‘Castle Rock’ Trailer: J.J. Abrams Dives into the World of Stephen King for Hulu

Castle Rock Trailer

“You have no idea what’s happening here, do you?”

At the tail end of New York Comic-Con this weekend, Hulu has unveiled the first Castle Rock trailer that actually features footage from the series executive produced by J.J. Abrams and set in the fictional location that has been the setting of many Stephen King stories over the decades. It doesn’t really tell us what the series will be about just yet, but it does tease plenty of Stephen King characters and Easter eggs that will be present.

Watch the Castle Rock Trailer

It’s wholly appropriate that there’s only a single line of dialogue saying, “You have no idea what’s happening here, do you?” because there’s no indication whatsoever about how various Stephen King stories will be linked together other than by the titular Main locale itself.

Instead, we get a series of mysterious images, including a funeral procession, a lethal injection, a sinking vehicle with a stikcer that says Shawshank Department of Corrections, a dog that looks exactly like Cujo, anther dog digging up a body, a piano that’s fallen through the floor of a rundown house, and more. Did you notice anything else alluding to a Stephen King story?

The new trailer teases the ensemble cast at the center of the series, with a large focus on Andre Holland (Moonlight) as attorney Henry Deaver, wandering around the various locations in the Maine town. Plus, there’s Scott Glenn as retired Sheriff Alan Pangborn, a recurring character in Stephen King’s books, and the only one who was mentioned by name during the New York Comic-Con panel (according to Deadline). But surely there will be plenty of other familiar characters making appearances.

In addition, previous stars of Stephen King adaptations are involved in the series, though they are playing completely different characters than they’ve played before, which weren’t part of any Stephen King stories before. There’s Melanie Lynskey (from the miniseries Rose Red) as Molly Strand, a real estate agent who has sold some spooky houses in Castle Rock; Sissy Spacek (star of the original Carrie) as Henry Deaver’s mother Ruth; and Bill Skarsgård (Pennywise from the recent adaptation of It) as a death row inmate who happens to be a client of Henry Deaver.

Other cast members who we get brief glimpses of include Evil Dead remake star Jane Levy as Jackie, a morbid, death-obsessed girl who’s appointed herself the historian of Castle Rock and Lost star Terry O’Quinn as Dale Lacy, who is said to be a pillar in the community.

Castle Rock was created by Sam Shaw and Dustin Thomason, who will serve as executive producers along with Abrams, Ben Stephenson and Liz Glotzer in collaboration with Bad Robot Productions and in association with Warner Bros. Television.

A psychological-horror series set in the Stephen King multiverse, Castle Rock combines the mythological scale and intimate character storytelling of King’s best-loved works, weaving an epic saga of darkness and light, played out on a few square miles of Maine woodland. The fictional Maine town of Castle Rock has figured prominently in King’s literary career: Cujo, The Dark Half, IT and Needful Things, as well as novella The Body and numerous short stories such as Rita Hayworth and The Shawshank Redemption are either set there or contain references to Castle Rock. Castle Rock is an original suspense/thriller — a first-of-its-kind reimagining that explores the themes and worlds uniting the entire King canon, while brushing up against some of his most iconic and beloved stories.

Castle Rock will arrive on Hulu sometime in 2018.

The post ‘Castle Rock’ Trailer: J.J. Abrams Dives into the World of Stephen King for Hulu appeared first on /Film.


/Film

‘Gerald’s Game’ and ‘1922’ (and ‘It’) Kickstart a Glorious Stephen King Movie Renaissance

gerald's game

It’s a hell of a year for Stephen King fans. We’ve seen not one, not two, but three supposedly unfilmable Stephen King movies released: The Dark Tower, It and Gerald’s Game. And, remarkably, only The Dark Tower has proven to have earned that unfilmable reputation.

The trick to nailing a Stephen King adaptation is to create multi-faceted, interesting characters. That is the horror author’s greatest strength. The scary stuff only works because you care about these fictional people. They feel real to you. When I read It at an admittedly way too young age, I viewed every member of The Losers Club as my friend. The recent film adaption takes many liberties, but man does it perfectly capture those characters.

And now, two new Stephen King adaptations, Gerald’s Game and 1922 (both of which were produced by Netflix) continue this trend. King, despite his reputation as a horror writer, is all about character. Welcome to the Stephen King Movie Renaissance – not even The Dark Tower can mute the success of these other adaptations.

It’s About Character, Damn It!

All the best King movies have iconic, fleshed out characters. Carrie, The Shining (yes, I’ll stand against King himself on the merits of that adaptation), The Dead Zone, Stand By Me, The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile, The Mist, Misery and Dolores Claiborne all jump to mind.

The Dark Tower failed on many levels, but the topmost reason it did not work as an adaptation is that couldn’t translate King’s richest, most well-developed characters to anything but broad caricatures on screen. Sure, the story was too weird for modern audiences, but the big secret is that even the most average movie-goer will roll with anything as long as they care about the characters up on the screen.

You can’t get any more convoluted and mythological than The Lord of the Rings, but when you give a crap about Frodo and his fellowship suddenly, you don’t blink an eye about a giant flame demon brandishing a fire whip.

gerald's game stephen king

Gerald’s Game, the Impossible Novel

Director and co-writer Mike Flanagan understood this and that’s why Gerald’s Game, a story that mostly takes place in a single location about a woman handcuffed to a bed with no one to talk to but herself, a wild dog and a creepy disfigured apparition that might or might not be a figment of her imagination, works so well.

It helps that Flanagan cast wonderful actors like Carla Gugino and Bruce Greenwood in the two biggest roles. Jessie Burlingame is a tough character. She has to be vulnerable, strong, helpless, determined, terrified and MacGuyver-smart all at the same time. Gugino expertly flips back and forth between panic attacks and a calm, realist approach to her rather unique and life-threatening situation in a way that feels so authentic that you instantly buy her as a real, complex character.

If you’re not familiar with the story, Jessie and her husband Gerald (Greenwood) go to a secluded lake house for a romantic excursion. Their relationship has grown stale and their love life is in jeopardy, so they decide to spice things up with a little minor bondage. Gerald takes things a little too far, then drops dead of a heart attack, leaving his poor wife handcuffed to the bed in a remote house with no possibility of rescue.

Flanagan and his co-writer Jeff Howard found a rather interesting way to keep a story that takes place largely inside the mind of a character that can’t really move visually interesting, which is no small feat in and of itself. Instead of the voices in Jessie’s mind being disembodied, Flanagan gives them human form. When she projects the insecurities she associates with her husband, it is Bruce Greenwood pacing around the room engaging her in conversation. When she’s having a weak moment, her strong inner voice is Jessie herself, free of the cuffs, healthy and filled with encouraged determination.

Combine that with a quick pace, a dynamic visual style and some career-best performances and suddenly this impossible-to-adapt story seems very possible. It just took a studio like Netflix to trust a smart, burgeoning genre filmmaker like Flanagan.

Gerald's Game trailer

With the characters on-point, the only thing Flanagan had to make sure worked 100% was the subtext of the movie. On the surface, Gerald’s Game mostly resembles Misery, with its protagonist stuck in bed the whole the time, but it’s much more of a companion piece to Dolores Claiborne thematically. There are obvious parallels (both stories feature eclipses and sexual assault), but on a deeper level, both stories are about how buried secrets never stay buried. These secrets and rot you from the inside and have ripple effects that change your life without you being aware of it.

In Gerald’s Game, so much about Jessie’s determination to survive is rooted in her own healing. She has to face these secrets and if she does so, she’ll find the key to her salvation. Flanagan clearly knows this. He uses subtle visual imagery to signal this deeper meaning (keep an eye on the sky in the final shot) while not forgetting to make the movie a fun time.

The film isn’t perfect. The pacing is so quick that you don’t get the same sense of impending dread and doom for Jessie that you do in the book. That means the resolution seems a little unearned and anti-climactic and there’s a coda that so neatly wraps up everything up in such a dialogue-heavy way that it all comes across as lazy compared to what came before.

Despite that stumble at the end, I still found Gerald’s Game to be incredibly involving and squirm-inducing. There was one moment in particular that I am so glad I got to experience with an audience. That’s the one downside of Netflix making everything these days: you don’t get that communal experience of seeing something scary or funny or intense with an audience. Watching my entire row try to twist out of their seats during one particularly horrifying moment and hearing the wave of vocal reactions from the packed theater made this an experience far beyond what I could have gotten at home.

But Netflix has the money and the corporate will to finance things most studios will not, so they will continue to draw in interesting filmmakers wanting to make interesting projects. Quite frankly, it’s hard to imagine Gerald’s Game getting made anywhere else in 2017.

Continue Reading Welcome to the Stephen King Movie Renaissance >>

The post ‘Gerald’s Game’ and ‘1922’ (and ‘It’) Kickstart a Glorious Stephen King Movie Renaissance appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Fantastic Fest Review: Superb Stephen King Adaptation ‘Gerald’s Game’

Gerald's Game Review

Sometimes when transferring a novel to a film, the best way to go is a straight, no-frills adaptation. The author has said all that needs to be said on the subject, and the job the filmmaker undertakes is simply bringing that source material to life through visual representation. With so many adaptations of the works of Stephen King already made – and many more just on the horizon – it’s refreshing to see a film based on his works sticking so closely to the book. Enter Gerald’s Game, based on the 1992 novel, directed by Oculus and Hush director Mike Flanagan. A streamlined adaptation, the film hits with surprising intensity and delivers ample amounts of atmosphere and scares. It also boasts a career-best performance from Carla Gugino, who aids in raising Gerald’s Game to the levels of some of the very best Stephen King adaptations. ›››

Continue reading Fantastic Fest Review: Superb Stephen King Adaptation ‘Gerald’s Game’


FirstShowing.net

Thomas Jane in Trailer for Yet Another Stephen King Adaptation ‘1922’

1922 Trailer

“A woman have to be crazy to leave a nice house like this one.” Netflix has debuted an official trailer for yet another Stephen King adaptation this year, this one titled 1922 based on one of his short stories. From director Zak Hilditch, 1922 is about a rancher who wants to kill his wife to make money, and attempts to convince his teenage son to participate. Thomas Jane stars, and the cast includes Molly Parker, Neal McDonough, Brian d’Arcy James, Dylan Schmid, and Kaitlyn Bernard. This joins the growing list of Stephen King adaptations in 2017, including The Dark Tower, It, Netflix’s Gerald’s Game, and “The Mist” TV series. This film looks like it has some style, and is as dark and twisted as everything from King’s mind. ›››

Continue reading Thomas Jane in Trailer for Yet Another Stephen King Adaptation ‘1922’


FirstShowing.net

Stephen King Talks The Dark Tower, Plus a Tour of King’s Maine

Stephen King Talks The Dark Tower, Plus a Tour of King's Maine

Stephen King talks to us about The Dark Tower

It’s been nearly 40 years since “The Gunslinger,” the first story in Stephen King’s magnum opus “The Dark Tower,” was first published. Now the saga of Roland, Jake Chambers and The Man in Black has come to life on the big screen this weekend in Sony PicturesThe Dark Tower, starring Idris Elba as Roland (the last gunslinger) and Matthew McConaughey as Walter (The Man in Black). We had the opportunity to take a tour of King’s hometown of Bangor, Maine where we saw sites that inspired (and were inspired by) King’s work, and then got to sit down and talk to the man himself. You’ll find the interview below the tour gallery!

 

ComingSoon.net: Did you ever think this would happen?

Stephen King: I never really thought about it that much. I mean, there were times when people would express an interest in it and then they’d go away again. Interest came back over time after Peter Jackson’s success with the “Lord of the Rings” movies. It never seemed like a “movie movie” idea as complex and long as it is. They’ve done a wonderful job here of telling a story that’s coherent and has all the elements of the novel “The Dark Tower.” The purists may not like it. I can’t tell about that for sure, because it doesn’t start where the books start, but at the same time, I could follow it anyway because I knew exactly what’s going on. I don’t think about that, I think about writing the next book. I’m more interested in the next thing than the last thing.

CS: Having seen the movie the other day it was kind of like the whole “Dark Tower” series thrown into a blender. Is it like being able to look at the series through fresh eyes for you?

King: Yeah. It is. And there’s so many things in the various stories, the plots are fairly complex and the characters interact and they go back and forth. I think that Akiva Goldsman, who wrote the screenplay, picked out what seemed to him to be the most accessible and human relationship kind of thing between this old guy, Roland, who’s been around for a long, long time, and the kid. And they had a wonderful chemistry when they were doing the show. And it comes through on the screen. So yeah, I mean, they had to make some decisions. Some of those decisions are related to telling a story that the general public will get, not just the the hardcore “Dark Tower” fans, the guys who show up at the fantasy conventions with Roland tattooed on their heads, something like that. So they want to get to those. You have to keep in mind that of all the books that are written, the fans of the “Dark Tower” books are the most zealous, the most fervent fans of all. But they make a small subgroup of the people who read books like “The Shining” or “Misery” or that sort of thing. So you know, they’re an acquired taste. They’re fantasy.

Roland (Idris Elba) in Columbia Pictures' THE DARK TOWER.

CS: I hate to ask you, because the film actually got negative feedback when Idris Elba was cast as Roland, what do you say to those people and what’s your response to the casting of the two primary leads?

King: Well, what I said in a tweet after all that discussion started was I didn’t care what color he was, as long as he could command the screen, draw fast and shoot straight. So it doesn’t make any difference to me, because I don’t even really see people when I’m writing because if I’m writing about a character, I’m behind their eyes, you know? Unless they walk by a mirror or something, I don’t even really see what they look like. But what really sort of made it an issue in my mind, when they cast Idris as Roland was, all of those books were illustrated to start with, those Grant novels were all illustrated. And in all those pictures, Roland is a white guy, and I never thought about that one way or another. But obviously, that became part of the mindset. But you know, it’s weird, isn’t it? Why shouldn’t he be black? Why couldn’t he be a black guy to do this? It’s like, you know what’s weirder than that? You see this show “Game of Thrones” and Westeros, they’re all British. They’re all British. I mean, Westeros is basically England, right? And nobody ever questions that. So I mean, to me, the idea that a black man would play Roland is minor compared to that.

CS: Do you hope he has a hat in the next movie?

King: It’s funny, isn’t it? Trade secret, in a lot of the pictures, not only is he white, he’s wearing a hat in most of those pictures. And I talked to the producers of the movie about that. And they said that in Western movies where the main character wears a hat don’t do well at the box office. And I said, “Really? Well, Denzel wore a hat all the way through ‘The Magnificent Seven.’ And that did pretty good at the box office.” But they don’t pay attention to that.

CS: A lot of this movie takes place on Keystone Earth, so it would be kind of silly if he was walking around New York looking like Crocodile Dundee.

King: Oh, I don’t know. I mean, have you been to New York lately? (laughs) I mean, they have a guy in Times Square that’s called the Naked Cowboy.

CS: Do you think you’ll ever go back to this world, fill in more of Roland’s backstory, write another “Dark Tower” book?

King: I’ve thought a lot about those characters in the last year or so, because they were making this movie. Actually, the last two or three years, because I had a lot of meetings with Ron Howard, who’s one of the producers and was very instrumental in bringing it to the screen. So I thought about them a lot then. I thought about them again when I did the “The Wind Through the Keyhole,” which was kind of a postscript to the books. And the funny thing about it is, I’m usually all about the next thing. And that’s why, you know, somebody was asking me at dinner, “Are you all bound up in the success or failure of this movie and the other movie?” And the answer is, no. The books are there. The books are done. And that’s sort of where my focus is. But when you do come back to them, like I don’t know. I wrote “The Gunslinger” around 1970, and years went by. I mean, it was after “Pet Sematary” that I wrote the second one, because people asked for it. And then, a couple of more years later, the third one. And then, there was a long stall out.

darktower

CS: I remember.

King: And what I’m getting back to is every time that I came back, it was like meeting old friends, you know? And I picked up the story immediately and that was great. And I felt the same way. This is a plug for a wonderful TV series called “Mr. Mercedes” that’s going to start in about a week on DIRECTV Network. And you know, I wrote that book and there was this minor character whose name was Holly Gibney, who was at a funeral and Bill Hodges was supposed to comfort her. Bill Hodges is a cop. And she just walked in and stole a book. And sometimes, that happens with characters.

CS: Your character kind of admits in the sixth book you, yourself, that you lost an outline. Is that an actual story, is that a true story?

King: Yeah.

CS: You had a long outline for this?

King: I had an outline. It wasn’t particularly long, but it outlined the entire book, you know, the entire cycle of the books. And I did lose that. The only thing I can remember about it is it was written on a typewriter in the campus newspaper office at the University of Maine. It was one of these things that was built to receive teletype as well as type. So it had all capital letters. So I remember the outline, but I don’t know where it went. I don’t even know where the first draft of that book went.

CS: We were touring around today seeing all the sites that had inspired you. What inspires you these days? Has your response to fear or the things that draw fear out of you changed over the decades?

King: I don’t think so, a little bit. I don’t think that I’m as close to the childhood monsters and things that I was close to in my 20s and 30s. It’s just a natural thing. You know, you’re closer to your childhood. You remember more of what your childhood — and then, you get this double dip because you have kids of your own and you see what they’re seeing and you’re close to them and you have them almost as research subjects, you know, kid things, you’re watching what they’re doing all the time. I don’t know. There are things that I’m interested in, but there’s no way to generalize the case exactly. I see pictures sometimes in my mind. You know, it’s like I see dead people. And sometimes I do. But then I think I would like to write a story about that, find out what it’s about. I think that in the last few years, I’ve written more about old people. I’m not sure that’s the demographic I really want to go after because they’re shrinking all the time. But you know, you write what you know. When you’re young, you write about young people.

CS: Is there anything that didn’t make it into the movie that you wish had?

King: Well, there are things I think that the hardcore fans are going to wish were in the movie. And all I can say is that if the movie’s a success, there will be a sequel. I would love to see those doors into our world. And there is some of that in this movie. I would love to see Roland on the beach with those lobster monstrosities and stuff. I understand the rationale behind the movie that’s PG-13, and I was totally signed off on that. I think it’s the right thing to do. I want as many people in the tent as possible for all kinds of reasons. Part of it, having to do with the dynamic between the gunslinger and the boy, because I think that’s a father/son relationship. I’d love to see the next picture be R because I think that’s sort of where we’re coming from now, where the movies need to go. For a long time, PG-13 was the safe spot to go. And when pictures were R, the studio executives would say, “Well, we know that this is going to make 20 percent and 30 percent less money because we’re going to exclude a market, a prime part of the movie going public.” I think that movies like “Deadpool” and “Logan” changed that to some degree.

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CS: Do you think it would be strange if they didn’t do “Drawing of the Three” in some way, shape or form next?

King: I think that would probably happen, yeah. I think that would be the logical place to go. I had to think about it in my mind. Like I said, I’m not into that part of it, the creative part.

CS: And in terms of your personal accomplishments, how high do you rank getting blocked by Trump on Twitter?

King: Not very high. Not very high. Getting blocked by Donald Trump on Twitter is a little bit like striking out the pitcher. I thought it demonstrated a sort of, I don’t know, I just think of a little kid with his little lip all the way pushed down, you know, it’s a childish thing to be done.

CS: Well, I thought it was pretty cool.

King: Not that you can’t. You know, thank you. I got a lot of good ink for that, actually. Go me.

CS: They managed to fit in your famous opening line, “The Man in Black fled across the desert and the gunslinger followed.” Were you happy with the way it’s incorporated into the film?

King: Yeah. I am. I was after them from the beginning to get that line in there. Not for me, but for the people who quoted it and stuff. It’s strange to me, but that line has become important to people, because when I wrote it it was just a line. It was a way into the story.

CS: It’s just this treasure trove in your mind. You’re so prolific and you’ve written so much. Where does that keep renewing itself from?

King: I don’t think it does. I think you get a finite number of stories, and when I was, let’s say 25 or 26, it was like people trying to escape a burning building. Inside my head, there were all these ideas that were crammed together, and I wanted to write them all at once. And now, I have less, but I’m grateful to have any, so that’s good. I’m working now, and that’s all I need. It’s a good thing. And I have a few ideas. I don’t know if they’re very good, but they’re ideas.

CS: Can you talk about what you’re working on now?

King: No. There’s a book done for next year and there’s a book that I wrote with my son called “Sleeping Beauties” that’s out next month. And he and I are going to go on tour. It’s nice to be able to write a book with your son. He told me what to do and I did it. This is a preview of the old folk’s home.

The Dark Tower is now playing in theaters everywhere.

The_Gunslinger__1988_trade_paperback_

The post Stephen King Talks The Dark Tower, Plus a Tour of King’s Maine appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

Now Stream This: The Late and Great Sam Shepard, Some Stephen King, and One of the Creepiest Movies Ever

now stream this sam shepard

(Welcome to Now Stream This, a column dedicated to the best movies streaming on Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and every other streaming service out there.)

Crank the air conditioner – August is upon us, bringing with it the dog days of summer and the realization that the winter is more terrifyingly close than ever. But there’s still plenty of time left to stream movies. In fact, you have your entire life to do that, so why not get started now? If you’re unsure of just what to watch, never fear – Now Stream This is here.

In this edition, we have a recent film with a stellar performance from the late, great Sam Shepard; one of the most genuinely creepy ghost movies ever made; an ambitious, often misunderstood sci-fi epic; a Stephen King adaptation; one of the strangest sequels in Hollywood history, and much more! So dab some sunscreen on your nose and pull the recliner up nice and close to the TV. Let’s get streaming.

1. Cold In July
Now Streaming on Netflix

Actor and playwright Sam Shepard died earlier this week. Shepard’s death is a great loss to film and theatre, but at least he leaves behind a wealth of work to cherish. There’s plenty to pick from to highlight Shepard’s talent, but one of the best recent examples is Jim Mickle’s 2014 thriller Cold In July. Adapted from a story by Joe R. Lansdale and throwing off some serious John Carpenter vibes, Cold In July features Michael C. Hall as a man who kills a home intruder, only to be drawn into a much bigger and far more sinister plot with the dead intruder’s father, played masterfully by Shepard. Don Johnson also shows up, and nearly steals the whole film, but this is a perfect showcase for Shepard’s talents.

For fans of: Hap and LeonardChristine, Blue Ruin, mullets.

2. The Friends of Eddie Coyle
Now Streaming on FilmStruck

If you like your crime dramas bleak and grainy, don’t miss Peter Yates’ marvelous, depressing The Friends of Eddie Coyle. Robert Mitchum gives a career-best performance as weary, aging bakery truck driver Eddie Coyle. To make ends meet, Coyle runs guns on the side – a smooth operation that goes south very quickly. One of those ’70s flicks where the film grain is essentially a character itself, The Friends of Eddie Coyle is melancholy and memorable, just don’t sit down to watch it expecting a feel-good experience.

For fans of: The Taking of Pelham One Two ThreeThe Town, existential woe.

3. Lake Mungo
Now Streaming on Shudder

This criminally underseen 2010 Australian chiller from Joel Anderson is the rarest of the rare: a modern horror movie that’s actually scary. And I’m not talking about cheap jump scares here. No, Lake Mungo is a ghost story that creeps under your skin and chills your blood, having you nervously looking around once it’s over. A found-footage style story of a family coming to terms with the sudden death of a loved one who may or may not have entirely departed. This is the perfect horror film to watch in your living room with the lights turned down. Just don’t be surprised when you’re quickly turning them back on once the credits are rolling (oh, and by the way, keep watching all the way through the credits for even more creepiness).

For fans of: Session 9, Paranormal ActivityThe Others, getting the creeps.

4. Laura
Now Streaming on FilmStruck

Otto Preminger’s brilliant film noir sets up a seemingly straightforward mystery: who killed successful advertising executive Laura Hunt (Gene Tierney)? But nothing is straightforward in Laura, and the film travels down dark alleys you wouldn’t have suspected as the cop investigating the case (Dana Andrews) finds himself smitten with the dead dame. Somehow simultaneously breezy and disturbing, Laura is one of the best movies Hollywood ever produced, so you should probably get around to watching it if it’s somehow escaped you all this time.

For fans of: Anatomy of a Murder, The Big SleepTouch of Evil, Vincent Price without a mustache.

5. Cloud Atlas
Now Streaming on Netflix

Even if you don’t entirely like Cloud Atlas, you have to appreciate it for the ambitious, wild film experience that it is. The Wachowskis and Tom Tykwer adapted David Mitchell’s novel into a sprawling 171 minute extravaganza. Multiple plots stretch out across six different time periods, from the past into the distant future, with a cast that includes Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, Hugo Weaving, Jim Sturgess, Ben Whishaw, Hugh Grant and many, many more, all playing multiple characters. It’s almost impossible to summarize this movie – you just need to see it to believe it.

For fans of: The FountainThe MatrixThe Hours, Tom Hanks using an incredibly unconvincing Irish accent.

Continue Reading The Best Movies Streaming Right Now >>

The post Now Stream This: The Late and Great Sam Shepard, Some Stephen King, and One of the Creepiest Movies Ever appeared first on /Film.


/Film

‘Guardians of the Galaxy 2’ Holds at #1 While ‘King Arthur’ Falls on His Sword

UPDATE: Fox has finally sent over debut international results for Alien: Covenant, which released in 34 international markets this weekend with an estimated $ 42 million. The film was #1 in 19 of its opening markets including South Korea ($ 7.2m), UK ($ 6.4m), France ($ 4.5m), Australia ($ 3.1m), Spain ($ 1.9m) and Hong Kong ($ 1.8m). Next weekend, along with its domestic debut in 3,600+ theaters, the film will open in 52 markets including Germany, Russia and Sweden. Here’s a look at the top p…
Box Office Mojo – Top Stories

/Filmcast Ep. 418 – King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

King Arthur Legend of the Sword trailer

DavidDevindra and Jeff re-affirm that Doug Liman’s still got “it,” debate the merits of naming your child Kylo, and praise the new season of Master of None. Be sure to read how Matt Zoller Seitz inspired this week’s Leftovers.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Also, like us on Facebook!

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SHOWNOTES

What We’ve Been Watching (3:30)
  • David: The Wall
  • Devindra: Master of None, I Love Dick
  • Jeff: Castrophe S3, The Detour
 Film News (18:00)
Featured Review (50:00)
  • King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
  • (1:07:30) SPOILERS
After Dark (1:16:15)

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The post /Filmcast Ep. 418 – King Arthur: Legend of the Sword appeared first on /Film.


/Film

‘The Lion King’ Casts Billy Eichner and Seth Rogen as Timon and Pumbaa

The Lion King Remake Cast - Seth Rogen and Billy Eichner as Timon and Pumbaa

Today, Walt Disney Pictures set release dates for a bunch of their movies coming to theaters over the next couple years, and that included their live-action remake of the modern animated classic The Lion King. Director Jon Favreau is tackling the project after remaking The Jungle Book for Disney last year with Donald Glover taking on the role of Simba and James Earl Jones reprising the role of his father Mufasa, with Beyonce being eyed to play Nala. Now two of the most important characters in the movie have been cast as well.

Undoubtedly the most entertaining characters in The Lion King are the meerkat and warthog duo known as Timon and Pumbaa. The characters were voiced by Nathan Lane and Ernie Sabella respectively in the 1994 animated musical, but in the live-action remake, they’ll be voiced by Billy on the Street host Billy Eichner and blockbuster comedy star Seth Rogen.

Find out more about The Lion King remake cast below.

The casting of Timon and Pumbaa (reported by The Wrap) is arguably more important than that of Simba. The two characters were easily the most memorable from The Lion King, and they’re also responsible for the most popular and infectious musical number, “Hakuna Matata.” The song is an upbeat, lively and fun tune that means “no worries” when translated from Swahili to English. If you’ve somehow forgotten how that goes or you’ve been living under a rock, here it is:

There has been no confirmation as to whether or not this remake of The Lion King will be a straight-up musical like the animated original, but since the Beauty and the Beast remake went that route, it’s not out of the realm of possibility, especially with musical talents like Donald Glover (who raps as Childish Gambino) and Beyonce taking the two lion leads. Then again, the remake of Cinderella wasn’t a musical, and The Jungle Book only utilized two songs from the original movie. Still, remaking The Lion King and excluding “Hakuna Matata” would be a mistake, even if it’s one of only a few songs in the movie.

We know that Billy Eichner can carry a tune pretty well, even if it’s not as good as Nathan Lane, but Seth Rogen doesn’t have the same caliber of voice as Ernie Sabella. That could be an indication as to whether this is actually a musical, but it wouldn’t be hard to touch up Rogen’s voice or make his contributions to the song less of a vocal stretch. More importantly, they both have the right persona and presence to nail each character. I can just hear Timon’s lines coming from Billy Eichner already, and it brings a smile to my face.

Now the next question is, who will Jon Favreau get to play Scar? Christoph Waltz seems like the most obvious choice, but that’s almost too easy. Maybe Mads Mikkelsen is up for the task?

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