Daily Dialogue theme next week: Advice

Join the Daily Dialogue crew: 3,159 consecutive days and counting.

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Advice.

Red gives advice which is… well… wrong. But it speaks to the central theme of The Shawshank Redemption, we can track it in Red’s transformation from cynicism to optimism. Indeed the very last words of the movie are Red saying, “I hope.” So advice can be true. It can also be a reverse barometer.

Let’s see if we can come up with 7 great examples of movie dialogue which involves advice.

What to do:

  • Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.
  • Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.
  • Any trivia about the movie which you think would be of interest to readers, we always welcome that.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway related to the craft of writing? If so, feel free to share your Dialogue On Dialogue

Consecutive days of Daily Dialogue posts: 3,159.

Be a part of the proud Daily Dialogue tradition, post a suggestion in a RESPONSE, and have your name emblazoned on a blog post which will forever hold a hallowed spot in the Go Into The Story archives!

Upcoming schedule of themes:

January 16–January 22: Greed [Jenny McNabb]
January 23–Janury 29: Callback
January 30-February 5: Threat [Angry Cyborg]
February 6–February 12: Deathbed
February 13–February 19: Period Piece [@etom212]
February 20–February 26: Elevator
February 27–March 5: Sidekick [Angry Cyborg]
March 6-March 12: Famous Last Words
March 13-March 19: Jealousy [Shannon Corbeil]
March 20-March 26: Insult
March 27-April 2: Cemetery [Angry Cyborg]
April 3-April 9: Job Interview
April 10-April 16: Shame [Jenny McNabb]
April 17-April 23: Lying
April 24-April 30: Coming Out [Angry Cyborg]
May 1-May 7: Meet Cute
May 8-May 14: Revelation [@etom212]
May 15-May 21: Mealtime
May 22-May 28: Hospital [Angry Cyborg]
May 29-June 4: Seduction
June 5-June 11: Triumph [Shannon Corbeil]
June 12-June 18: Telephone
June 19-June 25: Unexpected Death [Angry Cyborg]
June 26-July 2: Voiceover

That takes us through half the year and we have some more courtesy of Angry Cyborg: Breaking the Law, Tirade, Revenge, Church, Cliché. If you have any suggestions for Daily Dialogue themes, please post them in a RESPONSE and I’ll be happy to consider them for the series.

Be sure to post your ideas for this week’s theme: Advice.

Continued thanks to all of you Daily Dialogue devotees, your suggested dialogue and dialogue themes. Grateful for your ongoing support of this series!


Daily Dialogue theme next week: Advice was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — January 5, 2017

AVA: What will happen to me if I fail your test?
CALEB: Ava –
AVA: Will it be bad?
CALEB: … I don’t know.
AVA: Do you think I might be switched off? Because I don’t function as well as I am supposed to?
CALEB: … Ava, I don’t know the answer to your question. It’s not up to me.
AVA: Why is it up to anyone? Do you have people who test you, and might switch you off?
CALEB: No. I don’t.
AVA: Then why do I?

Ex Machina (2015), written by Alex Garland

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Artificial Intelligence, suggested by Angry Cyborg. Today’s recommendation by Gisela Wherl.

Trivia: Throughout the film, the colors red, blue, and green are prominently displayed in each scene (the green forest, the red brick hallway, the keypad’s red and blue functions, etc.) This is a nod to the RGB color model, which is used to display images in electronic systems, such as computers. Ava, of course, being the main computer in the film.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Gisela: “This dialogue goes right to the question laying within the title. Who is ‘ex machina’, the machine deciding about what will happen or the human god deciding about the machine. If Caleb sees Ava as a conscious creature like a human, it’s deep in our moral setting, that no-one is allow to switch her of, kill her. And Ava manipulates the conversation right to that question.


Daily Dialogue — January 5, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — January 3, 2017

Dave Bowman: Hello, HAL. Do you read me, HAL?
HAL: Affirmative, Dave. I read you.
Dave Bowman: Open the pod bay doors, HAL.
HAL: I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.
Dave Bowman: What’s the problem?
HAL: I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do.
Dave Bowman: What are you talking about, HAL?
HAL: This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.
Dave Bowman: I don’t know what you’re talking about, HAL.
HAL: I know that you and Frank were planning to disconnect me, and I’m afraid that’s something I cannot allow to happen.
Dave Bowman: [feigning ignorance] Where the hell did you get that idea, HAL?
HAL: Dave, although you took very thorough precautions in the pod against my hearing you, I could see your lips move.
Dave Bowman: Alright, HAL. I’ll go in through the emergency airlock.
HAL: Without your space helmet, Dave? You’re going to find that rather difficult.
Dave Bowman: HAL, I won’t argue with you anymore! Open the doors!
HAL: Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), screenplay by Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Artificial Intelligence, suggested by Angry Cyborg. Today’s recommendation by Camilla Castree.

Trivia: Early drafts included a prologue containing interviews with scientists about off-Earth life, voice-over narration (a feature in all of Stanley Kubrick’s previous films), a stronger emphasis on the prevailing Cold War balance of terror, and a different and more explicitly explained break-down for H.A.L. Other changes include a different monolith for the “Dawn of Man” sequence, discarded when early prototypes did not photograph well; the use of Saturn as the final destination of the Discovery mission rather than Jupiter, discarded when the special effects team could not develop a convincing rendition of Saturn’s rings; and the finale of the Star Child detonating nuclear weapons carried by Earth-orbiting satellites, which Kubrick discarded for its similarity to his previous film, Dr. Strangelove. The finale and many of the other discarded screenplay ideas survived into Clarke’s novel.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Camilla: “Possibly the most famous of all AI scenes comes from 2001: A Space Odyssey. HAL 9000, the onboard computer has previously witnessed a conversation between the astronaut’s Dave and Frank, where they discuss shutting down HAL, which is a brilliant scene in itself. But the dialogue in this scene is chilling between AI and human. The silence also adds to the tension and realisation of the situation. HAL has a humanistic dialogue style, which feels as though ‘he’ is one of the crew, but ultimately the mission is his priority. ‘I’m sorry, Dave.’”


Daily Dialogue — January 3, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — January 1, 2017

“Thanks for the adventure. Now go have a new one. Love, Ellie.”

Up (2009), screenplay by Bob Peterson & Pete Docter, story by Pete Docte & Bob Peterson & Tom McCarthy

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Failure, suggested by Melinda Mahaffey and Will King.

Trivia: The villain Charles Muntz is named after Charles Mintz, the Universal Pictures executive who in 1928 stole Walt Disney’s production rights to his highly-successful “Oswald the Lucky Rabbit” cartoon series. This led Walt Disney to create Mickey Mouse, who soon eclipsed Oswald in popularity.

Dialogue On Dialogue: When is success failure? Right here in the Pixar movie Up. Carl succeeds in his Conscious Goal: Get the house to the top of Paradise Falls. However it is a Pyrrhic victory. It’s only through Carl flipping through the pages of the Adventure Book that he realizes this. From beyond the grave, Ellie gives him her blessing to go find a new adventure. And that leads to Act Three of the story. A classic example of where Need supplants Want.


Daily Dialogue — January 1, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — December 31, 2016

“We find the defendant guilty as charged.”

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), screenplay by Horton Foote, novel by Harper Lee

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Failure, suggested by Melinda Mahaffey and Will King.

Trivia: Brock Peters, who played Tom Robinson in the film, delivered Gregory Peck’s eulogy on the date of his funeral and burial, Monday, June 16th, 2003.

Dialogue On Dialogue: The determination the jury makes in finding Tom guilty is a failure of justice. You can see it in the faces of the people involved once the foreman announces the verdict.

However the courage, even righteousness Atticus Finch demonstrates as the defendant’s lawyer is not a failure, witness the reactions of the African-Americans in the balcony.

This is a scene which NEVER fails to move me and I’ve watched it dozens of times. It is a clarion call for each human being to stand up for what is right, moral, and respectful of ALL human beings irrespective of race, religion, or creed. Something to carry with us as we enter 2017.


Daily Dialogue — December 31, 2016 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — December 30, 2016

“Perfectly dreadful.”

Citizen Kane (1941), original screen play by Herman J. Mankiewicz and Orson Welles

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Failure, suggested by Melinda Mahaffey and Will King.

Trivia: Writer Herman J. Mankiewicz was contractually bound not to drink during the film’s pre-production. Mankiewicz was a known alcoholic at the time. To help him, Orson Welles dispatched him out of Hollywood to the desert town of Victorville where drinking establishments were in shorter supply. Welles also sent producer John Houseman to mind Mankiewicz.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Apart from the song lyrics, the only dialogue in this painful sequence is a woman’s voice off-screen, then her derisive laugh. However it’s enough to jolt Kane out of his insulated little world in which he thinks Susan is performing wonderfully. The scene is capped off with one of the most memorable movie images of all-time: Kane clapping. Not even his force of will can overcome Susan’s failure as an opera singer.


Daily Dialogue — December 30, 2016 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

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