How to Get the ‘Film Look’ Regardless of What Camera You Use

Whether you’re shooting on an ARRI Alexa or a Canon T3i, you can achieve the “film look” by putting these cinematic techniques to work.

We’re all going for the film look, but if you aren’t capturing their images on a powerful cinema camera like the ARRI Alexa or RED Weapon, you might think that this is a level of quality you’ll never be able to achieve. That’s simply not true. Though cameras do play a role in making an image look “cinematic,” there are so many other factors that play an even bigger one, and Jonny Von Wallström of Creative North talks about some of them in the video below.

When it comes to creating a cinematic image, there are several important elements that will dictate (more than your camera will) the look of your images: color, composition, camera movement, and lighting.

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No Film School

2017 Austin Film Festival: Scott Frank

A 3-part series of reflections on observations made by top Hollywood writer.

One of the panels I attended at the recent Austin Film Festival featured Scott Frank. Moderated by Craig Mazin, Frank — whose screenwriting credits include Dead Again, Little Man Tate, Malice, Out of Sight, Minority Report, Marley & Me, and Logan — delved deep into his creative and writing process. I thumbed my way through copious notes on my iPhone notes app. Over the past few days, I’ve done a series of reflections based on comments made by Frank during the talk.

Scott Frank

Part 1: “The first paragraph of a screenplay can tell you if they can write.
The first five pages can tell you if they have a voice.”

Part 2: “It has to come from character. I’m always going back to the people.”

Part 3: “You can’t be a writer if you’re not a reader.”

Twitter: @scottfrank.


2017 Austin Film Festival: Scott Frank was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Dear Filmmakers, Study More than Film

So, you eat, sleep, and breath cinema, huh?

Okay, so you’re an expert on Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese, Andrei Tarkovsky, and Steven Spielberg. You like Ozu and Kurosawa, know the dance from Bande à part, and can spell Eadweard Muybridge without googling it. You, my friend, know your shit about cinema. But still, despite the hundreds of film books and screenplays you’ve read and thousands of films you’ve seen, there may be so much more information you’re failing to feed your brain. Andrew Saladino of The Royal Ocean Film Society suggests that while having an encyclopedic knowledge of and insatiable interest in cinema is great, expanding your education beyond it might actually be the best thing you could do as a filmmaker.

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No Film School

John Cusack in Trailer for Artificial Intelligence Sci-Fi Film ‘Singularity’

Singularity Movie Trailer

“I am a survivor. But I am not alone.” Voltage Pictures has released an official trailer for a super weird, out-of-nowhere sci-fi film called Singularity, in reference to the theoretical “singularity” moment within computing / technology. John Cusack stars as the CEO of a company that is about to released a “super computer designed to end all wars.” Surprise! The computer determines humans must be eradicated, and unleashes an army of robots upon the world. This is less like Transcendence, much more of a Terminator rip-off meets Transformers meets Divergent, or something like that. The cast includes Julian Schaffner, Jeannine Wacker, Eileen Grubba, and Carmen Argenziano. It can also be filed under why-is-John-Cusack-making-such-terrible-movies, since it looks as bad as they come. This is one trailer worth skipping. ›››

Continue reading John Cusack in Trailer for Artificial Intelligence Sci-Fi Film ‘Singularity’


FirstShowing.net

2017 Austin Film Festival: Scott Frank (Part 3)

Reflections on observations by Out of Sight and Minority Report screenwriter.

One of the panels I attended at the recent Austin Film Festival featured Scott Frank. Moderated by Craig Mazin, Frank — whose screenwriting credits include Dead Again, Little Man Tate, Malice, Out of Sight, Minority Report, Marley & Me, and Logan — delved deep into his creative and writing process. I thumbed my way through copious notes on my iPhone notes app. Over the past few days, I’ve done a series of reflections based on comments made by Frank during the talk.

Scott Frank

Today:

You can’t be a writer if you’re not a reader.
You’re using words in your script and reading books feeds that.
I read everything. Always learning how writers write.

It’s simple: Writers read.

Why?

It’s about words.

As Scott says, we use words in our writing. Reading exposes us to new ways to use words. As Rumer Godden wrote:

“A writer who has never explored words, who has never searched, seeded, sieved, sifted through his knowledge and memory… dictionaries, thesaurus, poems, favorite paragraphs, to find the right word, is like someone owning a gold mine who has never mined it.”

It’s about writing.

When we read, we take in how a writer writes. Whether conscious or unconscious, that can influence how we write.

It’s about the soul.

Creative expression is an outer exhibition of energy. Stories feed the soul and refuel our creativity.

Watch movies. Watch TV. But don’t forget: Read.

Words of wisdom from Scott Frank.

On November, his new series ‘Godless’ debuts on Netflix.

Jeff Daniels in ‘Godless’.

‘Godless’ website here.

Twitter: @scottfrank.


2017 Austin Film Festival: Scott Frank (Part 3) was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

2017 Austin Film Festival: Scott Frank (Part 2)

Reflections on observations by Out of Sight and Minority Report screenwriter.

One of the panels I attended at the Austin Film Festival featured Scott Frank. Moderated by Craig Mazin, Frank — whose screenwriting credits include Dead Again, Little Man Tate, Malice, Out of Sight, Minority Report, Marley & Me, and Logan — delved deep into his creative and writing process. I thumbed my way through copious notes on my iPhone notes app. Over the next several days, I’ll do a series of reflections based on comments made by Frank during the talk.

Scott Frank

Today:

It has to come from character. I’m always going back to the people.

Why character?
It’s about what makes a person a person.
What do they want?
What do they fear?

It’s the low grade fever of what your characters are about.

What is it that speaks to me?
Is this a character I like?

These are my hastily typed takes on what Scott was saying, so perhaps more paraphrased than actual quotes. However, during his talk, it was abundantly clear how critically important Scott believes working with characters is to crafting a story. Indeed, the references above are scattered throughout his comments as he kept returning to the subject again and again.

Those of you who have followed my blog for any time know that I promote character based screenwriting. My mantra:

“Start with character. End with character. Find the story in-between.”

Based on what I heard in Scott’s comments, I feel safe in saying I think he aligns with this perspective.

So what’s the big deal of working with characters?

Characters are Plot.

Their wants, needs, fears, personal histories, backstories, and destinies — especially the Protagonist — emerge as the backbone of the story’s structure.

Characters are Theme.

Whatever thematic point of a story is, it’s invariably tied to the emotional and psychological journey of the Protagonist and other key characters.

Characters are Dialogue.

Scott hit on this point a few times in his talk. For example, he said, “If I can write dialogue, I can hear the characters, and I know I can continue process.” His comment reminded me of the response the great playwright August Wilson gave when asked how he wrote such great dialogue: “I don’t. They do.” The ‘they’ in question were his characters.

In sum, characters are STORY. Everything you need to know is right there inhabited within and by your characters.

It has to come from character. I’m always going back to the people.

Great advice. Always lean into your characters. Always go back to the people who exist within your story universe.

More tomorrow from the 2017 Austin Film Festival panel featuring Scott Frank.

Here is a teaser for Scott’s Netflix series ‘Godless’ which he wrote and directed. The series debuts this on November 22.

‘Godless’ website here.

Twitter: @scottfrank.


2017 Austin Film Festival: Scott Frank (Part 2) was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

2017 Austin Film Festival: Scott Frank (Part 1)

Reflections on observations by Out of Sight and Minority Report screenwriter.

One of the panels I attended at the Austin Film Festival featured Scott Frank. Moderated by Craig Mazin, Frank — whose screenwriting credits include Dead Again, Little Man Tate, Malice, Out of Sight, Minority Report, Marley & Me, and Logan — delved deep into his creative and writing process. I thumbed my way through copious notes on my iPhone notes app. Over the next several days, I’ll do a series of reflections based on comments made by Frank during the talk.

Scott Frank

Today:

The first paragraph of a screenplay can tell you if they can write.
The first five pages can tell you if they have a voice.

Both of these are critical. And as Scott notes, both need to be apparent at the earliest stages of a script’s pages.

How can you tell if a writer can write from the first paragraph of a script?

They have a solid grasp of and love for the English language.
They know how to immediately set the tone and atmosphere of the piece.
They are smart enough to write something which is entertaining.
They are clever enough to exploit a narrative element which hooks the reader.
They embrace visual writing.
They engage the reader’s emotional life.

Bottom line, as per Scott Frank, they establish right up front that they are in control. They know the craft, they know this story universe, and they know how they want to tell the story.

All that in a first paragraph.

How can you tell if a writer has a voice from the first five script pages?

They create a consistent tone throughout the script’s opening.
They convey personality through both dialogue and scene description.
They match style to genre as an active reflection of the story’s feel.
They exhibit something distinctive in the interplay of moments and scenes.
They make a reader feel there is a real character telling the story.

From their words on the page, the writer exhibits a unique narrative voice, specific to this story, this writer, these pages.

All that in a script’s first five pages.

It’s a lot to ask. It also speaks to how important it is to accomplish both goals straightaway in a script. It not only can grab a reader’s attention and propel them into the story, it also creates a kind of mental lens through which one interprets and experiences the entire rest of the story.

When you know the writer can write… has a firm control of the story… has a distinctive voice… and that’s all established from the first paragraph through the first five pages…

That sets us up to look forward to the rest of the script with anticipation and hope that these pages we’re going through…

It’s a good read.

More tomorrow from the 2017 Austin Film Festival panel featuring Scott Frank.

Here is the trailer for Scott’s Netflix series ‘Godless’ which he wrote and directed. The series debuts this month.

Those of us in attendance at Scott’s Austin Film Festival panel got a sneak preview of a second ‘Godless’ trailer. The series looks great, really looking forward to watching it!

‘Godless’ website here.


2017 Austin Film Festival: Scott Frank (Part 1) was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Watch: Powerful Polish Short Film ‘Everything Will Be Nice’ Set in NYC

Everything Will Be Nice Short Film

“Where is that money, Piotrek?” We’re proud to exclusively debut an award-winning short film online, titled Everything Will Be Nice, or Wszystko Bedzie Fajnie in Polish. This short, directed by and starring Polish actor/filmmaker Jan Kutrzeba, touches on immigration, love, trust, poverty, and loneliness. It was made out of love by a handful of immigrant filmmakers and two talented Polish actors living in New York. Kutrzeba “wanted to share the story of what it’s truly like for immigrants trying to make it to the next day in the city, surviving solely on the love the characters share with each other.” It was shot and it’s presented as one long, single-take involving a Polish couple arguing at the morning in their apartment in the city. This is an impressive short, that played at a number of film festivals last year. It’s worth taking a moment to watch. ›››

Continue reading Watch: Powerful Polish Short Film ‘Everything Will Be Nice’ Set in NYC


FirstShowing.net

Raindance 2017 films nominated for British Independent Film Awards

Congratulations to feature films In Another Life, Isolani, and short film Work for receiving British Independent Film Awards nominations! All three films were screened at the 25th Raindance Film Festival, and we are excited to see them continue their journey and garner recognition.

 

In Another Life

Nominated for the Discovery Award at the British Independent Film Awards.

In Another Life, from debut director Jason Wingard, follows the harrowing journey of a Syrian refugee struggling to reunite with his wife.

After being forced to flee war-torn Syria, Adnan and his wife Bana are separated on route through France. Adnan faces the crippling challenge of living in ‘The Jungle’. His only option is to risk his life in a series of desperate attempts to cross the channel, hoping he will be reunited with his wife. Set against the backdrop of the refugee camp known as ‘The Jungle’ in Calais the film combines documentary footage and real-life interviews with a dramatic narrative to give a voice to refugees that are seldom heard.

In Another Life had its World Premiere at Raindance Film Festival 2017, where it won the Best UK Feature award.

Isolani

Nominated for the Discovery Award at the British Independent Film Awards.

From writer/director R. Paul Wilson, Scottish thriller Isolani is the story of a mother fighting to protect her son after witnessing a murder.

After she witnesses a brutal murder, a young single mother becomes a pawn in a deadly game of deception. To protect her son and start a new life, she must outwit an ambitious prosecutor, a corrupt detective and a desperate killer. Fantastic acting, clever lighting and cinematography help maintain a creeping tension from beginning to end in this edge-of-seat film.

Isolani had its World Premiere at Raindance Film Festival 2017, where it was nominated for Best UK Feature.

 

Work

Nominated for the Best British Short Film award at the British Independent Film Awards.

A teenager’s perspective of the world around her begins to shift as she is confronted with its capacity for injustice.

Work was nominated for Best UK Short at Raindance Film Festival 2017.

Work

The winners will be announced at the British Independent Film Awards ceremony on Sunday 10 December.

Click here to see the full list of BIFA 2017 nominees

The post Raindance 2017 films nominated for British Independent Film Awards appeared first on Raindance.

Raindance

Tom Hanks Sci-Fi Film Bios Picked Up by Amblin Entertainment

Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment has picked up the Tom Hanks sci-fi film Bios

Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment has picked up the Tom Hanks sci-fi film Bios

Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment has picked up the upcoming sci-fi film Bios starring Academy Award-winner Tom Hanks and directed by Game of Thrones’ Miguel Sapochnik, according to THR. The story comes from a spec script written by newcomer Craig Luck and producer Ivor Powell (Blade RunnerAlien).

RELATED: Tom Hanks to lead sci-fi film Bios

Bios is the story of Finch (Hanks) the last man on Earth, who is dying. “As he faces his own mortality, he builds a robot to care for his dog, the only thing he truly loves. Finch must teach the robot to become “human” enough to take care for his dog, and also must convince his dog to accept the robot as his caretaker and friend.”

Several studios, including Legendary, Warner Bros. and Studio 8, were in negotiations to to try to make the film, which plans an early 2019 shooting date.

Spielberg told the site, “Bios is an original, emotionally stirring tale that at its core is very much an Amblin movie. I can think of no one more perfect to embody this story about the meaning of being human than Tom Hanks.”

Tom Hanks will next be seen in Steven Spielberg’s December Oscar contender The Post, and will also pen the screenplay for and star in the World War II Navy drama Greyhound. Sapochnik won a directing Emmy for the Game of Thrones episode “Battle of the Bastards.”

What do you guys think of Amblin Entertainment taking on the Tom Hanks film Bios? Are you excited for the film? Which new Tom Hanks film are you most interested in? We want to hear from you. Let us know your thoughts in the comments below or tweet us @ComingSoonnet.

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)

The post Tom Hanks Sci-Fi Film Bios Picked Up by Amblin Entertainment appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

ComingSoon.net

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