Daily Dialogue theme next week: Voice-Over

Join the Daily Dialogue crew: 3,327 consecutive days and counting.

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Voice-Over.

“Yes, I killed him… I killed him for money — and a woman — and I didn’t get the money and I didn’t get the woman…” Double Indemnity (1944)

This should be a breeze! Tons of movies use voice-over narration. What are your favorites?

What to do:

  • Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.
  • Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.
  • Any trivia about the movie which you think would be of interest to readers, we always welcome that.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway related to the craft of writing? If so, feel free to share your Dialogue On Dialogue.

Consecutive days of Daily Dialogue posts: 3,327.

Be a part of the proud Daily Dialogue tradition, post a suggestion in a RESPONSE, and have your name emblazoned on a blog post which will forever hold a hallowed spot in the Go Into The Story archives!

Upcoming schedule of themes:

July 3-July 9: Sacrifice [Denise Garcia]
July 10-July 16: Church
July 17-July 23: Scientific Explanation [Melinda Mahaffey]
July 24-July 30: Television
July 31-August 6: Transaction [Gisela Wehrl]
August 7-August 13: One Word
August 14-August 20: Broken [Gisela Wehrl]

If you have any suggestions for Daily Dialogue themes, please post them in a RESPONSE and I’ll be happy to consider them for the series.

Be sure to post your ideas for this week’s theme: Voice-Over.

Continued thanks to all of you Daily Dialogue devotees, your suggested dialogue and dialogue themes. Grateful for your ongoing support of this series!


Daily Dialogue theme next week: Voice-Over was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — June 24, 2017

“Rollo Tomasi.”

L.A. Confidential (1997), screenplay by Brian Helgeland & Curtis Hanson, novel by James Ellroy

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Unexpected Death, suggested by Angry Cyborg.

Trivia: Kevin Spacey had a great deal of difficulty playing dead. It was easy enough for him to stare straight ahead when there was another actor in front of him, but he first instinct was to follow James Cromwell with his eyes when he moved. He had to ask a production assistant to draw a circle for him to look at onto the opposite wall.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Shooting a guy to death just after you offer him a cup of coffee? Not only unexpected, but cold. However Vincennes (Kevin Spacey) gets the last laugh, his line “Rollo Tomasi” right up there with another famous name Spacey uttered: “Keyser Soze” (The Usual Suspects).


Daily Dialogue — June 24, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue theme next week: Unexpected Death

Join the Daily Dialogue crew: 3,320 consecutive days and counting.

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Unexpected Death, suggested by Angry Cyborg.

Ah, poor Boromir.

Not just death, but unexpected death. The demise of characters which surprises us. Hey, this is a big thing in TV nowadays. Which character who we didn’t expect got whacked this week? Let’s jump on that bandwagon and come up with some notable cinematic deaths of the unexpected kind.

What to do:

  • Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.
  • Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.
  • Any trivia about the movie which you think would be of interest to readers, we always welcome that.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway related to the craft of writing? If so, feel free to share your Dialogue On Dialogue.

Consecutive days of Daily Dialogue posts: 3,320.

Be a part of the proud Daily Dialogue tradition, post a suggestion in a RESPONSE, and have your name emblazoned on a blog post which will forever hold a hallowed spot in the Go Into The Story archives!

Upcoming schedule of themes:

June 26-July 2: Voiceover
July 3-July 9: Sacrifice [Denise Garcia]
July 10-July 16: Church
July 17-July 23: Scientific Explanation [Melinda Mahaffey]

If you have any suggestions for Daily Dialogue themes, please post them in a RESPONSE and I’ll be happy to consider them for the series.

Be sure to post your ideas for this week’s theme: Unexpected Death.

Continued thanks to all of you Daily Dialogue devotees, your suggested dialogue and dialogue themes. Grateful for your ongoing support of this series!


Daily Dialogue theme next week: Unexpected Death was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — June 5, 2017

HARRY: No! No!
FUDGE: For God’s sake, Dumbledore, what’s happened?
HARRY: He’s back! He’s back! Voldemort’s back! Cedrick, he asked me to bring his body back. I couldn’t leave him. Not there.
DUMBLEDORE: It’s all right, Harry, it’s all right. He’s home. You both are.
FUDGE: Keep everybody in their seats. A boy’s just been killed.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005), screenplay by Steve Kloves, novel by J.K. Rowling

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Triumph, suggested by Shannon Corbeil. Today’s recommendation by Will King.

Trivia: Early drafts had Ron’s estranged brother Percy appearing in a key supporting role but it was written out in the final drafts. In an interview, Chris Rankin, who plays Percy, revealed that his contract of the franchise stipulates that he must appear in four films; the first three, with the option of appearing in either this movie or the next one, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007). Given the fact that Percy appears much longer in the latter, he opted out of the film in favor of appearing in the next one.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Will: “A triumph can sometimes be the worst thing to do to a character. Harry, forced to participate in the Triwizard tournament, emerges the victor, but at the cost of the life of a friend he couldn’t save and with the realization that his mortal enemy, Voldemort, is now fully embodied and returning to power. Bringing Voldemort to life right at the height of what should be Harry’s triumph both raises the stakes and heightens the emotions when Harry should be able to celebrate overcoming all the odds that had been stacked against him. Instead, the crisis only deepens.”


Daily Dialogue — June 5, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — May 13, 2017

Harold Crick: I’m not exactly sure it was plot. I was hoping you’d say it was just a really bad coincidence.
Professor Jules Hilbert: Meeting an insurance agent the day your policy runs out is coincidence. Getting a letter from the emperor saying he’s visiting is plot. Having your apartment eaten by a wrecking ball… is something else entirely. Harold, you don’t control your fate.
Harold Crick: I know.
Professor Jules Hilbert: You do?

They leave the building to walk outside.

Professor Jules Hilbert: You were right. This narrator might very well kill you so I humbly suggest that you just forget all this and go live your life.
Harold Crick: Go live my life? I am living my life. I’d like to continue to live my life.
Professor Jules Hilbert: I know. Of course. I mean all of it. However long you have left. You know, I mean, Harold, you could use it to have an adventure. You know, invent something, or just finish reading ‘Crime and Punishment’. Hell, Harold, you could just eat nothing but pancakes if you wanted.
Harold Crick: What’s wrong with you? Hey. I don’t want to eat nothing but pancakes. I wanna live. I mean who in their right mind in a choice between pancakes and living chooses pancakes?
Professor Jules Hilbert: Harold, if you’d pause to think I believe you’d realize that that answer’s inextricably contingent upon the type of life being led and, of course, the quality of the pancakes. You don’t understand what I’m saying.
Harold Crick: Yes. I do. But you have to realize that this isn’t a philosophy or a literary theory or a story to me. It’s my life.
Professor Jules Hilbert: Absolutely. So just go make it the one you’ve always wanted.

Stranger Than Fiction (2006), written by Zach Helm

The Daily Dialogue theme for this week: Revelation, suggested by @etom212. Today’s recommendation by Nathan Eyre.

Trivia: The title of the movie comes from a famous quote from Lord Byron’s “Don Juan:” “Tis strange, but true; for truth is always strange; Stranger than fiction: if it could be told, How much would novels gain by the exchange! How differently the world would men behold!”

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Zach: “Immediately prior to this scene, at Professor Hilbert’s request, Harold had agreed to an experiment to determine whether or not he could control the outcome of the narration he’d been hearing in his head throughout the movie. When Professor Hilbert tells Harold that he doesn’t control his fate, his surprise at hearing Harold admit that he already knew that is evident (which begs the question why they needed to conduct the aforementioned experiment in the first place). This scene comes halfway through the movie and Harold’s behavior noticeably changes now that he’s accepted his fate. In this scene, both characters have their own revelation that determine how the plot unfolds from that point on.”


Daily Dialogue — May 13, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — May 11, 2017

FORD: Barman, six pints of bitter and quickly. The world’s about to end.
BARMAN: Six pints coming up.
FORD: Keep the change. You got about ten minutes to spend it.
ARTHUR: Three pints each? At lunchtime?
FORD: Sorry. Ah. Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so. And eat those peanuts, because you’ll need the salt.
ARTHUR: Look, what is going on, Ford?
FORD: Arthur… What if I told you I really wasn’t from Guildford? I was from a small planet somewhere in the vicinity of Betelgeuse?
ARTUHR: Is that something you’re likely to say?
FORD: Remember when we met?
ARTHUR [in flashback]: Out the way! Oof!
FORD [in flashback]: Hi.
FORD: Wasn’t it strange I was trying to shake hands with a car?
ARTHUR: I assumed you were drunk.
FORD: I thought cars were the dominant life form. I was trying to introduce myself. You saved my life that day. And now I’m saving yours. Please drink.
ARTHUR: It must be Thursday. I could never get the hang of Thursdays.
FORD: Look, Arthur, if this is about your house…
ARTHUR: No, it’s not about the house.

Phone beeps.

FORD: Who’s he?
ARTHUR: She. She. Tricia McMillan. We met at a fancy-dress party.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (2005), written by Douglas Adams and Karen Kirkpatrick, based on the novel by Douglas Adams

The Daily Dialogue theme for this week: Revelation, suggested by @etom212. Today’s recommendation by Gisela Wehrl.

Trivia: The producers have stated that this film is not a literal translation of the books (just as the books were not a literal translation of the original radio show), but all of the new ideas and characters came from Douglas Adams himself. The hired writer simply came aboard to improve structure and make the screenplay more coherent.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Gisela: “You get reveled that the world will come to an end — within 10 minutes. Additionally your best reveals you, that he is an alien. But you don’t take it seriously, you just care about why you didn’t get the girl.”


Daily Dialogue — May 11, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue theme next week: Revelation.

Join the Daily Dialogue crew: 3,278 consecutive days and counting.

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Revelation, suggested by @etom212.

What are some notable movie scenes in which some hidden truth gets revealed? Surely we can come up with 7 good ones.

What to do:

  • Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.
  • Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.
  • Any trivia about the movie which you think would be of interest to readers, we always welcome that.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway related to the craft of writing? If so, feel free to share your Dialogue On Dialogue.

Consecutive days of Daily Dialogue posts: 3,278.

Be a part of the proud Daily Dialogue tradition, post a suggestion in a RESPONSE, and have your name emblazoned on a blog post which will forever hold a hallowed spot in the Go Into The Story archives!

Upcoming schedule of themes:

May 15-May 21: Mealtime
May 22-May 28: Hospital [Angry Cyborg]
May 29-June 4: Seduction
June 5-June 11: Triumph [Shannon Corbeil]
June 12-June 18: Telephone
June 19-June 25: Unexpected Death [Angry Cyborg]
June 26-July 2: Voiceover
July 3-July 9: Sacrifice [Denise Garcia]
July 10-July 16: Church
July 17-July 23: Scientific Explanation [Melinda Mahaffey]

If you have any suggestions for Daily Dialogue themes, please post them in a RESPONSE and I’ll be happy to consider them for the series.

Be sure to post your ideas for this week’s theme: Revelation.

Continued thanks to all of you Daily Dialogue devotees, your suggested dialogue and dialogue themes. Grateful for your ongoing support of this series!


Daily Dialogue theme next week: Revelation. was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — April 26, 2017

“I’m gay!”

Almost Famous (2000), written by Cameron Crowe

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Coming Out, suggested by Angry Cyborg.

Trivia: John Fedevich, as Stillwater drummer Ed Vallencourt, speaks only one line, announcing (under duress) that he is gay.

Dialogue On Dialogue: A comedic take on coming out.


Daily Dialogue — April 26, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — April 25, 2017

Student: Is it true that you’re queer?

Jim ponders the question, then —

Jim: Yes, it’s true.

Nighthawks (1978), written by Ron Peck and Paul Hallam

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Coming Out, suggested by Angry Cyborg.

Trivia: Widely considered the first “commercial” or “commercially released” gay feature film ever made in the U.K., where the story was directly about gay relationships and themes, but which was not about crime (blackmail or murder), or purely stereotypical.

Dialogue On Dialogue: A pivotal moment in the movie in which Jim, who has kept his sexuality secret, admits his lifestyle. It happens late in this 70s era story and precipitates a spontaneous question-and-answer session with the students.


Daily Dialogue — April 25, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — April 24, 2017

“1,2,3,4, I won’t take no anymore. 5,6,7,8 — I want you to be my mate. 1,2,3,4 — you’re the one that I adore. 5,6,7,8 — don’t run from me cause this is fate.”

But I’m a Cheerleader (1999), screenplay by Brian Wayne Peterson and Jamie Babbit

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Coming Out, suggested by Angry Cyborg. Today’s recommendation by Sarah Grimes.

Trivia: Cathy Moriarty asks a character if she wants to be a “raging bull-dyke.” Moriarty received an Oscar nomination for her role in Raging Bull (1980).

Dialogue On Dialogue: This is actually second coming out beat, but in publicly proclaiming her love Graham, Megan underscores her revelation.


Daily Dialogue — April 24, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

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