Recommended Cinema for November 19-November 25, 2017

This calendar is a new addition to NotComing.com, and is updated each Sunday with suggested screenings for the upcoming week. Currently, the calendar contains listings for , , , , , , , and . Others will be added in the future, and if you’re interested in curating a calendar in your part of the world, !
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Daily Dialogue — November 14, 2017

Henry: Well, kid, you beat him.
Johnny: You’re right, Henry. It’s not enough.

Then he laughs.

Johnny: But it’s close.

The Sting (1973), written by David S. Ward

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Celebration.

Trivia: Paul Newman’s role, Henry Gondorff, was written for an overweight, past one’s prime slob, and was a minor character. He was only in about half of David S. Ward’s original screenplay, and was intended to be an older, paunchier fellow-a sort of gruff mentor to Johnny Hooker. The producers originally envisioned Peter Boyle to play the role, but Paul Newman loved the screenplay and was eager to play Gondorff. Ultimately, Ward slimmed down the character and beefed up the role to fit Newman.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Amidst the general celebration by all the guys who pulled off this con, this exchange between Henry (Paul Newman) and Johnny (Robert Redford) is a nice capstone.


Daily Dialogue — November 14, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Recommended Cinema for November 12-November 18, 2017

This calendar is a new addition to NotComing.com, and is updated each Sunday with suggested screenings for the upcoming week. Currently, the calendar contains listings for , , , , , , , and . Others will be added in the future, and if you’re interested in curating a calendar in your part of the world, !
NotComing.com | Recent Updates

Daily Dialogue — November 10, 2017

“Take the draw.”

Searching for Bobby Fischer (1994), screenplay by Steve Zaillian, book by Fred Waitzkin

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Competition [Non-Sports], suggested by Denise Garcia.

Trivia: The character of Jonathan Poe (Josh’s young rival) was based on real life young chess prodigy Jeff Sarwer. In the National Primary Championship which the climax of the film is based on, Josh and Jeff actually tied for first place, after which Josh won on tie-breaks. While Sarwer would go on to win the World Championship Under 10, he soon disappeared with his sister and father; the family was known for living a travelling lifestyle (no permanent address, etc.)

Dialogue On Dialogue: It’s such a great moment, the calm before the storm. Josh knows he’s won. His rival thinks he’s won. However, two completely different moods from the boys: Josh willing to share the title, Jonathan intent on winning. A quiet few seconds before a beautifully rhythmic Final Struggle.


Daily Dialogue — November 10, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Recommended Cinema for November 05-November 11, 2017

This calendar is a new addition to NotComing.com, and is updated each Sunday with suggested screenings for the upcoming week. Currently, the calendar contains listings for , , , , , , , and . Others will be added in the future, and if you’re interested in curating a calendar in your part of the world, !
NotComing.com | Recent Updates

Daily Dialogue — November 7, 2017

Tiffany: Walk across the room.
Pat: Can we do something else besides the dance deal?
Tiffany: Are you fucking kidding me?
Pat: I’m good with a hammer. You want me to fix something?
Tiffany: A deal is a deal.
Pat: I know, okay, I was just suggesting if there’s a better scenario.

Tiffany turns away from him.

Tiffany: Why don’t you… walk towards me like I’m Nikki. And the only way you can convey how much you missed me is by your walk, by your slow walk. You can’t talk, only walk.
Pat: No.
Tiffany: Do it.
Pat: It’s stupid.
Tiffany: No walk, no letter. Walk to me like I’m Nikki. Do it, come on, I’m Nikki.
Pat: You’re not Nikki.

Does the walk anyway.

Tiffany: Yes! Do you feel that? That’s emotion.
Pat: I don’t feel anything.

Silver Linings Playbook (2012), screenplay by David O. Russell, novel by Matthew Quick

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Competition [Non-Sports], suggested by Denise Garcia.

Trivia: It took five years and 25 rewrites before David O. Russell could direct it himself as Sydney Pollack told him it was tricky to have emotional, troubling, funny and romantic content mixed together.

Dialogue On Dialogue: There is the dance competition at the end of the movie, but there is also a competition between these two — who controls each interaction until the point at which they start to ‘work’ together as a couple.


Daily Dialogue — November 7, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — November 4, 2017

“You were going to ask me for a divorce so you could be with some fucking fuckhead Brian Speer? You kidding me? Who are you? The only thing I know for sure is you’re a God damn liar.”

The Descendants (2011), screenplay by Alexander Payne and Nat Faxon & Jim Rash, novel by Kaui Hart Hemmings

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Hospital.

Trivia: The screenplay for this film was featured in the 2008 Blacklist; a list of the “most liked” unmade scripts of the year.

Dialogue On Dialogue: This is a great setup scene for a later payoff when Matt (George Clooney) says good-bye to his comatose wife.


Daily Dialogue — November 4, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — November 2, 2017

Michael: You and I are going to move my father to another room, now can you disconnect those tubes so we can move the bed out of here?
Night Nurse: That is out of the question.
Michael: You know my father? Men are coming here to kill him, now help me, please.

The Godfather (1972), screenplay by Mario Puzo and Francis Ford Coppola, novel by Puzo

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Hospital.

Trivia: According to Al Pacino, the tears in Marlon Brando’s eyes were real, in the hospital scene when Michael pledges himself to his father.

Dialogue On Dialogue: This is a pivotal sequence in the movie in which Michael’s cool, calm reaction not only saves his father’s life, but also moves Michael (Al Pacino) closer to taking over as leader of the family after his father dies.


Daily Dialogue — November 2, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Goodbye Christopher Robin Sets November 10 Release

 Goodbye Christopher Robin has a release date. Look for Goodbye Christopher Robin in November.

Simon Curtis’ A.A. Milne biopic Goodbye Christopher Robin arrives this fall

Goodbye Christopher Robin, the upcoming biopic of Winnie the Pooh creator A. A. Milne, is now set for a November 10 release through Fox Searchlight Pictures. The film stars Domhnall Gleeson as Milne and Margot Robbie as the author’s wife, Daphne.

RELATED: Marian: Margot Robbie to Headline Sony Robin Hood Film

Directed by Simon Curtis (Woman in Gold, My Week with Marilyn), Goodbye Christopher Robin offers a rare glimpse into the relationship between the beloved children’s author and his son, Christopher Robin, whose toys inspired the magical world of Winnie the Pooh. Along with his mother Daphne, and his nanny Olive, Christopher Robin and his family are swept up in the international success of the books; the enchanting tales bringing hope and comfort to England after the First World War. But with the eyes of the world on Christopher Robin, what will the cost be to the family?

Written by Frank Cottrell Boyce (Millions) and Simon Vaughan (War and Peace), Goodbye Christopher Robin is being produced by Damian Jones (Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie, The Lady in the Van) and Steve Christian (Belle).

Goodbye Christopher Robin‘s November release puts the biopic out during the start of awards season. That Friday is a busy one on for big screen releases, however. The same day sees the release of 20th Century Fox’s Red Sparrow (a spy thriller that reteams the director with The Hunger Games‘ Jennifer Lawrence), Sony Pictures Animation’s nativity tale The Star, and the Paramount Pictures comedy sequel Daddy’s Home 2.

Does Goodbye Christopher Robin sound like a film that you’re going to want to check out on the big screen? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

(Photo Credit: Dominic Chan / Judy Eddy / WENN.com)

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