Watch: The 180-Degree Rule Explained in Less than 2 Minutes

This is one of the first and most important fundamentals you learn in film school. Why not learn it from this 2-minute video, tuition free?

If your professor isn’t too tired/frazzled/hungover to just toss a syllabus on your desk and call it good, your first day of film school is most likely going to include a lesson on the 180-degree rule. This filmmaking fundamental is key in keeping the spacial continuity of your film clear and concise, which will in turn keep your audience from being confused about what’s happening on-screen. In this short video from Fandor, you get to learn all the basics of the 180-degree rule, how to follow it, and how to break it for dramatic effect.

The thing about the 180-degree rule is that it’s pretty simple in theory: draw an imaginary line down the center of the action and then only shoot from one side. Bam! Easy! However, in practice it’s a little more difficult than that, because it’s easy for things to get confusing once all of the cameras, tripods, lights, actors, and crew members are buzzing around on set.

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‘Batman and Bill’ Trailer: The Truth About the Creation of Batman Explained in a New Documentary

Batman and Bill Trailer

Everyone thinks Bob Kane is the sole creator of Batman. What the new documentary Batman and Bill presupposes is, maybe he’s not.

Even though Bob Kane is frequently and historically associated with the creation of Batman, the more educated comic book fans now know that many of the signature elements of Batman’s long comic book history were created by another man named Bill Finger. But why is his name not nearly as synonymous with the creation of The Dark Knight? A new documentary explores why Finger was omitted from Batman’s history and only just recently started getting the credit that he’s due.

Watch the Batman and Bill trailer below.

As the trailer explains, though Bob Kane had the initial idea to create a superhero who was quite the opposite of DC Comics’ Big Blue Boy Scout known as Superman, all of the signature traits of Batman’s comic book adventures came from Bill Finger. Not only did Finger create Batman’s trademark design and draw his stories, he was responsible for creating some key pieces of The Caped Crusader’s mythology. Robin, The Joker, The Penguin, The Riddler, Scarecrow, Commissioner Gordon, Gotham City and much more were all added into Batman’s universe by Bill Finger.

Thankfully, since 2015, Bill Finger has started receiving prominent credit for his pivotal contributions to the creation of Batman, even appearing in the credits for Gotham and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, and presumably anything associated with Batman from here on out.

But how does a man who is so integral to the creation of one of the most revered superheroes of all time get shoved to the side and almost forgotten by comic book history? That’s the story that Batman and Bill is setting out to tell, inspired by author Marc Tyler Nobleman‘s endeavor to make sure Bill Finger got credit for his work, which he chronicled in the book Bill The Boy Wonder: The Secret Co-Creator of Batman.

In addition to Nobleman, plenty of comic book historians, artists, Batman experts (like comic writer and filmmaker Kevin Smith) and more appear in the documentary to talk about this tragic tale of ignorance in the creation of Batman that went on for far too long.

Everyone thinks that Bob Kane created Batman, but that’s not the whole truth. One author makes it his crusade to seek justice for Bill Finger, a struggling writer who was the key figure in creating the iconic superhero, from concept to costume to the very character we all know and love. Bruce Wayne may be Batman’s secret identity, but his creator was always a true mystery.

Batman and Bill will be available to watch on Hulu on May 6.

The post ‘Batman and Bill’ Trailer: The Truth About the Creation of Batman Explained in a New Documentary appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Video: 15 Beats of a Classic Story Structure Explained

How do Hollywood screenwriters structure a screenplay?

There’s no such thing as «the right way» to write a script, but there are certainly well-trodden paths that countless professional screenwriters take to craft certain story structures. And though these structures might seem overused or formulaic, they do provide a great framework for new writers to cut their teeth on. In this video from The Film Look, we get to take a look at Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth, or The Hero’s Journey, which is one of the most common story templates, to not only learn what it is and how it works, but to also see how it unfolds in other films as well.

Maybe the best way to start talking about this is by explaining exactly what a «beat» is. Well, a beat is the smallest unit of measurement in a screenplay represented by an event, major decision, or important piece of new information. A beat sheet, or as they call it in the video, a «beat list,» is a breakdown of every important moment that occurs in your screenplay in the order in which they occur.

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Watch: Ingenious Camera Movement, Explained in One Superb Video Essay

This detailed video essay analyzes brilliant instances of camera movement.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a camera movement is worth three thousand. In fact, so much information and emotion can be communicated through camera movement that many top directors prefer to let their cameras, rather than their characters, speak the film’s most important lines.

As all great directors and cinematographers know, the camera has agency. It can whisper, yell, stalk, cope, abandon, and decide to hide information or to reveal it. It can even wander through scenes, becoming a character unto itself.

A new video essay by CineFix breaks down dozens of brilliant uses of camera movement in contemporary and classic cinema, revealing their motivations and intended effects. From Star Trek to Soy Cuba to Reservoir Dogs, CineFix shows that, when the invisible artifice of the moving camera is suddenly unveiled, important information can be embedded within the movement.

Below, we break down Cinefix’s five examples of camera movement types.

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