CS Interview: Jeff Bridges Talks Only Living Boy in New York

CS Interview: Jeff Bridges Talks Only Living Boy in New York

CS Interview: Jeff Bridges talks Only Living Boy in New York

ComingSoon.net had a chance to chat with Oscar-winning legend Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart, The Big Lebowski) about his new romantic comedy The Only Living Boy in New York, in which he plays an eccentric New Yorker. We also discussed his work in films like Tucker, Tideland, Starman and the upcoming Kingsman: The Golden Circle, as well as a potential new sequel to The Last Picture Show!

Amazon and Roadside Attractions’ comedy/drama The Only Living Boy in New York also stars Callum Turner (Green Room), Kate Beckinsale (Underworld), Pierce Brosnan (Goldeneye), Cynthia Nixon (Sex in the City), and Kiersey Clemons (Dope). It follows a recent college graduate adrift in New York City who seeks the guidance of an eccentric neighbor as his life is upended by his father’s mistress.

Directed by Marc Webb (The Amazing Spider-Man, Gifted) from a screenplay by Allan Loeb (The Space Between UsJust Go with It), The Only Living Boy in New York is now playing in select theaters.

ComingSoon.net: You took an executive producer credit on “Only Living Boy in New York.” What did that entail besides your usual skills as an actor?

Jeff Bridges: I got to be in on the decisions of the shoot and the style of the film. And I got to put in my views, and put in my vote for [lead Callum Turner] who was wonderful for the part really. He did justice for the story beautifully, I can tell you that.

CS: What was something specifically that sparked for you when you saw his tape or his audition?

Bridges: His acting! It was very real.

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CS: Yeah, for sure. And speaking of your character, W.F., I don’t want to spoil it for our readers because there is sort of a twist. How did you walk the line performance-wise so you didn’t tip the audience off?

Bridges: Well, you’ve seen the movie – and I love going to movies myself but I try to know as little as I can about movies that I want to see so I get to experience it fresh like the filmmaker intended. And that was how Mark [Webb, the director] and Allan [Loeb] the screenwriter did this. And there’s a wonderful device in the movie where you are wondering because my character is kind of mysterious. I love that the audience finds out that I’m [*redacted for spoilers*]. And so that satisfies the audience’s sense of mystery of who this guy is. That sort of put the kibosh on the surprise, but it is largely due to the fact that you think you discover the surprise.

CS: This movie is very much the kind of movie that Woody Allen and others used to do about Upper West Side, New York literati. Nowadays not only is that world sort of disappearing, but books in general seem to be disappearing as well. Do you think that is accurate?

Bridges: Yeah! It’s a sad thing that bookstores are disappearing. But it’s just inevitable that things change and nothing is permanent. It’s always changing, but you’re always nostalgic for the way it was. But when it changes there’s nothing we can do about that.

CS: Unfortunately not. One of the legendary bookstores still left in the city is The Argosy, which they show a lot of in this movie. Can you speak a little bit to your own relationship which books and maybe which authors had the biggest impact on you?

Bridges: Well the best part of going into bookstores is just being there for hours. Just looking around for books. And one of my favorite movies that I was in that did wonderful things for my career was “The Last Picture Show.” It was written by McMurtry, who was one of the best screenwriters as well writers of fiction and historical fiction. And it was such a wonderful book and I’m hoping that I get to continue the McMurtry saga of my character Duane. There are three more books in that series where “The Last Picture Show” was the first one.

CS: And then “Texasville.”

Bridges: “Texasville,” and then there’s two other books, so I’m hoping those work out.

CS: Are you actually in active development on that?

Bridges: Well, I wouldn’t say active development. I’m having dinner with Peter Bogdanovich tomorrow night so I’m sure we’ll talk about it, we always do. Maybe we can it get fired up. You know, it’s hard to get movies made! Our writer Allan [Loeb] was about to shift careers if this movie didn’t sell. And he had been trying to work with a director to sell the script for 10 years! So it is a tough road.

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CS: I remember when this script was on the Black List and this was considered a hot property. I remember when he was considered a hot writer and now he’s a veteran, but, this movie was written when he was much younger, and that brings up an interesting point actually. You have been doing this for a bit; this is not your first rodeo, you have read a bunch of scripts. What do you think is the biggest difference between the writing of an old pro and the writing of a hungry young writer?

Bridges: I don’t think there really is much difference. They can both be open and fresh. For my tastes in all of the arts, the most advanced artists have a freshness where it seems like it’s happening for the first time. When it seems like it’s happening for the first time, you think Picasso or something like that with the big things that you haven’t heard of before. And great writers have that, or you can have “psychic” powers where you could touch what hasn’t been touched before. I don’t know, but if you look at directors who had some wonderful success, especially with first-time directors, I don’t think it gets much better than “Citizen Kane.” Like, how old was Orson Welles when he made that? 25? So it goes the same with arts and artists across the board, the freshness and things like Sidney Lumet’s movies. I got to work with him too, where his later movies were just as fresh as ever.

CS: So if you do get to do the third “Last Picture Show” movie, is the plan to bring everybody back with Tim Bottoms, Cybill Shepherd and Randy Quaid?

Bridges: Sure, if we’re still alive.

CS: Well that would certainly be awesome. I think that what was cool about “The Last Picture Show” is that even when Peter did that movie, it was more of an old-school type of movie. That was during the era of “Easy Rider” and all these other counterculture things and he was doing a kind of throwback.

Bridges: To me, that movie kind of sits by itself. I can kind of see that he had these other peers, but it was made in a time where these kinds of movies weren’t being made and it kind of sits by itself in its own funny way to me.

CS: Yeah and I think now we are entering an era where movies like “Only Living Boy” and “Last Picture Show” are only becoming rarer and rarer when there are less movies about people and more about guys in super suits.

Bridges: But yeah I think we’re going to see more of these types of movies being made – Amazon is a good thing and I think that they’re planning on making more low-budget movies and not ones with $ 300 million budgets. More low-budget movies, I think, are more enjoyable to see.

CS: Yeah, do you they think they would be a good fit for “Last Picture 3”?

Bridges: Yes, that would be wonderful. Have you read those other books?

CS: No, I haven’t.

Bridges: Cool, if you’re a fan of McMurtry, they’re really very terrific stories.

CS: He was one of the best for sure. One of my favorite movies of yours that I don’t really hear talked about much is “Tucker: The Man and His Dream.” The themes of “the innovator versus the forces of Industry” are so powerful and still horribly relevant.

Bridges: You don’t say.

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CS: Can you talk a little bit about that movie and also about working with the late Martin Landau?

Bridges: Yeah gosh, I have such fond memories making that movie. My father also was working on that movie. We made a couple of films and it was one of the times I got to work with him as an adult so that was wonderful. And Francis [Ford Coppola], gosh, what working with him was like. What an amazing artist he is. He got me going on that movie. I can talk for hours about how innovative he was, what he did. Martin Landau and I became close with him on that film, he was such a wonderful actor and such a generous person. And Francis, one of the things he did for our relationship in the movie is he said, “How do you think you guys met?” We talked and created this story about how we met on the train, he was an old man and I bummed a cigarette off him, and we started up a conversation or whatever. And then Francis said, “Why don’t we start up an improv of that meeting right now.” And we were going on for about five or ten minutes and he set up chairs for us to use as the train. We did the improv and Francis said, “We won’t do it anymore, it will be just that one time, but now that’s in your brain I don’t have to make up how you did it. You’ve got that story actually in your brain, it really happened.” And that’s an example of what Francis did which brought us a little bit closer together. You know, playing our parts getting to know each other better.

CS: What is interesting for me about that movie is that Martin had been in the weeds career-wise for awhile and that movie very much brought him back. After that he did “Crimes and Misdemeanors,” “Ed Wood” got an Oscar, all that good stuff. You think he knew that that part was a turning point for him?

Bridges: Yes, I think he did know.

CS: I also want to talk to you about a film of yours that I don’t think gets enough ink, which is “Tideland.” That’s a doozy that movie. I’m a huge Terry Gilliam fan and I loved the book the movie was based on, but I think it is a challenging movie for even some of the more hardcore Gilliam people. Are you a fan of that film?

Bridges: I am, it’s probably the weirdest movie I ever got involved with. I must say it’s also the weirdest one of Terry’s, I would think.

CS: Which is saying something.

Bridges: It was so bizarre, but I had a ball doing it. And Terry is a huge master of sublimity. He’s been working on that “Quixote” movie for God knows how many years.

CS: I remember when you narrated the documentary.

Bridges: You are right about that!

CS: But “Tideland” definitely has some people who are passionate about it like me. What do you think made audiences react so violently to it when it came out come?

Bridges: Well, there is this little girl who starts shooting up her dad… starts shoving doll hairs up her father’s carcass. (laughs)

CS: It was a little too much for people, but I love you in it and I love that movie.

Bridges: It was also where I got to sing a song by my friend in the opening scene, and it always puts a smile on my face.

Jeff Bridges i Kingsman- The Golden Circle

CS: I was also lucky enough to get to see the first 30 minutes of “Kingsman: Golden Circle.” It’s very wild stuff, but I think I did not actually get to see any part of your scenes with the Statesman. I was curious, what excited you about doing that project?

Bridges: Well I was a big fan of the first one. It was the best spy-genre-James-Bond-type film that I’ve ever seen. It was executed so brilliantly by Matthew Vaughn, and they do all the special effects now and used them in a really brilliant way like the first one. And when I got invited to be a part of this one — which they never really like to call it a sequel, they always want to call it an extension of the first story — I said “Okay, let’s go.” And I play the head of an organization called the Statesman, which is the American version of the Kingsman.

CS: Yeah, you are with Channing Tatum and all that. It was just interesting to me that you chose that because outside of “TRON” and I guess “Texasville,” I don’t really see you as a big franchise guy. Was it something that you tried to avoid in your career?

Bridges: No, no, I mean, I was in the first “Iron Man” which was a franchise.

CS: True.

Bridges: Also, doing the “TRON” movie was big, but I am game for all of the different formats, you know. I guess I’ll probably do virtual reality when it comes up. The question is if theaters will be taken away soon, will we all be watching movies on our iPhones?

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CS: If you were to go over your entire filmography and make a sequel to any one of the movies you’ve done, which one would you want to revisit the most?

Bridges: I was kind of surprised that they never did one for “Starman” because it was all set up for one. Karen Allen is pregnant with the “Star Baby” and there’s a silver ball with the kid. Whenever I see Karen, we always jam about different ideas for a sequel.

CS: Like where did her character go? Where is her kid?

Bridges: I heard that there were talks for making a remake, but I still think that they should have made a sequel and stuff.

CS: That movie was always fascinating, because I am a big John Carpenter fan, and that was one of the only movies he got to make that really showed his breadth, that he wasn’t just a horror filmmaker.

Bridges: Yeah, I think so too.

CS: He had this really great facility with comedy – it was rather Howard Hawksian in that way with the romance there. Do you have any other memories of working with him?

Bridges: Yeah, he was terrific. I remember, I always had these ideas, and I would come up to him with my ideas and then he would look at me sometimes with an implacable expression on his face and he would say, “Yeah, but what do you know?” (laughs)

The post CS Interview: Jeff Bridges Talks Only Living Boy in New York appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

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Tim Cook’s iPhone anniversary tweet has a hidden detail only Apple nerds will notice

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Tim Cook just acknowledged the iPhone’s tenth anniversary in the most Apple way possible.

«Here’s to the #iPhone that changed the world, to the man who dreamed it & the people at Apple who have never stopped looking to its future,» the CEO wrote. 

That may sound like a pretty straightforward sentiment given the occasion, but there’s more to the tweet than meets the eye. The tweet was sent at exactly 9:41 a.m., which careful observers will notice matches up with the time on the image of the original iPhone in Cook’s tweet. That’s not a coincidence. Read more…

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David Oyelowo Joins Blumhouse’s Only You from Jacob Estes

David Oyelowo Joins Blumhouse's Only You from Jacob Estes

David Oyelowo Joins Jacob Estes’ Blumhouse film Only You

Blumhouse is gearing up for its newest film Only You from writer Jacob Estes, who will both write and direct the project. Deadline is reporting that Selma star David Oyelowo has just been cast in the film. Though there is little information about Only You yet, it’s being called a thriller involving time travel.

Jason Blum from Blumhouse will produce Only You. Executive producing are Oyelowo, Couper Samuelson, Jeanette Volturno and Jay Martin. Blumhouse has had major successes in recent days with Get Out, which is the second-highest grossing horror film of all time after 1973’s The Exorcist. M. Night Shyamalan’s Split is another recent success for Blumhouse.

Golden Globe nominee David Oyelowo is known for playing Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Selma and appearing in Nightingale, for which he was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie and a Golden Globe for Best Actor, Lee Daniel’s The ButlerThe Queen of Katwe and Jack Reacher. He’s also known for voicing the role of Agent Kallus in the animated series Star Wars Rebels, which was renewed for a fourth and final season, as announced at this weekend’s Star Wars Celebration in Orlando, Florida. Oyelowo received a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama for his role in Selma.

Estes is known for writing and directing the short Summoning, as well as the film Mean Creek, which won two Independent Spirit Awards and a Humanitas Prize. He’s also written The Details, starring Tobey Maguire, Laura Linney, Kerry Washington and Elizabeth Banks. He wrote the screenplay for Paramount Pictures’ Rings.

Are you guys excited to see what Only You has in store? What Blumhouse film is your favorite? Are you happy about the casting of David Oyelowo? Let us know in the comments or tweet us @ComingSoonnet.

The post David Oyelowo Joins Blumhouse’s Only You from Jacob Estes appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

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Dress shoes for children are the only shoes I want to wear

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Get the wedges away from me — the only shoes I want to wear this spring are children’s dress shoes. Yes, the ones you see at Payless, et al during Easter season.

Unfortunately, this is not a goal I can achieve. I did not appropriately revel in wearing these chunky, low-heeled, white Mary Janes when I was an actual child. Now, it is too late for me and my size 9s. Kids’ shoes simply will not fit, no matter how much I want to wear them.

But if you have been blessed with feet that fit a women’s size 8-ish or below, you can achieve my dream for me. (And, please, do not suggest that I wear «adult versions» of these shoes. They are not the same.) Read more…

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Watch: How to Create a Realistic VFX Army From Only One Person

Under Armour’s viral ‘Rule Yourself’ campaign was created using state-of-the-art technology and old-fashioned ingenuity.

Under Armour’s inspiring ‘Rule Yourself’ campaign, featuring Misty Copeland, Stephen Curry, and Jordan Spieth, and produced in collaboration with Droga5 and director Wally Pfister, features an army of athletes training. But there wasn’t enough time or resources to film hundreds of people. So how did they pull it off?

In a new video, production company The Mill shows how its employees cloned the athletes with plates, clever camera usage, and VFX.

To create the crowd of people, the company first rigged a five-camera array that maximized the number of plates they could shoot. While setting up, they had to ensure the cameras were evenly spaced and that the plates didn’t overlap. Once they had cast extras who could perform the athletic drills necessary for the shoot, The Mill matched the extras’ skin tone and hair to the athlete they wanted to duplicate.

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Tutorial: Create an Exploding Bokeh Effect That Only Comes Out at Night

Bokeh is beautiful, especially when it’s exploding.

If you’re a fan of interesting looking bokeh, then you’ll want to check out the latest video from Mathieu Stern, the Master of Weird Lenses. In it, he creates a reverse globular lens out of cheap Russian glass to create some stunning bokeh effects that are pretty amazing in the day, but like most things in life, get way better at night.

This video might be more helpful if you’re trying to get step-by-step instructions on how to do this to your own lens:

Stern uses a Mir 1B 37mm f2.8, an inexpensive Russian lens. To achieve the effect, all you really have to do is remove the front of the lens and turn it around before reattaching it. This creates an interesting look; the center will be the only thing in focus, much like a tilt shift lens, except the bokeh will look as though they’re «exploding.»

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Only Have $150? Here’s a Complete LED Light Kit That You Can Afford

If you’ve got almost no budget for lighting, this kit might just give you what you need for just $ 150.

Plenty of us are out there trying to ball on a budget, but when you barely have two pennies to rub together, purchasing a lighting kit seems almost entirely out of the question. Almost. In the latest video in his budget lighting series, Caleb Pike of DSLR Video Shooter shows you how to put together a super budget-friendly light kit for just $ 150, complete with powerful LEDs, light stands, and batteries. Check it out below:

Pike’s $ 150 kit includes:

  • NEEWER CN-304 LED light ($ 56)
  • NEEWER CN-160 LED light ($ 33)
  • Battery Kit (Includes 2 batteries and a charger) ($ 34)
  • Light Stand Kit (includes 2 stands) ($ 26)
  • Umbrella ($ 11)
  • Umbrella mount ($ 7-$ 11)
  • Diffusion ($ 0-$ 8)

(For links to each piece of equipment, check out the description in the video.)

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Producers Confirm Game of Thrones’ Final Season Only 6 Episodes

Producers Confirm Game of Thrones' Final Season Only 6 Episodes

Producers confirm Game of Thrones’ final season only 6 episodes

While taking part at a panel at SXSW this weekend, Game of Thrones executive producers David Benioff and D.B. Weiss confirmed what had previously been rumored, that the eighth and final season of the series will have just six episodes.

“It’s only going to be six episodes for the final season,” Benioff said (via EW). “From the beginning we’ve wanted to tell a 70-hour movie. It will turn out to be a 73-hour movie, but it’s stayed relatively the same of having the beginning, middle and now we’re coming to the end. It would have been really tough if we lost any core cast members along the way, I’m very happy we’ve kept everyone and we get to finish it the way we want to.”

The pair also confirmed that they won’t be involved with any prequel or spin-off series that HBO may pursue after the completion of the series.

“I think HBO might well do [another series] and I look forward to watching it and I think it be great, but I think they should get new blood in,” Benioff said.

Finally, as a fun bit of trivia, the producers confirmed that musician Ed Sheeran will have a cameo in the upcoming seventh season, something they’ve been trying to do as a surprise for star Maisie Williams for many years.

Game of Thrones‘ upcoming seventh season will consist of just seven episodes and is set to premiere on July 16, 2017.

The executive producers of Game of Thrones Season 7 are David Benioff, D.B. Weiss, Carolyn Strauss, Frank Doelger and Bernadette Caulfield; co-executive producers are Guymon Casady, Vince Gerardis, George R.R. Martin and Bryan Cogman; and producers are Chris Newman, Greg Spence and Lisa McAtackney.

The post Producers Confirm Game of Thrones’ Final Season Only 6 Episodes appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

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Trivia: Michael Jackson Wanted to Play Professor X in ‘X-Men’, and He Wasn’t the Only Pop Star to Audition

Michael Jackson Auditioned for X-Men

The X-Men franchise began back in 2000, and since it was the first time the Marvel Comics property was being brought to the big screen, there was a lot of buzz about who should be cast in the various mutant roles of the titular superhero team. For example, Viggo Mortensen revealed not too long ago that he turned down the role of Wolverine due to a commitment he had to another project. While we’ll always wonder how awesome that would have been, we couldn’t be happier that Australian actor Hugh Jackman ended up being launched into stardom by taking the role that he would go on to play for 17 years.

Beyond that though, you might be surprise to hear that there were some mind-blowing contenders who came in to read for various roles in the first X-Men movie. Believe it or not, Michael Jackson, the King of Pop, came in to audition for Professor X. And he wasn’t the only chart-topping singer looking to play one of the Marvel mutants.

Learn about how Michael Jackson auditioned for X-Men and other surprising contenders after the jump.

The Hollywood Reporter recently talked to former X-Men franchise writer David Hayter, who was there at the beginning of 20th Century Fox’s development of the first film. While talking about the creative process for the first movie, Hayter revealed some surprising names who were brought in to audition for roles, and a couple stars who they wanted for roles, but ended up unaffordable at the time.

On the pop star front, Hayter revealed that Michael Jackson came in to audition because he wanted to play Professor X. Meanwhile, his sister Janet Jackson was brought in to audition for Storm. And she wasn’t the only singer trying to land the role, because Mariah Carey was looking to spark her acting career as the weather-controlling mutant as well. In addition, Glenn Danzig, the founder of rock bands such as Misfits, Samhain, and Danzig, came in to audition for Wolverine.

Thankfully, chart-topping singers weren’t the only talents being sought to play mutants. There were professional athletes too! Shaquille O’Neal, who had already played the superhero known as Steel, once read for a role. One would think he might make for an interesting alternate choice to play Colossus, for obvious reasons. Instead, he was interested in playing Bishop, a charater who wouldn’t appear in an X-Men movie until X-Men: Days of Future Past in 2014 when he was played by Omar Sy.

Other notable candidates included Terence Stamp for Professor X, who would have made an interesting mutant leader. There was once a chance of ending up with Angela Bassett as Storm, but her agents wanted more money than 20th Century Fox could afford at the time. They ran into the same issue when they wanted She’s All That star Rachael Leigh Cook to play Rogue.

In the end, I think all of the casting for X-Men worked out for the best, with the exception of Tyler Mane as Sabretooth and Ray Park as Toad, neither of whom brought anything except a physical presence to the table. At the very least, I’m glad most of the aforementioned names didn’t end up with the roles they auditioned for. That might have doomed the X-Men franchise from the beginning, and who knows which movie would have been the one to launch the comic book movie craze after that.

The post Trivia: Michael Jackson Wanted to Play Professor X in ‘X-Men’, and He Wasn’t the Only Pop Star to Audition appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Get free flights to New Zealand, y’all. But only if you accept a job interview

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If you’re working in the tech world, New Zealand wants YOU. Specifically, the city of Wellington — self-titled tech and innovation capital of the South Pacific. 

A program called Looksee Wellington is giving 100 people free flights and accommodation to check out the city for a week. But there’s a catch. 

The city is yours to visit and explore, but you’ll also need to commit to pre-arranged job interviews with tech companies in the area.

The city is home to companies like accounting software group Xero and Weta Digital, who did the visual effects in Avatar and Lord of the Rings. Read more…

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