Watch: The Quickest and Easiest Way to Edit Clips to Music (Seriously)

This technique will basically let you do an hours-long job in mere minutes.

Editing is a long, drawn-out process that takes days, weeks, and even months to do, and yeah, there are many different ways to shave off your work time by making your workflow more efficient, but for the most part, you’re in it for the long haul. That is unless you’re wanting to edit clips to music. Usually, the process of matching up your clips to the beat would take hours, requiring you to zoom in close to your audio waveform, pinpoint each peak, and then snap every clip to those exact places on your timeline. This was painfully tedious, but in this video, Peter McKinnon shows you a freakishly fast way to edit your footage to music in Adobe Premiere Pro.

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Become a Workflow Master, Part 1: Before the Edit

Mastering post-production workflow can be a lifesaver for any project.

Becoming a post-production workflow master may not sound super exciting, but the time, energy, and frustration that you can save by mastering your own workflow will lead a more successful, less stressful, and more efficient post-production experience.

When I launched my video production company, it was a solo operation so my workflow didn’t need to be super clean. Today, Fractal Visuals has grown into a phenomenal and talented team of over 15 cinematographers, editors, and support crew. Creating a universal, ultra-clean, and unwavering workflow was a critical part of this growth. For any production company, a carefully crafted workflow ensures maximum productivity, no failures of communication, rapid turnaround times, and quality organization for archiving.

A carefully crafted workflow ensures maximum productivity.

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How to Edit a Film Score to Best Serve Your Story

Sound design is extremely challenging, but these tips should help put you on the right track.

In most cases, indie filmmakers don’t have the budget to hire someone to score their films. This means that you miss out on the benefit of having a score specifically designed to match what’s going on up on screen, so you will have to figure out a way to do it with a piece of music that already exists. Though this is challenging, Kris Truini gives you a few helpful tips on how to pull it off, even if you don’t have much experience working with music, scores, and soundtracks.

Truini shares a bunch of great tips in the video, but perhaps the most important one is this: the score/soundtrack should serve your story, not the other way around. In other words, the pacing of the edits in a scene should be more important than that of the music.

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Watch: How Three-Point Editing Can Help You Edit Faster

This editing technique is simple and might be the fastest way to do post-production work.

Every editor wants to work faster and more efficiently, which is why we’re always on the hunt for techniques professionals use to speed up their own workflows. In this video from tutvid, Nathaniel Dodson shows you a super simple method called “three-point editing” that will save you a ton of time when you begin working on a rough cut in your timeline. Check it out below:

The basic idea around three-point editing is that your clips will be roughly edited down before you ever drag them over to your timeline, which saves you time, energy, and sanity when you eventually start working on your rough cut.

Essentially what you do is for every edit you will use three points of in and out placement: in-points and out-points on your clip and an in-point on your timeline. What this does is it allows you to select the portions of a clip that you want to use, decide where on the timeline your want that portion to go, and then your NLE will automatically place it there once the edit is made.

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Watch: How to Use Waveforms to Quickly Edit Dialogue

There is an easier way to edit dialogue to make it a less labor-intensive and time-consuming task.

If you’ve ever had to edit a ton of footage with dialogue, you know that it can take forever to find your in and out points. You could scrub through your timeline to hear when each line begins and ends, which, again, can eat up time that you simply do not have, or you can take a much easier route by using the waveform in your NLE. In this video, Caleb Pike of DSLR Video Shooter shows you how to use waveforms to edit your dialogue faster. Check it out below:

This approach can be a lifesaver if you’re trying to edit within tight time constraints, but it does require you to get comfortable with waveforms. Luckily when it comes to this particular job, it’s really simple.

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Gnarbox Lets You Back Up, Edit, and Share Full-Res Videos—No Laptop Required

This durable, pocket-sized storage device may change the game for rugged field production and adventure filmmaking.

Gnarbox’s super simple workflow seems almost too good to be true. The 128GB storage unit lets you stick a micro-SD or SD card from any camera directly into its body for backup (or CF cards via a USB 3 card reader). Once you download the Gnarbox app on your iOS or Android device and connect it to the Gnarbox, you can edit full-res footage on your phone, too.

And you don’t even need an internet connection—the box has its own wifi hotspot.

Gnarbox
The Gnarbox dimensions are 5.3” x 3.4”.

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Watch: How Do You Actually Edit an Animated Movie?

A new video essay shows that on an animated film, the editor’s job is much more involved than you might think.

At first blush, it might seem like an animation editor’s job is counterintuitive. After all, everything is planned to a tee in advance: storyboards inform the animators, who then animate clips that are edited in the order they are written. Why does an animated film even need an editor?

In fact, as a new video from the Royal Ocean Film Society details, when it comes to animation, we should throw out all of our preconceived notions about editing—the process involves far more than what we expect from an editor.

During an animated production, the editor is brought on years before anything is actually filmed—sometimes, even before the director. And the editor’s job is among the most critical to an animated movie’s life. As Ken Schretzmann, editor of Toy Story 3 and Cars, says: “On live action, you shoot first and edit later. In animation, you edit first and then shoot it later.”

It’s the editor’s job to piece ever-evolving story ideas into animatics.

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