Daily Dialogue — December 31, 2016

“We find the defendant guilty as charged.”

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), screenplay by Horton Foote, novel by Harper Lee

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Failure, suggested by Melinda Mahaffey and Will King.

Trivia: Brock Peters, who played Tom Robinson in the film, delivered Gregory Peck’s eulogy on the date of his funeral and burial, Monday, June 16th, 2003.

Dialogue On Dialogue: The determination the jury makes in finding Tom guilty is a failure of justice. You can see it in the faces of the people involved once the foreman announces the verdict.

However the courage, even righteousness Atticus Finch demonstrates as the defendant’s lawyer is not a failure, witness the reactions of the African-Americans in the balcony.

This is a scene which NEVER fails to move me and I’ve watched it dozens of times. It is a clarion call for each human being to stand up for what is right, moral, and respectful of ALL human beings irrespective of race, religion, or creed. Something to carry with us as we enter 2017.


Daily Dialogue — December 31, 2016 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — December 30, 2016

“Perfectly dreadful.”

Citizen Kane (1941), original screen play by Herman J. Mankiewicz and Orson Welles

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Failure, suggested by Melinda Mahaffey and Will King.

Trivia: Writer Herman J. Mankiewicz was contractually bound not to drink during the film’s pre-production. Mankiewicz was a known alcoholic at the time. To help him, Orson Welles dispatched him out of Hollywood to the desert town of Victorville where drinking establishments were in shorter supply. Welles also sent producer John Houseman to mind Mankiewicz.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Apart from the song lyrics, the only dialogue in this painful sequence is a woman’s voice off-screen, then her derisive laugh. However it’s enough to jolt Kane out of his insulated little world in which he thinks Susan is performing wonderfully. The scene is capped off with one of the most memorable movie images of all-time: Kane clapping. Not even his force of will can overcome Susan’s failure as an opera singer.


Daily Dialogue — December 30, 2016 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

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