‘Fargo’ and ‘Legion’ Showrunner Noah Hawley Developing ‘Doctor Doom’ Movie

doctor doom movie

Noah Hawley, the Emmy Award-winning showrunner of Fargo dropped a bomb at the end of his Legion panel in Ballroom 20 at San Diego Comic-Con International: “I’m developing a film for Fox, and I’ll just say two words. Doctor. Doom.” Read on for more info on Hawley’s Doctor Doom movie.

The announcement of a Doctor Doom movie by Noah Hawley certainly comes as a surprise to fans. The character, who is part of Marvel’s Fantastic Four family, recently appeared in Josh Trank’s failed 2015 film Fantastic Four, portrayed by Toby Kebbell.

Created by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, Doctor Victor Von Doom first appeared in Fantastic Four #5, published on July 1962. Doom is both a genius inventor and a sorcerer, wearing a trademark metal mask and green cloak. He is often listed as one of the greatest comic book villains of all time and is Stan Lee’s favorite bad guy. Doom has appeared in previous movies such as Roger Corman’s unreleased 1994 The Fantastic Four played by Joseph Culp, and the 2005 film Fantastic Four and its 2007 sequel Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer played by Julian McMahon.

After the 2015 reboot of the Fantastic Four failed to excite audiences and critics, Fox was said to be going back to the drawing board to reboot the team yet again, but this time more geared towards younger audiences. Seth Grahame-Smith reportedly penned a script for the Fantastic Four reboot, but we knew nothing more about the developing project. It’s unclear if this is the same project or something else, but I don’t expect a creator like Noah Hawley to be involved in any kind of kid-centric take.

As for what a Doctor Doom movie would be about…I’m not sure. The character has primarily been a villain of the Fantastic Four. Stan Lee has been quoted as saying that “it’s unfair that [Doom is] considered a villain” because “he just wants to rule the world and maybe he could do a better job of it.” I doubt that Fox will approach the baddie from the Despicable Me Gru angle.

There is also the possibility that Hawley is not making a Doctor Doom movie, but a Fantastic Four reboot. Remember, he only teased that he was developing a film project that had to do with Doctor Doom, not that he was developing a Doctor Doom-focused feature film. There is also the possibility that Fox is trying to fill a quota to retain the film rights to Marvel’s Fantastic Four universe, and doing another Fantastic Four branded film is probably a strikeout before going to bat.

I’ve been extremely impressed by everything that Noah Hawley has produced thus far, and I’m on board to see any project he’s involved with. A bad guy focused Marvel movie is also very appealing. However, it’s being produced by 20th Century Fox, who retain the movie rights to the Fantastic Four universe of characters. Besides, Marvel Studios is too her- based to even consider a villain focused film (I say, less than a year before before Infinity War hits theaters).

The post ‘Fargo’ and ‘Legion’ Showrunner Noah Hawley Developing ‘Doctor Doom’ Movie appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Interview (Written): Noah Hawley

A Q&A with the executive producer of the TV series ‘Fargo’.

A THR interview with Noah Hawley who for three seasons has exec produced and been the showrunner of the FX series ‘Fargo’. His other TV credits include ‘Bones’, ‘The Unusuals’, and ‘Legion’.

The first two seasons started with these actions of shockingly serious violence that felt very unplanned and spontaneous. But the big act of instigating violence here is both precise and almost kind of Looney Tunes-y in its humor. Does that sound right to you, and is that part of the tone of the season in your mind?

The Looney Tunes tone? No. I knew from that first year that because we’re making a 10-hour movie and not a two-hour that if we did the actual tone of Fargo — which is a more comic movie than people remember — then people might think we got the tone wrong. I said to myself, “If you look at the whole array, tonally from Ladykillers or Raising Arizona on the one side to Miller’s Crossing to the other side, I think we have to lop off each end.” We shouldn’t ever devolve into farce, but I also don’t think we want to be earnest at any real point. What I ended up settling on is this idea of making No Country for Old Fargo, where we need a dramatic crime infrastructure that sustains the level of threat throughout, where you’re always a little worried about everybody and the threat of violence is always there. And within that, you can have these comic moments.

This year, there is whimsy to the setup and Ray and Nikki have a certain lightness to them that makes us really like them. And obviously, what happens at the end of that first hour between them is both horrific and entertaining. So it’s a balance, but you’ll find overall that there is a lot of comedy this year but the stakes are really high as well.

In terms of storytelling and experiencing the way that a TV story can be told, how did the Legion experience bleed into Fargo?

I deliberately kept it out. When I was behind the camera shooting the first hour of this year’s Fargo, there were a couple of moments where I thought, “Oh, the camera can do this,” and then I thought “No, that’s not a Coen brothers move.” The great thing about Fargo is that it’s a more objective style of filmmaking, the camera moves in very classical ways and the most interesting things normally are the characters. And that said, I started in season two to enhance some moments with a more obvious camera move, but in general, it was nice to go back to that language, the cinematic language of just trusting your story and using the camera to tell the story but not drawing attention to it.

So even after two, into three seasons now, the What Would the Coen Brothers Do? bracelet is still something you look at? It’s not something where it’s become your Fargo at this point in your mind? Or at least not completely?

Every year there is a little bit of a relaxation, I would imagine. For two years, I never allowed us to pull focus between characters in the sequence. I always thought, “Well, we’ll do two passes and we’ll have the focus deep on one and focus near on another and we’ll find a way to cut around that.” But this year because so much of this show is about pairs of people, it was just natural. I mean, the story was in the focus shift, the story was when Emmit and Sy are facing off against [David Thewlis’] Varga, and Varga is saying, “It’s an investment, not a loan.” And Emmit looks over at Sy, the story is what happens on Sy’s face. You want the camera, the focus to shift. So, I relaxed that. We still shouldn’t do it melodramatically or anything. But yeah, I’m always trying to think about. It has to be consistent with the filmmaking of No Country for Old Men or the filmmaking of Fargo or A Serious Man. This isn’t about pyrotechnics of the camera, it’s about telling a story.

For the rest of the interview, go here.


Interview (Written): Noah Hawley was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium