Daily Dialogue — February 23, 2017

KARL: What do you think of this heat?
JOHN McCLANE: Indian summer, huh?
KARL: Feels like it’s going to rain like dogs and cats later. Here’s one of your guys. Detective, uh, Otto, isn’t it?
JOHN McCLANE: John McClane.
KARL: Mike, how you doing? I keep telling myself I’m going to take the stairs just for the exercise… but on a hot day like this, it seems I always end up riding the lift.
JOHN McCLANE: What was the lottery number last night? You play the lottery? No? My wife buys me two tickets every week. Plays the same two numbers all the time. I say, “Why don’t you play a different number?“ She goes, “Those are my lucky numbers.“ I got the tickets right here-

Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1996), written by Jonathan Hensleigh, certain original characters by Roderick Thorp

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Elevator. Today’s suggestion by Gisela Wehrl.

Trivia: Jonathan Hensleigh was actually detained by the FBI after completing the script for the film because he knew extensive information about the Federal Gold Reserve in downtown Manhattan. Hensleigh stated that he got all the information from an article written in the New York Times.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Gisela: “This is one of the scene, where you convinced that John McClane is a real cop. He feels by heart, who the bad guys are! But the dialogue gives him some clues as well. The impostor cop mixes dogs and cats and talks about the lift instead of elevator. The next clue is a silent one — McClane sees the NYPD badge with his friend’s number. Therefore McClane talks about the lottery (as it was planted in the beginning of the movie). It gives him a reason to grab into his jacket. That’s one thing, what makes the Die Hard series so funny, McClane sometimes talks himself out of a situation. That he survives the shooting with several guns within an elevator (and ricochets), that’s due to the action genre.”


Daily Dialogue — February 23, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — February 22, 2017

ZURG: Surrender, Buzz Lightyear. I have won.
BUZZ: I’ll never give in. You killed my father!
ZURG: No, Buzz, I am your father.
BUZZ: Noooooo!

Toy Story 2 (1999), screenplay by Andrew Stanton, Rita Hsiao, Doug Chamberlin and Chris Webb, original story by John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Ash Brannon and Andrew Stanton

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Elevator. Today’s suggestion by Will King.

Trivia: The box that Zurg comes out of, in Al’s Toy Barn, has “Printed in Point Richmond” written on it. Pixar’s offices were in Point Richmond in Richmond, California, when the movie was made.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Will: “Pixar’s delightful spoof of the iconic Star Wars scene.”


Daily Dialogue — February 22, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — February 21, 2017

“We chose. In the cellar, all that shit we were playing with. They made us choose. They made us choose how we die.”

The Cabin in the Woods (2012), written by Joss Whedon, Drew Goddard

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Elevator.

Trivia: The being with the golden sphere is named in the credits as “Fornicus, Lord of Bondage and Pain”.

Dialogue On Dialogue: In the script, the scene description is: “”An endless array of elevators. Monsters in every single one. It’s the CostCo of death.” Accurate.


Daily Dialogue — February 21, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — February 20, 2017

“There is no spoon.”

— The Matrix (1999), written by Lilly Wachowski & Lana Wachowski (as The Wachowski Brothers)

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Elevator. Today’s suggestion by Will King.

Trivia: All scenes that take place within the Matrix have a green tint, as if watching them through a computer monitor, while scenes in the real world have a blue tint, blue was also used at a minimum in the matrix scenes since the directors thought blue was more of a real world color despite, ironically, blue being the least often occurring color in nature. The fight scene between Morpheus and Neo, which is neither in the real world nor in the Matrix, is tinted yellow.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Will: “This is a callback to an earlier conversation Neo had while waiting to meet the Oracle for the first time.”

SPOON BOY: Do not try and bend the spoon. That’s impossible. Instead, only try to realize the truth.
NEO: What truth?
SPOON BOY: There is no spoon.
NEO: There is no spoon?
SPOON BOY: Then you’ll see that it is not the spoon that bends. It is only yourself.

Neo is approaching his final showdown with Agent Smith, and one piece of the puzzle he needs to solve is how to overcome the all-powerful agents. He has tried and failed to win on the agents’ terms, in terms of the illusory world of The Matrix. Neo now reminds himself of that illusion, that he must realize the truth. Only then can he “bend” to overcome the limits he thinks he must operate within (such as surviving being hauled to the top of an elevator shaft by the falling weights or dodging bullets).


Daily Dialogue — February 20, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — February 19, 2017

“Dearest Cecilia, the story can resume. The one I had been planning on that evening walk. I can become again the man who once crossed the surrey park at dusk, in my best suit, swaggering on the promise of life. The man who, with the clarity of passion, made love to you in the library. The story can resume. I will return. Find you, love you, marry you and live without shame.”

Atonement (2007), screenplay by Christopher Hampton, novel by Ian McEwan

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Period Piece, suggested by @etom212.

Trivia: James McAvoy considered the script the best he had ever read.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Period piece and romance go together like… well… period piece and romance. None better than Atonement.


Daily Dialogue — February 19, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — February 18, 2017

Scarlett: Sir, you should have made your presence known.
Rhett Butler: In the middle of that beautiful love scene. Now that wouldn’t have been very tactful would it?
Scarlett: Oh! You, sir, are no gentlemen.
Rhett Butler: And you, Miss, are no lady. [She is shocked and hurt] Don’t think I hold that against you. Ladies have never held any appeal for me.

Gone With the Wind (1939), screenplay by Sidney Howard, novel by Margaret Mitchell

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Period Piece, suggested by @etom212.

Trivia: At nearly four hours long, this is the longest running of all movies to win the Best Picture Academy Award.

Dialogue On Dialogue: The movie had to do homage to the dialogue in the beloved novel while playing to the strengths of the individual actors.


Daily Dialogue — February 18, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue theme next week: Elevator

Join the Daily Dialogue crew: 3,201 consecutive days and counting.

The Daily Dialogue theme for next week: Elevator.

“The characters you meet. Something happens to men in elevators. Must be the change of altitude. The blood rushes to their head or something.”

Think about it. A lot of memorable movie scenes take place in an elevator. It’s often a strange nexus point between characters. Complete strangers. Acquaintances. They know each other well. Or not. Generally features awkward conversation.

Let’s see if we can come up with 7 good examples of elevator movie dialogue.

What to do:

  • Copy/paste dialogue from IMDb Quotes or some other transcript source.
  • Copy/paste the URL of an accompanying video from YouTube or some other video source.
  • Any trivia about the movie which you think would be of interest to readers, we always welcome that.

I’d also ask you to think about why the dialogue is notable. Is there anything about the dialogue which provides some takeaway related to the craft of writing? If so, feel free to share your Dialogue On Dialogue

Consecutive days of Daily Dialogue posts: 3,201.

Be a part of the proud Daily Dialogue tradition, post a suggestion in a RESPONSE, and have your name emblazoned on a blog post which will forever hold a hallowed spot in the Go Into The Story archives!

Upcoming schedule of themes:

February 27–March 5: Sidekick [Angry Cyborg]
March 6-March 12: Famous Last Words
March 13-March 19: Jealousy [Shannon Corbeil]
March 20-March 26: Insult
March 27-April 2: Cemetery [Angry Cyborg]
April 3-April 9: Job Interview
April 10-April 16: Shame [Jenny McNabb]
April 17-April 23: Lying
April 24-April 30: Coming Out [Angry Cyborg]
May 1-May 7: Meet Cute
May 8-May 14: Revelation [@etom212]
May 15-May 21: Mealtime
May 22-May 28: Hospital [Angry Cyborg]
May 29-June 4: Seduction
June 5-June 11: Triumph [Shannon Corbeil]
June 12-June 18: Telephone
June 19-June 25: Unexpected Death [Angry Cyborg]
June 26-July 2: Voiceover

That takes us through half the year and we have some more courtesy of Angry Cyborg: Breaking the Law, Tirade, Revenge, Church, Cliché. If you have any suggestions for Daily Dialogue themes, please post them in a RESPONSE and I’ll be happy to consider them for the series.

Be sure to post your ideas for this week’s theme: Elevator.

Continued thanks to all of you Daily Dialogue devotees, your suggested dialogue and dialogue themes. Grateful for your ongoing support of this series!


Daily Dialogue theme next week: Elevator was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — February 17, 2017

Miss Minchin: [voiceover, as she leads Sara up to the attic] And because of the expenses you’ve incurred, everything you own now belongs to me: your clothes, your toys, everything, though it will hardly make up for the financial losses I’ve suffered. From now on, you must earn your room and board here. You will move to the attic with Becky and work as a servant. If you fail to meet the standards of this institution or if you don’t do as you’re told, you’ll be thrown out. And believe me, Sara, the streets of the city are not kind to homeless beggars. [as they arrive at the attic] You should report to Mabel in the kitchen promptly at 5 a.m. [sees Sara’s locket, then takes it away] I could have you arrested for taking this. You’re lucky I let you keep that doll. You may have the book, but another incident like this, and I will call the authorities. [lighting and thunder] I expect you to remember, Sara Crewe: you’re not a princess any longer.

A Little Princess (1995), screenplay by Richard LaGravenese and Elizabeth Chandler, novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Period Piece, suggested by @etom212.

Trivia: Remake of the 1917 movie The Little Princess starring Mary Pickford, adapted from the Burnett novel by Francis Marion.

Dialogue On Dialogue: It’s tricky writing period piece dialogue as one must evoke the era, yet not get in the way of modern audiences’ enjoyment. This is especially true of younger moviegoers and so the dialogue in the 1995 version of this movie has a more modern ring to it.


Daily Dialogue — February 17, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — February 15, 2017

“Let us think of the pain Christ suffered when they nailed him to the cross. Left him to hang there until he was dead. Think of his most beautiful body. Torn by the nails. The blood oozing over his hands which twitched with every hammer blow.”

The Devils (1971), screenplay by Ken Russell, based on the play by John Whiting, novel by Aldous Huxley

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Period Piece, suggested by @etom212.

Trivia: The film not only was banned in Italy but the government of that country threatened the actors Vanessa Redgrave and Oliver Reed to condemn them to three years in prison if they stepped on their territory.

Dialogue On Dialogue: When we think ‘period piece’, I’m guessing most of us default to the Drama genre. However a period piece can be any genre, witness the 1971 horror film The Devils. The dialogue not only had to feel authentic to the era, but also pass a theological test.


Daily Dialogue — February 15, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

Daily Dialogue — February 16, 2017

“I have a theory that there is something in the Italian landscape which inclines even the most stolid nature to romance.”

A Room With a View (1985), screenplay by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, novel by E.M. Forster

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Period Piece, suggested by @etom212.

Trivia: The film cast includes three Oscar winners: Maggie Smith, Daniel Day-Lewis, Judi Dench; and three Oscar nominees: Helena Bonham Carter, Denholm Elliott and Richard Robbins.

Dialogue On Dialogue: “Manners movies” are a particular type of period piece and in these films one has to pay special attention to the precise dialogue, befitting the sense of social propriety.


Daily Dialogue — February 16, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

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