Daily Podcast: Will We See An All-Female Avengers In The MCU? Avatar, New Mutants, Mindhunter, Weinstein

black widow movie

On the October 16, 2017 episode of /Film Daily, Peter Sciretta is joined by Hoai-Tran Bui and Jacob Hall to talk about the latest news, including the latest on Harvey Weinstein, Mindhunter season 2, The New Mutants, Avatar sequel casting, and is an all-female Marvel superhero movie in our future? At The Water Cooler, we’ll be talking about puppies, becoming new homeowners, movie pass, The Florida Project, David Fincher’s Mindhunters, and playing Stardew Valley.

You can subscribe to /Film Daily on iTunes, Google Play, Overcast and all the popular podcast apps (here is the RSS URL if you need it).

In The Water Cooler:

  • Peter adopted a new puppy named Gizmo and watched the first two episodes of David Fincher’s Mindhunters.
  • HT got her Movie Pass finally? Or saw The Florida Project
  • Jacob moved into a new house and started playing Stardew Valley.

In the News:

You can find more about all the stories we mentioned on today’s show at slashfilm.com. /Film Daily is published every weekday, bringing you the most exciting news from the world of movies and television as well as deeper dives into the great features from slashfilm.com. You can subscribe to /Film Daily on iTunes, Google Play, Overcast and all the popular podcast apps (RSS). We’re still very much experimenting with this podcast, please feel free to send your feedback to us at peter@slashfilm.com. Please rate and review the podcast on iTunes and spread the word! Thanks to Sam Hume for our logo.

The post Daily Podcast: Will We See An All-Female Avengers In The MCU? Avatar, New Mutants, Mindhunter, Weinstein appeared first on /Film.


/Film

Daily Dialogue — October 2, 2017

“Well, you’ve taken good care of your body. Such a waste.”

Casino Royale (2006), screenplay by Neal Purvis & Robert Wade and Paul Haggis, novel by Ian Fleming

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Interrogation.

Trivia: Ian Fleming once said on writing the “Casino Royale” novel: “Writing about 2,000 words in three hours every morning, ‘Casino Royale’ dutifully produced itself. I wrote nothing and made no corrections until the book was finished. If I had looked back at what I had written the day before, I might have despaired.”

Dialogue On Dialogue: One way to intensify the effect of torture is to create fear within the victim. Le Chiffre’s opening line in the scene does just that.


Daily Dialogue — October 2, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — September 30, 2017

ANNIE: Hold on. Take Sepulveda to Slauson to La Brea. Take La Brea north to Sixth into downtown. (on the phone) So what? You’ll be up late. I’m pulling an all-nighter too, so save the tears.
MAX: I’ll take the 105 east to the 110. That’s faster.
ANNIE: What?
MAX: I said, the 105 to the 110, that’ll get you there quicker.
ANNIE: The 110 turns into a parking lot around USC.
MAX: But once you get to La Brea north of Santa Monica, then it’s jammed.
ANNIE: The 110 north of the 10, you get people driving to Pasadena, and they drive slow.|
MAX: Yeah, they do, but what I do is I get off on Grand, and then I… Hey, surface roads is what you want, that’s what we’ll do.
ANNIE: Are we taking bets?
MAX: Are we?
ANNIE: But what if you’re wrong?
MAX: I don’t think I’m gonna be wrong, but if I am, the ride is free.
ANNIE: Okay, you got yourself a deal.

Collateral (2004), written by Stuart Beattie

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Transportation, suggested by Denise Garcia. Today’s recommendation by Gisela Wehrl.

Trivia: On-set, Jamie Foxx accidentally drove his car into Tom Cruise’s. Foxx was bemused to see that the crew immediately rushed to Cruise’s aid first, he being the bigger star.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Gisela: “L.A. it’s their hometown and both know it by heart. But Max is a also a master of his job and of words, therefore he will win the bet and will gain Annie’s respect and interest.

The scene is a great example how you can work with status. It changes Max’s role from a servant whom Annie gives orders to while not listening to him — to a interesting conversation partner.”


Daily Dialogue — September 30, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — September 29, 2017

Paul discovers the subway fares went up to $ 1.50 at midnight. He only has 97 cents. He pleads with the Subway Attendant.

Paul Hackett: Couldn’t you just give me one token, please?
Subway Attendant: I can’t do that. I may lose my job.

Paul looks around and sees no one else in the station.

Paul Hackett: Well, who would know… exactly?
Subway Attendant: I could go to a party, get drunk, talk to someone… who knows?

After Hours (1985), written by Joseph Minion

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Transportation, suggested by Denise Garcia.

Trivia: Joseph Minion’s script was his thesis for Columbia Film School. He got an “A” from his teacher, Yugoslavian director Dusan Makavejev.

Dialogue On Dialogue: One of my favorite movies. Combines compressed time frame and frustration comedy. Paul’s interaction with the Subway Attendant, then the Subway Cop is a great example of the humor throughout the movie.


Daily Dialogue — September 29, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue theme next week: Transportation

Join the Daily Dialogue crew: 3,418 consecutive days and counting.

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Transportation.

Let’s call this bad transportation.

Planes. Trains. Automobiles. And more. Look forward to your suggestions for movie transportation scenes.

Join the proud DDT tradition and thanks for your continued support!

What to do:

  • Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.
  • Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.
  • Any trivia about the movie which you think would be of interest to readers, we always welcome that.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway related to the craft of writing? If so, feel free to share your Dialogue On Dialogue.

Consecutive days of Daily Dialogue posts: 3,418.

Be a part of the proud Daily Dialogue tradition, post a suggestion in a RESPONSE, and have your name emblazoned on a blog post which will forever hold a hallowed spot in the Go Into The Story archives!

Upcoming schedule of themes:

October 2-October 8: Interrogation
October 9-October 15: Homecoming [Gisela Wehrl]
October16-October 22: Computer

If you have any suggestions for Daily Dialogue themes, please post them in a RESPONSE and I’ll be happy to consider them for the series.

Be sure to post your ideas for this week’s theme: Transportation.

Continued thanks to all of you Daily Dialogue devotees, your suggested dialogue and dialogue themes. Grateful for your ongoing support of this series!


Daily Dialogue theme next week: Transportation was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — September 19, 2017

Micky: Boxing’s a chess game. I’m gonna pick my punches, take him down. Go head body head body.
Charlene: What is ‘head body head body’?
Micky: I hit him in the head, then his hands have gotta go up to protect himself, that opens up his body, so when I hit him in the body, his hand goes back down, hit him in the head, hand goes back up, him in the body. Ya’ know, people who don’t know fighting think you do a lot of damage in the head, but you do more from the body. So whaddya think? Can I take you out?

The Fighter (2010), screenplay by Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson, story by Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson & Keith Dorrington

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Bar.

Trivia: Christian Bale got involved, when Mark Wahlberg asked him to take part in the movie. Wahlberg happened to know Bale through their daughters studying in the same elementary school.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Subtext. Head. Body. Head. Body. There is a physicality to the subject matter which translates into some heat between the two characters.


Daily Dialogue — September 19, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — September 4, 2017

Summer: We’ve been like Sid and Nancy for months now.
Tom: Summer, Sid stabbed Nancy, seven times with a kitchen knife, I mean we have some disagreements but I hardly think I’m Sid Vicious.
Summer: No, I’m Sid.
Tom: Oh, so I’m Nancy…

Pancakes arrive.

Summer: Let’s just eat and we’ll talk about it later. Mmm, that is good, I’m really glad we did this. I love these pancakes… What?

Tom gets up and walks away from the table.

Summer: Tom, don’t go! You’re still my best friend!

(500) Days of Summer (2009), written by Scott Neustadter, Michael H. Weber

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Break-Up.

Trivia: Around the time of the movie’s release, director Marc Webb shot a short video for the Internet, which featured Zooey Deschanel as Sid Vicious and Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Nancy Spungen, in reference to a conversation in this movie.

Dialogue on Dialogue: “You’re still my best friend.” Like salt in the wounds.

And here is the previously mentioned Sid and Nancy video:

And for good measure another video the pair did to promote (500) Days:


Daily Dialogue — September 4, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — August 29, 2017

“God… dear Father in Heaven. I’m not a praying man, but if you’re up there and you can hear me, show me the way. I’m at the end of my rope.”

It’s a Wonderful Life (1946), screenplay by Francis Goodrich, Albert Hackett and Frank Capra

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: All Is Lost, suggested by Gisela Wehrl.

Trivia: All that snow in the movie? Comprised of potato peelings.

Dialogue On Dialogue: “I’m at the end of my rope.” About as stark an All Is Lost side of dialogue as you can get.

The line is an oblique reference to suicide (by hanging) which sets the table for this crisis moment in George Bailey’s life… and a most unusual answer to his desperate prayer.


Daily Dialogue — August 29, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — August 26, 2017

“There are two kinds of people in this world — winners and losers. Inside each and every one of you at the very core of your being is a winner waiting to be awakened and unleashed upon the world. With my nine-step “Refuse to Lose” program you now have the necessary tools and the insights and the know-how to put your losing habits behind you and to go out and make your dreams come true.”

Little Miss Sunshine (2006), written by Michael Arndt

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Advice. Today’s suggestion by Gisela Wehrl.

Trivia: Michael Arndt, who wrote the Oscar-winning screenplay for Little Miss Sunshine, used the supporting character name “Stan Grossman” (here played by Bryan Cranston) as a tribute to Fargo, another Best Original Screenplay (where the character was played by Larry Brandenburg).

Dialogue On Dialogue: Of course, Richard’s advice is precisely the opposite of the underlying meaning of the movie. That is provided by Duane:

“Do what you love and fuck the rest.” Another way of saying, “Follow your bliss.” That’s advice we ALL need to hear… and live by.


Daily Dialogue — August 26, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — August 21, 2017

“I want your full attention, Starling. Be very careful with Hannibal Lecter. Dr. Chilton at the asylum will go over all the physical procedures used with him. Do not deviate from them for any reason whatsoever. And you’re to tell him nothing personal, Starling. Believe me, you don’t want Hannibal Lecter inside your head.”

The Silence of the Lambs (1991), screenplay by Ted Tally, novel by Thomas Harris

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Advice.

Trivia: When characters are talking to Starling, they often talk directly to the camera. When she is talking to them, she is always looking slightly off-camera. Director Jonathan Demme has explained that this was done so as the audience would directly experience her POV, but not theirs, hence encouraged the audience to more readily identify with her.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Although more of an order than advice, this is a setup for a payoff. Not only does Clarice tell Lecter a lot of personal details per their quid pro quo agreement, she definitely lets Lecter get “inside her head,” which enables her to confront her greatest fear.


Daily Dialogue — August 21, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

1 2 3 4 12