apatow, Redd moved to Los Angeles and in addition to his role in Popstar, he’s also appeared in the Netflix shows Love and Wet Hot American Summer: 10 Years Later. But you probably recognize him most from his scene-stealing performance as Hunter the Hungry in Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping.

As another Midwesterner transplanted to Los Angeles, Heidi Gardner hails from the famous comedy house The Groundlings. Currently, Gardner can be heard on the animation series Supermansion on Crackle, and in her series of questions, she shows that she’s quite the sports fan. Maybe that’s something we’ll see her show off on SNL in some form.

Finally, Luke Null shows that he’s not exactly the quickest on his feet, or at least not as quick as Chris Redd and Heidi Gardner at answering these questions. But since he’s from Chicago, I’m gonna cut him a break, and I’m pulling for him to make a splash on the series, something that can be extremely difficult to do for featured players in their freshman year.

The post Watch: Meet the New Cast Members of ‘Saturday Night Live’ Season 43 appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Saturday Hot Links

Time for the 309th installment of Saturday Hot Links, your week’s essential reading about movies, TV, streaming, Hollywood, and other things of writerly interest.

2018 Best Original Screenplay Oscars Predictions.

2018 Best Adapted Screenplay Oscars Predictions.

Are You Ready for the Most Exciting Oscar Race in Years?

A New Animation Festival Launches, With Plans To Impact the Oscar Race.

The 10 best movies to see at the 2017 New York Film Festival.

Fantastic Fest 2017: 26 Films We Can’t Wait to See.

MoviePass Is Luring Millennials Back to the Multiplex. Why Is Hollywood So ‘Meh’?

‘House of Cards’ Creator Beau Willimon Elected President of Writers Guild of America, East.

‘Star Wars’ Director Drama: How J.J. Abrams Jilted Paramount for ‘Episode IX’.

How the Russo Brothers Plan to Embrace Disruption in the Movie Business.

Rob Reiner and a Few Good Men Are Investigating Russia.

Celebrating Greta Gerwig’s Creative Rise.

Amblin Shake-Up: Michael Wright Stepping Down as CEO.

Fox’s Stacey Snider Gets Candid About Netflix, Diversity and the Future of Wolverine.

Sony Buys Into Simon Pegg and Nick Frost’s Stolen Picture Production Company.

CAA Promotes 4 Trainees to Agents, Executives.

Horrible Misogyny in the Film World Is Surfacing, But Are We Really Surprised?

The Decade’s Worst Summer Box Office Could Have Exclusion to Blame.

Female film casting same as 100 years ago.

Does ‘It’ Stand Up to Scrutiny on Second Viewing?

‘It’ to Pass ‘The Exorcist’ as Highest Grossing Horror Film Ever.

Psychological Horror Has Been A Thing Since ‘The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari’.

Why Linda Hamilton and Jamie Lee Curtis Will Save TERMINATOR and HALLOWEEN.

When the Nazis Tried to Exterminate Hollywood.

Director of Mel Gibson Movie ‘Professor and the Madman’ Seeks to Seize and Destroy Producer’s Cut.

What the 19 Movies to Ever Receive an ‘F’ CinemaScore Have in Common.

How ‘Mother!’ and More CinemaScore Failures Fared at the Box Office.

Darren Aronofsky Responds to ‘mother!’s’ “F” CinemaScore.

Mel Brooks Thinks ‘Blazing Saddles’ Never Could Have Been Made in Today’s ‘Stupidly Politically Correct’ Climate.

Martin Scorsese to Teach His First-Ever Online Filmmaking Class.

The 25 Most Important Families in Hollywood History.

Top 50 Film Schools of 2017 Ranked.

Foreign Film Upheaval: Why Esoteric Cultures Outpace European Mainstays at the Box Office.

In New Zealand, a Translated ‘Moana’ Bolsters an Indigenous Language.

Emmy Awards: Complete Winners List.

NFL TV Ratings Slide Worries Wall Street.

Pay-TV Losses Could Accelerate to More Than 5 Million U.S. Households per Year.

Nielsen Unveils New Ad Yardstick for Madison Avenue.

“The Deuce” Renewed for Second Season by HBO.

Damon Lindelof Begins Work on His ‘Watchmen’ TV Show For HBO.

There’s Yet Another Contender for the ‘Game of Thrones’ Prequel Throne.

Vice Video Employees Unionize With Writers Guild East and Editors Guild.

‘Firefly’ at 15: How a Canceled Show Became a Cult Favorite.

After 50 Years, Rolling Stone Will Go Up for Sale.

Listen: Scriptnotes (Episode 318).

Read: Review — ‘The Florida Project’.

Read: Jeff Willis — Profit Participation.

Watch: Baby Driver — A Lesson In Storytelling.

Watch: ‘Psycho’ — Ending Scene.

Screenwriting Master Class tip of the week

Whatever degree of importance you attribute to your script’s story concept… it’s probably not enough. Here’s how I begin Lecture 1 of my Core II: Concept class:

The foundation of any movie is the screenplay. The foundation of any screenplay is the concept. Therefore it stands to reason which story concept you develop and write as a script is a critical choice. And that is precisely why I created the second part of the Core curriculum — to understand how movie industry insiders think, provide you with proven methods to generate story concepts, and develop analytical skills to help you decide which ideas are the most viable ones for you to write.

Don’t believe me? How about this:

“Most aspiring screenwriters simply don’t spend enough time choosing their concept. It’s by far the most common mistake I see in spec scripts. The writer has lost the race right from the gate. Months — sometimes years — are lost trying to elevate a film idea that by its nature probably had no hope of ever becoming a movie.”

— Terry Rossio (Aladdin, The Mask of Zorro, Shrek, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl)

“Ideas cost NOTHING and require ZERO risk. And yet, oddly, the LEAST amount of time’s usually spent in the idea stage before a small fortune is dumped on a whimsy that’s still half-baked… Ideas cost nothing yet have the potential to yield inexplicably long careers and happy lives.”

— Kevin Smith (Clerks, Mallrats, Chasing Amy, Dogma, Zak and Miri Make a Porno)

In the Core content of The Quest, we work with eight screenwriting principles, and the second one is this:

Concept = Hook

On Monday, September 25, I will begin teaching Core II: Concept. In this 1-week online course, you will learn:

  • The lowdown on high concept
  • Genre, Cross Genres and Sub-Genres
  • Hollywood’s obsession with ‘similar but different’
  • Brainstorming and recycling
  • Gender bending and genre bending
  • How to test your story concept

And much more. The course consists of four components:

  • Lectures: There are six lectures written by me, each posting Monday through Saturday.
  • Writing Exercises: These optional exercises offer you the opportunity to workshop one of your own loglines and receive feedback from class members and myself.
  • Teleconference: We will have a Skype teleconference call to discuss course material.
  • Forums: The online course site has message boards where you may post questions / comments, a lively source of some great conversations.

For those of you who have not taken an online class, the interface is extremely easy. Plus online classes can be an amazing experience. Most of the activities you can do on your own time — download and read lectures, review and respond to forum discussions, upload loglines and track comments. In addition, I’ve been teaching online for over a decade and it never ceases to amaze me how much of a community emerges in such an environment with writers from all around the world including Europe, South America, Asia, and Africa.

I only teach my Core classes once a year and the 2017 cycle begins later this month. Everything you need to know about screenwriting theory in this unique curriculum based on eight principles: Plot, Concept, Character, Style, Dialogue, Scene, Theme, Time.

If you sign up for The Core Package, you gain exclusive access to the content in all eight Craft classes which you can go through on your own time and at your own pace, plus automatic enrollment in each 1-week online course — all for nearly 50% the price of each individual class.

“I’m a huge fan of Scott’s classes, and I signed up for his Core Package, which I cannot speak highly enough about. If anyone wants to take a serious look at improving their writing, there is more than enough material to keep you busy for a few… dare I say, lifetimes? He’s the best. No bones about it.”

~ Heather Farlinger

Here are the eight courses offered in the Core curriculum:

CORE I: PLOT — A one-week class which begins with the principle Plot = Structure and explores the inner workings of the Screenplay Universe: Plotline and Themeline. Start date: September 11 [Already offered].

CORE II: CONCEPT — A one-week class which begins with the principle Concept = Hook and examines multiple strategies to generate, develop and assess story ideas. Start date: September 25.

CORE III: CHARACTER— A one-week class which begins with the principle Character = Function and delves into archetypes: Protagonist, Nemesis, Attractor, Mentor, and Trickster. Start date: October 9.

CORE IV: STYLE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Style = Voice and surfaces keys to developing a distinctive writer’s personality on the page. Start date: October 23.

CORE V: DIALOGUE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Dialogue = Purpose and probes a variety of ways to write effective, entertaining dialogue. Start date: November 6.

CORE VI: SCENE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Scene = Point and provides six essential questions to ask when crafting and writing any scene. Start date: November 13.

CORE VII: THEME— A one-week class which begins with the principle Theme = Meaning and gives writers a concrete take on theme which can elevate the depth of any story. Start date: November 27.

CORE VIII: TIME — A one-week class which begins with the principle Time = Present and studies Present, Present-Past, Present-Future and time management in writing. Start date: December 11.

These eight Core classes represent decades of my work on the front lines of the entertainment business as a writer and producer, and engaging the craft as a teacher as well, over time pulling together a coherent, comprehensive, and cohesive approach to screenwriting theory.

This is not about secret systems or magic formulas, rather the Core content presents a story-crafting process that starts with characters, works with characters, and ends with characters. That process of engaging you with your story universe through your characters and getting you in touch with these living, breathing individuals informs every step of your creative process, leading you to story structure, themes, conflict, subplots, and all the rest. As I say, Character Based Screenwriting.

NOTE: I provide feedback and am actively involved in our online chats. That includes a 90 minute teleconference for each Core class.

Check out the Core Package to ground yourself in a proven, professional approach to screenwriting theory and practice.

To learn about any of the Core classes, click here.

I look forward to the opportunity to work with you!


Saturday Hot Links was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Saturday Hot Links

Time for the 308th installment of Saturday Hot Links, your week’s essential reading about movies, TV, streaming, Hollywood, and other things of writerly interest.

‘It’ Devours Competition with Record-Breaking $ 117 Million Opening.

‘It’ Makes Box-Office History, Sets New Bar for Horror Pics.

‘It,’ ‘Split’ and ‘Get Out’: Horror’s Star Continues to Rise at the Box Office.

Have We, As a Society, Reached Peak Scary Clown?

Toronto Film Market: Indie Distributors Struggle as Netflix, Amazon Look to Dominate (Again).

Toronto’s Diverse Array of Films From Africa Paint Bigger Picture of Continent.

Why Toronto Has Become Hollywood’s Go-To Source for VFX Movie Magic.

‘The Shape of Water’ Wins the Golden Lion in Venice, a First for Guillermo del Toro.

Telluride 2017 Report Card: Critics Rank the Best Films and Performances.

There Are No Frontrunners Yet, So Here’s Some Unsolicited Oscar Advice For Hollywood.

20th Century Fox Boss Stacey Snider Disses Netflix’s Original Movies.

Why the Marvel Movie Formula is Flawed.

Patty Jenkins is Now the Highest-Paid Female Director in History with ‘Wonder Woman 2’ Deal.

.J. Abrams to Replace Colin Trevorrow as Director of ‘Star Wars: Episode IX’.

Hollywood Has Reached Peak ’80s Nostalgia.

2007: The year dumb bro comedy died.

30 Highest Grossing Animated Movies of All Time Worldwide.

Celebrities Don’t Have to Pay You for Movie Ideas You Tweet at Them.

Millennials Do Care About Classic Movies, But Need More Exposure to Them.

Remembering ‘No Country for Old Men’, a Masterful Book–Movie Collaboration, 10 Years Later.

Why Rotten Tomatoes is Bad for Film Criticism.

It’s Time to Stop Applauding Biopics With This Horrible Cliché.

2017 is the worst fall TV season in recent memory.

Emmys 2017: The Full List of Nominations.

Creative Arts Emmys 2017: Winners List.

Cord-Cutting Explodes: 22 Million U.S. Adults Will Have Cancelled Cable, Satellite TV by End of 2017.

Scripted Series Snub Seniors, Study Says.

‘Game of Thrones’ Rarely Passes the Bechdel Test, and It Still Has a Rape Problem — Study.

Was Twin Peaks: The Return Worth It for Showtime?

All the Ways ‘The Deuce’ Will Remind You of ‘The Wire’.

How the Jeopardy! Writers Room Comes Up With All of Those Questions.

Watch: Sci-Fi: since 1902.

Watch: STEVEN SPIELBERG Opening Shots (1971–1991).

Watch: 10 Best Structured Movies of All Time.

Watch: A Male Eye.

Watch: High School Students Landed James Franco and Seth Rogen For Their First Short Film.

Screenwriting Master Class tip of the week

Whatever degree of importance you attribute to your script’s story concept… it’s probably not enough. Here’s how I begin Lecture 1 of my Core II: Concept class:

The foundation of any movie is the screenplay. The foundation of any screenplay is the concept. Therefore it stands to reason which story concept you develop and write as a script is a critical choice. And that is precisely why I created the second part of the Core curriculum — to understand how movie industry insiders think, provide you with proven methods to generate story concepts, and develop analytical skills to help you decide which ideas are the most viable ones for you to write.

Don’t believe me? How about this:

“Most aspiring screenwriters simply don’t spend enough time choosing their concept. It’s by far the most common mistake I see in spec scripts. The writer has lost the race right from the gate. Months — sometimes years — are lost trying to elevate a film idea that by its nature probably had no hope of ever becoming a movie.”

— Terry Rossio (Aladdin, The Mask of Zorro, Shrek, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl)

“Ideas cost NOTHING and require ZERO risk. And yet, oddly, the LEAST amount of time’s usually spent in the idea stage before a small fortune is dumped on a whimsy that’s still half-baked… Ideas cost nothing yet have the potential to yield inexplicably long careers and happy lives.”

— Kevin Smith (Clerks, Mallrats, Chasing Amy, Dogma, Zak and Miri Make a Porno)

In the Core content of The Quest, we work with eight screenwriting principles, and the second one is this:

Concept = Hook

On Monday, September 25, I will begin teaching Core II: Concept. In this 1-week online course, you will learn:

  • The lowdown on high concept
  • Genre, Cross Genres and Sub-Genres
  • Hollywood’s obsession with ‘similar but different’
  • Brainstorming and recycling
  • Gender bending and genre bending
  • How to test your story concept

And much more. The course consists of four components:

  • Lectures: There are six lectures written by me, each posting Monday through Saturday.
  • Writing Exercises: These optional exercises offer you the opportunity to workshop one of your own loglines and receive feedback from class members and myself.
  • Teleconference: We will have a Skype teleconference call to discuss course material.
  • Forums: The online course site has message boards where you may post questions / comments, a lively source of some great conversations.

For those of you who have not taken an online class, the interface is extremely easy. Plus online classes can be an amazing experience. Most of the activities you can do on your own time — download and read lectures, review and respond to forum discussions, upload loglines and track comments. In addition, I’ve been teaching online for over a decade and it never ceases to amaze me how much of a community emerges in such an environment with writers from all around the world including Europe, South America, Asia, and Africa.

If you sign up for The Core Package, you gain exclusive access to the content in all eight Craft classes which you can go through on your own time and at your own pace, plus automatic enrollment in each 1-week online course — all for nearly 50% the price of each individual class.

“I’m a huge fan of Scott’s classes, and I signed up for his Core Package, which I cannot speak highly enough about. If anyone wants to take a serious look at improving their writing, there is more than enough material to keep you busy for a few… dare I say, lifetimes? He’s the best. No bones about it.”

~ Heather Farlinger

Here are the eight courses offered in the Core curriculum:

CORE I: PLOT — A one-week class which begins with the principle Plot = Structure and explores the inner workings of the Screenplay Universe: Plotline and Themeline. Start date: September 11 [Already offered].

CORE II: CONCEPT — A one-week class which begins with the principle Concept = Hook and examines multiple strategies to generate, develop and assess story ideas. Start date: September 25.

CORE III: CHARACTER— A one-week class which begins with the principle Character = Function and delves into archetypes: Protagonist, Nemesis, Attractor, Mentor, and Trickster. Start date: October 9.

CORE IV: STYLE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Style = Voice and surfaces keys to developing a distinctive writer’s personality on the page. Start date: October 23.

CORE V: DIALOGUE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Dialogue = Purpose and probes a variety of ways to write effective, entertaining dialogue. Start date: November 6.

CORE VI: SCENE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Scene = Point and provides six essential questions to ask when crafting and writing any scene. Start date: November 13.

CORE VII: THEME— A one-week class which begins with the principle Theme = Meaning and gives writers a concrete take on theme which can elevate the depth of any story. Start date: November 27.

CORE VIII: TIME — A one-week class which begins with the principle Time = Present and studies Present, Present-Past, Present-Future and time management in writing. Start date: December 11.

These eight Core classes represent decades of my work on the front lines of the entertainment business as a writer and producer, and engaging the craft as a teacher as well, over time pulling together a coherent, comprehensive, and cohesive approach to screenwriting theory.

This is not about secret systems or magic formulas, rather the Core content presents a story-crafting process that starts with characters, works with characters, and ends with characters. That process of engaging you with your story universe through your characters and getting you in touch with these living, breathing individuals informs every step of your creative process, leading you to story structure, themes, conflict, subplots, and all the rest. As I say, Character Based Screenwriting.

NOTE: I provide feedback and am actively involved in our online chats. That includes a 90 minute teleconference for each Core class.

Check out the Core Package to ground yourself in a proven, professional approach to screenwriting theory and practice.

To learn about any of the Core classes, click here.

I look forward to the opportunity to work with you!


Saturday Hot Links was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Saturday Hot Links

Time for the 304th installment of Saturday Hot Links, your week’s essential reading about movies, TV, streaming, Hollywood, and other things of writerly interest.

Why Oscar-Winning Stars Flopped at the Summer Box Office.

Box Office: Hollywood Faces August Death March and a Bummer Summer.

Bart & Fleming: How Bad Was Movie Summer 2017?

Ken Ziffren: Profits Elusive for Studio Tentpoles.

Can Rotten Tomatoes Crush a Movie at the Box Office?

Box-Office Milestone: ‘Girls Trip’ Crosses $ 100M in U.S..

Emma Stone Tops Forbes’ 2017 Highest-Paid Actresses List.

‘The Conjuring’ Has Launched a Cinematic Universe That Actually Works.

Five Easy Steps to Making a Better Horror Sequel.

What the Koch Brothers’ Seeming Financial Gain From ‘Wonder Woman’ Says About Entertainment Discourse.

How ‘Baby Driver’ Exemplifies The Best of Genre Cinema.

Edgar Wright on ‘Baby Driver’ Blowing Past $ 100 Million, Making Original Movies, and Baby Driver 2.

China Box Office: ‘Wolf Warrior 2’ Wins Third Weekend, Marches Towards $ 700M.

German Box Office Recovers in First Half of 2017.

What China’s Latest Crackdown Means for Hollywood.

Hollywood Earnings Season Trends: Direct-to-Consumer, Cord-Cutting and More.

Netflix vs. Disney: Why the Companies Are Waging ‘Studio-on-Studio Violence’.

Can Disney Create a Netflix of Sports?

For $ 10 a Month, Unlimited Movies at the Theater Is Now a Possibility.

What Is MoviePass? The Pros and Cons of $ 10-a-Month Unlimited Films.

Can MoviePass Become the Netflix of Going to the Theater?

AMC Slams MoviePass, Threatening Legal Action.

Apple is in Discussions to Offer $ 50 Home Movie Rentals of Big Theatrical Releases.

Apple and Hollywood Pose New Threat to Sinking Movie Theaters With Digital Download Talks.

Weinstein Company Launches Mizchief Animated Film Label.

‘Star Wars’ Spinoff: Obi-Wan Kenobi Film In Works, Stephen Daldry in Talks to Direct.

These Australians Are Here to Scare the Hell Out of You.

YA Movies Get Real: Black Lives Matter, Activism Explored in New Projects.

“Hidden Figures” Inspires #HiddenNoMore Educational Exchange Program.

The Hollywood Insider’s Guide to L.A. Private Schools.

John Ridley on Politics, Superheroes and History Repeating in ‘The American Way’.

Miyazaki, Lynch, Soderbergh — why are so many directors un-retiring?

Steven Soderbergh Opens Up His Office and His Process, If You Ask the Right Questions.

When Did James Cameron Become Hollywood’s Blockbuster Punch Line?

6 Filmmaking Tips From Nicolas Roeg.

Amy Heckerling and Beyond: The Evolution of Teen Girls On Screen.

Alfred Hitchcock and The Terrors of the Bathroom.

John Cleese Disses U.S. Comedies, Donald Trump and Rupert Murdoch.

Setting the Scene: Screenwriter Kerry Williamson Discusses ‘What Happened to Monday’.

A Screenwriter Who Was Homeless.

What Made ‘The Shawshank Redemption’ Become The Highest Rated Movie On IMDb.

In a Body-Positive Moment, Why Does Hollywood Remain Out of Step?

WGAW Statement in Response to President Trump’s Comments on Charlottesville.

It’s the Golden Age of TV. And Writers Are Paying the Toll.

Tribeca Launches Its First-Ever TV Festival With ‘Gotham,’ ‘Will & Grace,’ ‘Queen Sugar’.

HBO Twitter Accounts Hacked.

Shonda Rhimes Moves to Netflix From ABC With Huge Overall Deal.

What Shonda Rhimes’ Big Move Could Mean for Netflix, Broadcast TV and Her Shows.

Hollywood’s new love affair with the internet.

Netflix Losing Disney and Pixar Movies: No Big Deal?

Apple Sets $ 1 Billion Budget for Original TV Shows, Movies.

Why Apple’s $ 1 Billion Investment in New Content Isn’t a Threat to Netflix — for Now.

Apple’s TV Content Push: Who Will Get a Piece of That $ 1 Billion?

Listen: Scriptnotes (Episode 313).

Watch: How To Make A Blockbuster Movie Trailer.

Watch: No Country For Old Men: Ending Explained.

Watch: Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark: Visual Echoes.

Watch: Movie Dancing 101 — a Supercut.

Screenwriting Master Class tip of the week

When I launched ScreenwritingMasterClass.com over 7 years ago, I created the Core curriculum: 48 lectures, dozens of insider tips, 250+ pages of my original content. It is a comprehensive approach to theory and practice, a deep immersion into Character Based Screenwriting, moving way beyond the typical formulas promulgated by so-called screenwriting ‘gurus’.

The Core curriculum has resonated with hundreds of writers, cutting through the confusion of all the different takes offered in ‘how to’ screenwriting books, providing a coherent take on the craft based on my 30 years of experience as a screenwriter and 15 years as a teacher.

I only teach my Core classes once a year and the 2017 cycle begins next month. Everything you need to know about screenwriting theory in this unique curriculum based on eight principles: Plot, Concept, Character, Style, Dialogue, Scene, Theme, Time.

If you sign up for The Core Package, you gain exclusive access to the content in all eight Craft classes which you can go through on your own time and at your own pace, plus automatic enrollment in each 1-week online course — all for nearly 50% the price of each individual class.

“I’m a huge fan of Scott’s classes, and I signed up for his Core Package, which I cannot speak highly enough about. If anyone wants to take a serious look at improving their writing, there is more than enough material to keep you busy for a few… dare I say, lifetimes? He’s the best. No bones about it.”

~ Heather Farlinger

Here are the eight courses offered in the Core curriculum:

CORE I: PLOT — A one-week class which begins with the principle Plot = Structure and explores the inner workings of the Screenplay Universe: Plotline and Themeline. Start date: September 11.

CORE II: CONCEPT — A one-week class which begins with the principle Concept = Hook and examines multiple strategies to generate, develop and assess story ideas. Start date: September 25.

CORE III: CHARACTER— A one-week class which begins with the principle Character = Function and delves into archetypes: Protagonist, Nemesis, Attractor, Mentor, and Trickster. Start date: October 9.

CORE IV: STYLE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Style = Voice and surfaces keys to developing a distinctive writer’s personality on the page. Start date: October 23.

CORE V: DIALOGUE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Dialogue = Purpose and probes a variety of ways to write effective, entertaining dialogue. Start date: November 6.

CORE VI: SCENE— A one-week class which begins with the principle Scene = Point and provides six essential questions to ask when crafting and writing any scene. Start date: November 13.

CORE VII: THEME— A one-week class which begins with the principle Theme = Meaning and gives writers a concrete take on theme which can elevate the depth of any story. Start date: November 27.

CORE VIII: TIME — A one-week class which begins with the principle Time = Present and studies Present, Present-Past, Present-Future and time management in writing. Start date: December 11.

These eight Core classes represent decades of my work on the front lines of the entertainment business as a writer and producer, and engaging the craft as a teacher as well, over time pulling together a coherent, comprehensive, and cohesive approach to screenwriting theory.

This is not about secret systems or magic formulas, rather the Core content presents a story-crafting process that starts with characters, works with characters, and ends with characters. That process of engaging you with your story universe through your characters and getting you in touch with these living, breathing individuals informs every step of your creative process, leading you to story structure, themes, conflict, subplots, and all the rest. As I say, Character Based Screenwriting.

NOTE: I provide feedback and am actively involved in our online chats. That includes a 90 minute teleconference for each Core class.

Check out the Core Package to ground yourself in a proven, professional approach to screenwriting theory and practice.

To learn about any of the Core classes, click here.

I look forward to the opportunity to work with you!


Saturday Hot Links was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Saturday Hot Links

Time for the 286th installment of Saturday Hot Links, your week’s essential reading about movies, TV, streaming, Hollywood, and other things of writerly interest.

Tensions Mount as Hollywood Braces for a Possible Writers’ Strike.

WGA Members Gather as Strike Authorization Vote Begins.

Writers Guild Edges Closer to Strike With Talks Suspended Until Next Week.

With a Hollywood Writers’ Strike Looming, Here’s What to Know.

An Aggregated Oral History of 2009 Films Ruined By the Last WGA Strike.

Netflix Tells Analysts It Will Be Hurt If Writers Go On Strike.

Summer Movies 2017: Every Sequel, Reboot and Remake Hitting Theaters.

Why ‘The Fast and the Furious’ is the most important franchise around.

Can the Marvel franchise survive without Iron Man?

Why Sony Has the Advantage Over Four Studio Rivals in a James Bond Bidding War.

Holy Overkill! Are there SIX ‘Batman’ Films Planned for 2019?

Hollywood’s Strong Run at China Box Office Set to Continue.

CAA, China’s CMC Capital Form CAA China.

Academy Scrambles to Avert Museum Disaster.

14 Kickstarter-funded Films to Screen at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival.

23 Must-See Movies at Tribeca Film Festival.

The 10 Best One-Location Movies, in Order of Size.

The End of Independent Film As We Know It.

How ‘Moonlight’ Altered NYC’s Indie Scene.

Documentary Sales Are Surging, But What’s Driving the Competition?

Netflix Keeps Buying Great Movies, So It’s a Shame They’re Getting Buried.

Netflix Nears 100 Million Subscribers, But Q1 Gains Fall Short of Expectations.

Arrival’s Eric Heisserer on Diving Into the Valiant Comics Universe in Secret Weapons.

Guillermo del Toro Explains Why Making a Monster Is One of the “Hardest Forms of Creation”.

6 Filmmaking Tips from Ben Wheatley.

‘Star Wars’ Writer Shares Story of Being Harassed on Atlanta Train.

Which Broadcast TV Shows Will Be Canceled and Renewed — and Which Are at Risk.

TV Upfronts Preview: Less Glitz and More Metrics.

As TV Quality Rivals Film, Showrunners Must Stop Being Embarrassed By the Small Screen.

Comedy Central Orders 3 Series — Including ‘The New Negroes’ — and 9 Pilots.

21 NBC Pages Turned Hollywood Players Tell All: Johnny Carson Sightings, Calls From the President, TV Cameos.

How to talk like a TV writer, as explained by David Mandel of ‘Veep’.

Six great TV shows to watch now that ‘Girls’ is over.

Netflix Claims People Have Spent 500 Million Hours Watching Adam Sandler Movies.

Cleveland Murder Highlights Perils of Video for Facebook.

Facebook To Review Content Reporting System in Wake of Facebook Live Killing.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Sets Sights on Augmented Reality.

Hollywood Is Losing the Battle Against Online Trolls.

Everything You Missed at Coachella 2017.

Megan Ellison’s First Annapurna Video Game Is as Quirky as Her Movies.

The Bitter Script Reader: Why Are We Compelled to Rank Movies in a Series with Each New Release?

Chuck Wendig: What I’ve Learned After 5 Years And 20 Books: 25 Lessons.

Scriptnotes: Episode 296.

In Its Third Season, ‘The Leftovers’ Makes Agnosticism Thrilling (Flavorwire).

‘The Leftovers’: The 9 Happiest Moments You Might Have Forgotten in All the Darkness (Indiewire).

“We can’t just be going through all of this for nothing”: The final season of “The Leftovers” finds its power in the confusion of loss (Salon).

The Leftovers’ Recap: ‘The Book of Kevin’ Is Riddled With Intriguing Mysteries (Variety).

TV Review: ‘The Leftovers’ Season 3 on HBO (Variety)

‘The Leftovers’: Justin Theroux on Kevin’s Sanity, Crisis of Faith, and the ‘Gratifying’ Finale.

The Leftovers Season-Premiere Recap: Stairway to Kevin (Vulture).

The Leftovers’ shocking season 3 premiere (The Week).

How ‘The Leftovers’ Exploded The Idea Of The “Mystery Box” Show.

Watch: Studio Ghibli — A Brief History.

J.C. Spink, Producer and Master of the Script Sale, Dies at 45.

Screenwriting Master Class tip of the week

Last September, I began a new chapter in my creative journey as an assistant professor of screenwriter at the DePaul University School of Cinematic Arts. As a result, I will only offer group workshops — Prep: From Concept to Outline and Pages I: Writing the First Draft —in the summer which means the next sessions I will lead will begin in June and July.

However I do have a handful of slots available for private one-on-one workshops including the premiere program I offer: The Quest.

The Quest is an intensive 20-week online screenwriting workshop which consists of three stages:

Core [4 weeks]: Participants learn essential screenwriting principles covering Plot, Concept, Character, Style, Dialogue, Scene, Theme, Time. There are 12 written lectures each week which post daily, then a writing exercise due Sunday to put the theory into practice. I wrote all 48 lectures amounting to over 250 pages of in-depth content and believe it to represent a new, cutting edge way to think about screenwriting.

The approach presented in Core is unique in these respects:

Coherent: Rather than a writer being forced to pick a bit of screenwriting theory from this guru or that, this educational resource or that, the Core content comes from a specific perspective — my own — based on over 25 years experience as a screenwriter and over 10 years as an educator. Every concept presented in Core is tied together by an overall philosophy about screenwriting, writing and creativity.

Comprehensive: The content presented in Core provides writers all the knowledge they need to have to be able to write a professional quality screenplay.

Character-based: Whereas so much of the conversation about screenwriting is focused on structure [and by ‘structure’ most people mean ‘plot’], Core presents an approach that begins and ends with character. In my view, this is not only the best way for a writer to craft unique, compelling, and entertaining multidimensional characters, it’s also the most effective — and frankly logical — way to find your story’s plot.

For 4 weeks in Core, participants in The Quest are immersed in screenwriting theory. At the end of that time, they put their understanding of those essential principles to work writing an original screenplay of their own.

Prep [6 weeks]: Starting with an original concept, participants in The Quest develop it through a series of 6 weekly lectures and writing assignments, each building upon the other until they end up with a thorough outline of their story.

I have been teaching Prep at SMC since we launched in January 2011 and the course has proved to be extremely popular. It picks up on the theory laid out in Core and runs with it in a workshop environment. The six weeks lay out like this:

The first two weeks are about exploration, starting with the Protagonist and a series of key questions to help define some of the narrative’s fundamental elements, then a full week’s worth of brainstorming, three different ways to prompt the writer’s creativity and engage the story.

The next two weeks are about wrangling the narrative, the primary Plotline points that provide the spine of the plot, and the movements of the Themeline, the story’s emotional plot.

The final two weeks are about constructing the structure, scene by scene, sequence by sequence, subplot by subplot until the participant has a detailed outline.

Armed with their outline, the writer can approach the page-writing part of the process with confidence, primed to type FADE IN and go.

Pages [10 weeks]: Using their outline as a guide, participants pound out script pages through a series of 10 weekly lectures and writing assignments. Averaging about 10–15 pages per week, by the end of The Quest the writer has a complete first draft of their original screenplay.

Here, too, the process is founded on the principles presented in Core and put into use in Prep, all reflecting a character-based approach to screenwriting.

As noted, The Quest is a workshop and that means:

  • Weekly writing exercises and assignments
  • Detailed feedback on all exercises, assignments, and script pages
  • Regular teleconferences

The Quest is not for everyone. It involves a big commitment in terms of time and — frankly — money. However the education gives writers a solid foundation in screenwriting theory and practice, all of it grounded in over 30 years experience as a professional writer and teacher. In my humble, it is superior to anything available. Here is one of many testimonials:

If you’re serious about screenwriting, you should already know you have a long journey ahead of you. Any chance you get to cross paths with Scott, whether it’s a one week class or The Quest, is a chance to expedite that journey.

Scott’s instincts as a mentor are spot on. He can tell the difference between when you need encouragement and when you need a good kick in the pants. Under his guidance, you become the kind of writer you want to be, the kind that doesn’t need to wait for inspiration.

The Quest changed my life. It gave me the structure to be immersed in screenwriting and the flexibility needed to write and accommodate work and family life.

The Quest exceeded my expectations. Not only did I come out with a quality screenplay, but a practical approach that I can apply to each script I write.

You can spend your time reading through screenwriting inspiration, tips or shortcuts, thinking it will help more than actually doing the work, or you can take the leap and do The Quest.

— Taylor Gordon

At present, I have room for two Questers. I also offer private programs for Prep: From Concept to Outline, Pages I: Writing the First Draft, and Pages II: Rewriting Your Script. If you’re interested, email me: scott at screenwritingmasterclass dot com. More information here.


Saturday Hot Links was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

The Best & Worst Sketches from Jimmy Fallon’s ‘Saturday Night Live’

Jimmy Fallon Hosted Saturday Night Live

Last night, Saturday Night Live went live coast-to-coast for the first time in the show’s 42-year history with host Jimmy Fallon. The late night sketch series seems anxious to capitalize on all the buzz their political satire has been getting lately with all the Donald Trump presidency fueling the writers room for a couple sketches each week, and they want everyone to experience the show at the same time rather than having half the country on a tape delay.

Though last night’s episode did offer some amusing moments lampooning the headlines that came from the White House this week, SNL was strongest with their non-political sketches, and that’s despite the fact that both Alec Baldwin and Melissa McCarthy returned as Donald Trump and Sean Spicer respectively. In fact, the best sketch mocked another headline-making even that had nothing to do with politics at all.

Check out the best and worst sketches from the Jimmy Fallon hosted Saturday Night Live last night.

The Best

Take Me Back – Normally I’d offer my commentary as to why this sketch was the best, but I can’t do that without spoiling the double punchline twist that comes with this sketch. If you start watching and you end up wondering where the hell this is going (like I did when I watched), just wait, and let it unfold. It’s worth it for the two huge laughs that come at the end, one of which features a surprising callback to another recent sketch from last week.

Before the Show – Anyone who has willingly participated in any middle school stage production knows how the expectations of students are nowhere near the final product of the performance that ends up on the stage. The dichotomy between the excitement these tween girls feel about their production of Legally Blonde: The Musical and the disaster that is the real show is both adorable and hilarious. Seeing how confident and happy they all are even after it fails spectacularly is also as funny as it is cute.

Basketball Scene – There have been plenty of instances where background extras are used to create humor by ruining a scene being shot for a movie, TV show or commercial. It’s an easy gag. But sometimes, there’s just no substitute for great physical comedy. In this case, seeing Jimmy Fallon and Mikey Day as trained actors who are trying to pretend to play basketball is just plain funny. I also love that line about studying “sports movement” at Julliard.

Continue Reading Jimmy Fallon’s SNL Review >>

The post The Best & Worst Sketches from Jimmy Fallon’s ‘Saturday Night Live’ appeared first on /Film.


/Film

The Best & Worst Sketches from Louis C.K.’s ‘Saturday Night Live’

Louis CK Hosted Saturday Night Live

This weekend brought Louis C.K. back to Saturday Night Live as host for a fourth time. There hadn’t been a new episode in nearly a month since Scarlett Johansson hit the stage in Studio 8H last month, so the writers and cast were refreshed and ready to go. The wait for a new episode was worth it, because with Louis C.K. on board as host, they delivered a fantastic episode where even the average sketches had more laughs than the usual middling ones and there were only two sketches that didn’t really work.

After the jump, we run through the best and worst sketches from the Louis CK hosted Saturday Night Live.

The Best

Birthday Clown – The way Louis C.K. plays this so straight is a huge part of what makes this work so well, but Bobby Moynihan does an amazing job of being on the verge of being scared and just going on with his show in this weird situation. Even though having Ernest turn out to be a weird killer is a solid ending, I was hoping it would go in an even stranger direction eventually. But despite that, the sketch was still the best of the night.

Pepsi Commercial – After all the uproar about this commercial, you knew that SNL was going to have their own take on the situation. Instead of taking the easy way out and making a new commercial in the same vein of the real tone deaf Pepsi ad starring Kendall Jenner, they followed the ad’s writer and director as he slowly realizes just how bad this commercial is going to be just before he shoots it. Finally, the sketch goes out with a bang by taking one final swipe at the clueless Kendall Jenner. Great stuff.

Soda Shop – The constant chipper 1950s tone of voice in this entire sketch makes the inappropriate advances by Louis C.K. and the manipulative, passive aggressive flirting from Cecily Strong is what brings the laughs. Even as Cecily Strong is slowly creeped out in the beginning of the sketch, her face looks uneasy, but her voice still keeps that upbeat attitude. Louis C.K. takes it to another level though when he keeps turning down the advances of Vanessa Bayer in a way that’s mean but sounds kind as ever.

Tenement Museum – With any other host, Tenement Museum may have just been an average sketch. It’s hard to know how funny the final sketch of the night really would have been if it was relying only on the jokes themselves, though the writing here is provocative and hilarious. But what really makes this sketch hilarious in this instance is Louis C.K. completely botching his Polish accent. I do wonder how much he’s intentionally leaning into making the accent bad (especially when he says “my wife” like Borat), but it doesn’t make it any less funny, especially with Kate McKinnon (who rarely breaks) unable to keep her composure. Louis C.K. even mocked himself in the goodbye at the end of the episode by doing the accent again.

Continue Reading Louis CK’s SNL Review >>

The post The Best & Worst Sketches from Louis C.K.’s ‘Saturday Night Live’ appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Saturday Hot Links

Time for the 282nd installment of Saturday Hot Links, your week’s essential reading about movies, TV, streaming, Hollywood, and other things of writerly interest.

Will Hollywood Writers Go on Strike: The Tricky Economics of ‘Peak TV’.

WGA Negotiators Call For Strike-Authorization Vote.

Fox’s Stacey Snider Mulls New Approach to Cash Break-Even Deals.

If Trump Kills the NEA, Independent Film Will Lose Much More Than The Money.

Seven Influential Filmmakers Whose Careers Were Launched By Federal Funds.

A New McCarthyism in Hollywood?

Artemis Women in Action Film Festival Announces 2017 Honorees.

Women in Film Adds Six to 2017 Board of Directors.

Asian Americans Saw More Movies Last Year Than Any Other Ethnic Group.

Disproving the ‘black films don’t travel’ Hollywood myth

Average Movie Ticket Prices Rose 3 Percent in 2016.

Appeals Court Rules TV Streamers Don’t Get Compulsory License to Broadcast Networks.

Disney Hit With Lawsuit Claiming ‘Zootopia’ Ripped Off ‘Total Recall’ Writer.

Jim Gianopulos Getting Greenlight Authority for Movies Up to $ 100 Million in Paramount Deal.

UTA Promotes 9 Agents to Partner.

Oscars: ‘Beauty and the Beast’ and ‘Get Out’ Meet the Voters.

‘Beauty and the Beast’s’ Secret to Success: Female Power and Comfort.

Disney Goes Down the Rabbit Hole With Possible ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Follow-Ups.

‘CHiPS’ — The Movie: Why a straight remake would be laughed out of the cinema.

Rogue One director explains why the original ending didn’t work.

Three Different ‘Rogue One’ Endings: Everything We Know About Each Version of the Final Battle.

Disney CEO Bob Iger Promises Long Future Of ‘Star Wars’ Movies.

Meet the man whose job it is to remember the ENTIRE Star Wars canon.

He believed in ‘Power Rangers’ when nobody else did, and it turned him into a billionaire.

‘Power Rangers’ Producer Planning Five Sequels.

Why ‘Logan’ is the Best Live-Action Version of a Disney Classic in Theaters Right Now.

The director of ‘Logan’ delivered a brutal critique of big-budget superhero movies.

We’re Living in a Golden Age of Onscreen Violence.

We Need To Talk About The Word “Remake”.

Screenwriter Zak Penn says his new ‘Matrix’ movie is not a “reboot” or “remake”.

Take a Number and Wait: Bureaucracy in the On-Screen Afterlife.

The uncanny disembodiment of Scarlett Johansson.

10 great fish-out-of-water films.

Brain Waves Can Predict Box Office Success, Study Says.

Dear Screenwriters: Please Scrap That Big Speech Where Your Hero Complains About Social Media.

‘Loving’ Director Jeff Nichols Launches Arkansas Cinema Society, With a Festival in 2018.

Michael H. Weber to Give Screenwriters Lab Master Class.

Bobby Farrelly Outlines His Problem With Modern Comedy: People Are ‘Thin Skinned’ and ‘Sensitive’.

George R.R. Martin Opens a Non-Profit Film Studio in Santa Fe.

Great Books That Hollywood Needs to Adapt Into Movies.

Noah Baumbach and Kenneth Lonergan Want to See Movies They’ve Never Seen Before With You.

Eraserhead: The true story behind David Lynch’s surreal shocker.

The Hollywood Exec and the Hand Transplant That Changed His Life.

Is It Time to Revive the Animated Live-Action Movie?

The 10 Greatest TV to Film Adaptations.

A Dozen Takeaways From the UCLA Entertainment Symposium.

Off the Beaten Path: Niche Subscription Video Services Between Boom and Bubble.

BS Renews 18 Series, Including Freshman Shows ‘Bull,’ ‘Kevin Can Wait’.

TV’s twisted love of time travel.

When Should You Punt on a Television Show?

‘The Leftovers’ Creator Damon Lindelof Encourages You Not to Binge TV Shows.

Why Most Early Channel Packages Aren’t So ‘Skinny’ After All.

TV’s Dead Zone: How the Cable Sector Is Killing Off Struggling Networks.

How Do You Get To Be a Showrunner?

Netflix May Pan and Scan Its Original Movies and TV Series to Better Accommodate Mobile Watchers.

Tim League Refutes Netflix’s Reed Hastings On Movie Theater Innovation.

Studios Flirt With Offering Movies Early in Home for $ 30.

Studios Prepare to Shorten Theatrical Window Before Home Viewing.

Binge Boom: Young U.S. Viewers Gulp Down Average of 6 TV Episodes per Session.

MGM Is Developing Original Shows for Snapchat Discover.

Apple Launches Snapchat-Like Video Clips App.

YouTube Loses Major Advertisers Due to Distasteful Videos.

AARP Studios Launches With Don Rickles Interview Show.

Twitter wants to start charging you for a slightly better Tweetdeck experience.

How the New York Times’ mobile-first strategy has turned millennials into its biggest audience.

Men Grin and Women Scream: A New Analysis of Gendered Words in Fiction.

Shakespeare Edited for the Trump Era.

Read: Neil Turitz — How About Building the Film Before We Build the Universe?

Read: Chuck Wendig — A Reminder Of What Makes A Real Writer.

Read: Chuck Wendig — So, You Wanna Be A Professional Writer? Some Considerations!

Read: New Yorker — Development Hell.

Listen: Scriptnotes (Episode 293).

Watch: Paul Thomas Anderson — Finding Purpose In Life.

Watch: Pixar — Image Computing (1988).

Watch: Stephen Hawking’s New Voice.

An Appreciation: How Chuck Berry Created the Template for Rock ’n’ Roll.

Chuck Berry, Key Pioneer of Rock ’n’ Roll, Dies at 90.

Chuck Barris, creator and host of ‘The Gong Show,’ dies at 87.

Legendary Daily News columnist Jimmy Breslin dead at 88.

SCREENWRITING MASTER CLASS TIP OF THE WEEK

In almost every movie, the most critical character is the Protagonist.

  • Typically the story is told through their perspective.
  • Their goal usually dictates the end point of the plot.
  • All the other primary characters are somehow linked to the Protagonist.
  • Normally they go through the most significant metamorphosis.
  • And the Protagonist acts as the main conduit into the story for a script reader and moviegoer.

So guess what? You need to create a Protagonist that grabs a reader’s attention and keeps it for 100+ pages.

How to do that?

That’s what we will be exploring in my upcoming 1-week online class “Create a Compelling Protagonist”.

Go beyond writing a ‘sympathetic’ Protagonist. Dig deeper than giving your Protagonist a ‘flaw.’ That is surface level writing. In this class, you will learn an approach that will help you immerse yourself into this key character, and craft a Protagonist worth writing… and reading.

This class not only explores proven ways to help you create a compelling character, it also lays out an approach you can use as the groundwork for developing the rest of your story.

Seven lectures, 24/7 forum feedback, insider tips, 90-minute teleconference, and the opportunity to workshop your story’s Protagonist [or Protagonists].

Plus if you’re a fan of the movies Bridesmaids, The Social Network and Up, we’ll be using those as our study scripts. They offer a diverse set of Protagonists and yet the approach we will study next week shows how a writer can craft such compelling and different lead characters.

It all starts Monday, March 27. You can learn more and sign up here.

Here are some observations from writers who have taken the class with me:

“One week of Creating a Compelling Protagonist challenged me in ways I couldn’t challenge myself. If you want to develop your ideas, this is a rare opportunity at great value. Thank you, Scott!” — Brianna Garber

“I’ve taken a ton of classes, both inside and outside film school, and this was one of the best. The material provided a ton of inventive ways to approach the development of a solid, three-dimensional protagonist, and helped me dig deeper into the character’s internal world — forcing me to reject easy solutions, the first ideas that came to mind.” — Jason Young, 2016 Black List Feature Writer Lab selectee

“Scott generously offers up his knowledge, insight, time and resources, so that in just one week a fully formed character can begin to lead you into your story.” — Ellen Musikant

“A class that is perfect for anyone looking to learn the primary character archetypes, their psychology, and how they relate to the protagonist. The lectures provide thorough examples of these character archetypes in modern and classic movies, and the online forums were a hotspot to ask questions about the material or anything related to screenwriting. Scott’s style of teaching is highly accessible to anyone, as he creates an environment of easy, open discussion on the subject of character and welcomes any other questions you may have along the way.” — Kristen Vincent, sold spec script “Fetch”

This 1-week Craft course is coupled with another class: Write A Worthy Nemesis. That begins Monday, April 10. For information on that session, go here.

This is the only time I will be offering these Craft classes in 2017, so take this opportunity and sign up now!


Saturday Hot Links was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

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