Daily Dialogue — April 26, 2017

“I’m gay!”

Almost Famous (2000), written by Cameron Crowe

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Coming Out, suggested by Angry Cyborg.

Trivia: John Fedevich, as Stillwater drummer Ed Vallencourt, speaks only one line, announcing (under duress) that he is gay.

Dialogue On Dialogue: A comedic take on coming out.


Daily Dialogue — April 26, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — April 25, 2017

Student: Is it true that you’re queer?

Jim ponders the question, then —

Jim: Yes, it’s true.

Nighthawks (1978), written by Ron Peck and Paul Hallam

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Coming Out, suggested by Angry Cyborg.

Trivia: Widely considered the first “commercial” or “commercially released” gay feature film ever made in the U.K., where the story was directly about gay relationships and themes, but which was not about crime (blackmail or murder), or purely stereotypical.

Dialogue On Dialogue: A pivotal moment in the movie in which Jim, who has kept his sexuality secret, admits his lifestyle. It happens late in this 70s era story and precipitates a spontaneous question-and-answer session with the students.


Daily Dialogue — April 25, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — April 24, 2017

“1,2,3,4, I won’t take no anymore. 5,6,7,8 — I want you to be my mate. 1,2,3,4 — you’re the one that I adore. 5,6,7,8 — don’t run from me cause this is fate.”

But I’m a Cheerleader (1999), screenplay by Brian Wayne Peterson and Jamie Babbit

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Coming Out, suggested by Angry Cyborg. Today’s recommendation by Sarah Grimes.

Trivia: Cathy Moriarty asks a character if she wants to be a “raging bull-dyke.” Moriarty received an Oscar nomination for her role in Raging Bull (1980).

Dialogue On Dialogue: This is actually second coming out beat, but in publicly proclaiming her love Graham, Megan underscores her revelation.


Daily Dialogue — April 24, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — April 23, 2017

GREGORY: You remember our first days. You remember Italy?
PAULA: There have been times when I thought I only dreamed those days.
GREGORY: Come closer, Paula. Closer. Look into my eyes. If I ever meant anything to you, and I believe I did… then help me, Paula. Give me another chance. Look, in the drawer of that cupboard there is a knife. Get it and cut me free. Be quick, Paula. Get me the knife. Cut me free. Would you get it, Paula? Would you get it for me?
PAULA: Yes, I’ll get it. I’ll get it for you.
GREGORY: Hurry, Paula.
PAULA: There’s no knife here.
GREGORY: Yes. I put it there.
PAULA: I don’t see any knife.
GREGORY: I put it there tonight.
PAULA: No, it isn’t here. You must have dreamed you put it there. Are you suggesting that this is a knife I hold in my hand? Have you gone mad, my husband? Or is it I who am mad? Yes, of course. That’s it. I am mad.

Gaslight (1944), written by John Van Deuten & Walter Reisch and John L. Balderston, based on the play by Patrick Hamilton

The Daily Dialogue theme for this week: Lying. Today’s suggestion by Gisela Wehrl.

Trivia: In MGM’s script, Charles Boyer was supposed to have told Ingrid Bergman at the end that he had loved her all along. This was an addition to the play made by the screenwriter. David O Selznick, when reading over the script, was horrified and promptly sent MGM one of his famous long and involved memos, this one ordering the studio to omit the line, which it did.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Gisela: “Gregory lies to Paula all the time to drive her crazy. This form of manipulation ‘that seeks to sow seeds of doubt in a targeted individual or members of a group, hoping to make targets question their own memory, perception, and sanity’ (Wikipedia) is called gaslighting — based on the movie’s title. When Gregory finally got caught, he still hopes to have power over Paula. And she tells him, she will help him. But she copies his lies. He insists two times, that he put the knife there as he cannot imagine, that Paula would lie to him. Just as Paula couldn’t imagine before, that her husband would lie to her. Seeing her with a knife in her hand and lying about holding it, makes obvious how malicious this manipulations operates.”


Daily Dialogue — April 23, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue theme next week: Coming Out

Join the Daily Dialogue crew: 3,264 consecutive days and counting.

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Coming Out, suggested by Angry Cyborg.

This could be a challenge as only a couple of movie moments came to mind, but if you help me out, I trust we can fill up an entire week’s worth of Daily Dialogue posts.

What to do:

  • Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.
  • Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.
  • Any trivia about the movie which you think would be of interest to readers, we always welcome that.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway related to the craft of writing? If so, feel free to share your Dialogue On Dialogue.

Consecutive days of Daily Dialogue posts: 3,264.

Be a part of the proud Daily Dialogue tradition, post a suggestion in a RESPONSE, and have your name emblazoned on a blog post which will forever hold a hallowed spot in the Go Into The Story archives!

Upcoming schedule of themes:

May 1-May 7: Meet Cute
May 8-May 14: Revelation [@etom212]
May 15-May 21: Mealtime
May 22-May 28: Hospital [Angry Cyborg]
May 29-June 4: Seduction
June 5-June 11: Triumph [Shannon Corbeil]
June 12-June 18: Telephone
June 19-June 25: Unexpected Death [Angry Cyborg]
June 26-July 2: Voiceover
July 3-July 9: Sacrifice [Denise Garcia]

If you have any suggestions for Daily Dialogue themes, please post them in a RESPONSE and I’ll be happy to consider them for the series.

Be sure to post your ideas for this week’s theme: Coming Out.

Continued thanks to all of you Daily Dialogue devotees, your suggested dialogue and dialogue themes. Grateful for your ongoing support of this series!


Daily Dialogue theme next week: Coming Out was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — April 22, 2017

OZ: You know what I think we need? A little music.
THEODORA: Is that magic?
OZ: In a way. It’s a music box. You’ve never seen one? This belonged to my grandmother. A czarina from Irkutsk.

Oz the Great and Powerful (2013), written by Mitchell Kapier and David Lindsay-Abaire, screen story by Mitchell Kapner, based on the“Oz“ Works by L. Frank Baum

The Daily Dialogue theme for this week: Lying. Today’s suggestion by Gisela Wehrl.

Trivia: Michelle Williams’ character Annie is marrying a man named John Gale. Director Sam Raimi has confirmed that Annie and John are intended to be the (previously unnamed) parents of Dorothy Gale, the main character in “The Wizard of Oz” (1939) and “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” (book), and a primary or secondary character in most of the other books.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Gisela: “It’s Oz’ usual lie to present pretty girls innumerable music box — from his fictitious grandmother. We have seen him before doing it. A lie which is easily to unmask, as there is no czarina from Irkutsk. But not for a witch living in the far, far world of Oz. And with this lie, Oz starts to conquer Theodora’s heart. And when it breaks the Wicked Witch of the West is born.”


Daily Dialogue — April 22, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Daily Dialogue — April 21, 2017

“This is the staircase of the palace.”

Sunset Blvd. (1950), written by Charles Brackett & Billy Wilder & D.M. Marshman Jr.

The Daily Dialogue theme for this week: Lying.

Trivia: Upon seeing the film at a star-studded preview screening at Paramount, MGM studio head Louis B. Mayer screamed at director Billy Wilder that he should be tarred, feathered and horse-whipped for bringing his profession into such disrepute. Wilder’s response was a terse, “Fuck you.”

Dialogue On Dialogue: Sometimes a character needs to lie to protect another character. Such is the case in this climactic scene as Max goes along with the ruse that Norma is filming a movie scene.


Daily Dialogue — April 21, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Watch: How to Use Waveforms to Quickly Edit Dialogue

There is an easier way to edit dialogue to make it a less labor-intensive and time-consuming task.

If you’ve ever had to edit a ton of footage with dialogue, you know that it can take forever to find your in and out points. You could scrub through your timeline to hear when each line begins and ends, which, again, can eat up time that you simply do not have, or you can take a much easier route by using the waveform in your NLE. In this video, Caleb Pike of DSLR Video Shooter shows you how to use waveforms to edit your dialogue faster. Check it out below:

This approach can be a lifesaver if you’re trying to edit within tight time constraints, but it does require you to get comfortable with waveforms. Luckily when it comes to this particular job, it’s really simple.

Read More

No Film School

Daily Dialogue theme next week: Insult

Join the Daily Dialogue crew: 3,236 consecutive days and counting.

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Cemetery, suggested by Angry Cyborg.

“Here’s Delmer, Woody’s cousin. He was a drunk. One time we were wrestling and he felt me up. Grabbed a handful of boob and Woody was right there and didn’t have a clue, did ya’, Woody?”

There are some memorable cemetery scenes in movies. This should be a good one to mine this week. Horror. Drama. Comedy. Should be able to hit the whole gamut!

What to do:

  • Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.
  • Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.
  • Any trivia about the movie which you think would be of interest to readers, we always welcome that.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway related to the craft of writing? If so, feel free to share your Dialogue On Dialogue.

Consecutive days of Daily Dialogue posts: 3,236.

Be a part of the proud Daily Dialogue tradition, post a suggestion in a RESPONSE, and have your name emblazoned on a blog post which will forever hold a hallowed spot in the Go Into The Story archives!

Upcoming schedule of themes:

April 3-April 9: Job Interview
April 10-April 16: Shame [Jenny McNabb]
April 17-April 23: Lying
April 24-April 30: Coming Out [Angry Cyborg]
May 1-May 7: Meet Cute
May 8-May 14: Revelation [@etom212]
May 15-May 21: Mealtime
May 22-May 28: Hospital [Angry Cyborg]
May 29-June 4: Seduction
June 5-June 11: Triumph [Shannon Corbeil]
June 12-June 18: Telephone
June 19-June 25: Unexpected Death [Angry Cyborg]
June 26-July 2: Voiceover

If you have any suggestions for Daily Dialogue themes, please post them in a RESPONSE and I’ll be happy to consider them for the series.

Be sure to post your ideas for this week’s theme: Insult.

Continued thanks to all of you Daily Dialogue devotees, your suggested dialogue and dialogue themes. Grateful for your ongoing support of this series!


Daily Dialogue theme next week: Insult was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Script Analysis: “The Invitation” — Part 5: Dialogue

Read the script for the acclaimed indie thriller and discuss this week.

Reading scripts. Absolutely critical to learn the craft of screenwriting. The focus of this bi-weekly series is a deep structural and thematic analysis of each script we read. Our daily schedule:

Monday: Scene-By-Scene Breakdown
Tuesday: Plot
Wednesday: Characters
Thursday: Themes
Friday: Dialogue
Saturday: Takeaways

Today: Dialogue.

Written by Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi.

Plot summary: While attending a dinner party at his former home, a man thinks his ex-wife and her new husband have sinister intentions for their guests.

Some questions to consider in relation to dialogue in The Invitation:

  • What do you consider to be the most memorable lines… and why?
  • Any notable callbacks (a line used once, then used again later in a different context)?
  • How about set-up & payoffs?
  • Any exposition that caught your eye for being handled exceptionally well?

Head to RESPONSES and let me know what dialogue in the script made the most impact on you.

Major kudos to Joni Brainerd for doing this week’s scene-by-scene breakdown.

To download a PDF of the breakdown for The Invitation, go here.

For Part 1, to read the Scene-By-Scene Breakdown, go here.

For Part 2, to read Major Plot Points, go here.

For Part 3, to read Characters, go here.

For Part 4, to read Themes, go here.

Tomorrow we shift our focus to the script’s dialogue.

Seize this opportunity and join in the conversation!

I hope to see you in the RESPONSE section about this week’s script: The Invitation.


Script Analysis: “The Invitation” — Part 5: Dialogue was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

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