Superhero Bits: Silver and Black Rumors, Nebula’s Past Is Much Darker Than We Know & More

Hulk - Brazilian Car Commercial

Which summer comic book movie took home the most Teen Choice Awards? What other Marvel Comics characters might be appearing in Silver and Black? Why don’t The Defenders meet in the premiere of the new series? Why did Geoff Johns leave Marvel Comics for DC Comics? What darkness is left unrevealed about Nebula‘s past in the Marvel Cinematic Universe? All that and more in this edition of Superhero Bits.

The cast of Arrow discusses what fans can expect from the sixth season premiere coming to The CW this fall.

Wonder Woman took home some Teen Choice Awards over the weekend, but so did Supergirl and The Flash.

Here’s some concept art from Ryan Meinerding showing the inside of the Spider-Man: Homecoming suit.

There’s a rumor that Chameleon could appear in Silver and Black, as well as Tarantula and Tombstone.

Here’s a quick teaser clip from The Defenders with Alexandra (Sigourney Weaver) holding Stick captive.

Marvel’s Spider-Man: Homecoming has officially pulled in over $ 700 million at the worldwide box office.

The Incredible Hulk is being used to help sell Renault cars down in Brazil in this action-packed commercial.

Joe Morton, who plays Dr. Silas Stone in Justice League, confirms his son, Cyborg, has resentment for him.

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Sony Pictures Sets ‘Spider-Man’ Spin-Off ‘Silver and Black’ for 2019, Pulls ‘Bad Boys 3’ from Calendar

Sony Pictures - Columbia Pictures - Silver and Black Release Date

Sony Pictures is setting and shuffling a handful of release dates for upcoming movies in 2018 and 2019.

Sony and their Columbia Pictures banner have set a release date for their second Spider-Man spin-off Silver and Black, as well as the sequel to the hit drug trafficking thriller Sicario. Meanwhile,the release dates for Barbie and Bad Boys 3 have been shuffled around along with a few more projects in the coming years. Get the Silver and Black release date and more information below.

First up, Sony Pictures seems to be going on all in this separate Spider-Man universe that will not be tied to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, nor involve the webslinger himself. After setting Venom starring Tom Hardy for an October 2018 debut, the studio has now staked out February 8, 2019 as the release date for Silver & Black.

For those who haven’t kept up with the title, Silver and Black will bring together two characters from Marvel Comics who frequently showed up in Spider-Man story arcs. There’s Silver Sable, a mercenary who hunts down war criminals, and Black Cat, a master thief not unlike Catwoman whose secret identity is Felicia Hardy, a character who became a love interest for Peter Parker in the comics. Beyond the Lights director Gina Prince-Bythewood is slated to direct, but we have no details on the story just yet.

Next, Sony Pictures also brought some bad news for Bad Boys fans eagerly awaiting a reunion of Will Smith and Martin Lawrence. Though the sequel titled Bad Boys for Life had been set for November 9, 2018, it has now been removed from the calendar entirely with no replacement date named yet. The movie has been pushed back several times now, and it’s starting to feel like a pipe dream rather than a project that will actually happen.

There will still be some action to behold from Sony in 2018 though as the Sicario sequel directed by Stefano Sollima has been slated to arrived on June 29, 2018. The film has been officially called Sicario 2: Soldado, and it brings back Benicio del Toro and Josh Brolin from the first movie, but Emily Blunt is sitting this one out.

Meanwhile, a few films have been delayed on Sony’s release calendar. The big screen Barbie movie has been pushed back to August 8, 2018 from a previous June 2018 date. Alethea Jones is still set to direct with Anne Hathaway playing the title doll from Mattel. Breaking Bad director Michelle MacLaren‘s feature film debut The Nightingale will arrive on January 25, 2019 instead of the previous August 2018 date, and the comedy Holmes and Watson with Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly as the detective duo (respectively) will now arrive on November 9, 2018 instead of the previously set August 2018 date.

Sony Pictures hasn’t had the best year in 2017, so hopefully their schedule for 2018 will offer up more positive results for them at the box office. Unfortunately, they won’t have an official new Spider-Man movie to help them, but maybe Venom will work out for them instead.

The post Sony Pictures Sets ‘Spider-Man’ Spin-Off ‘Silver and Black’ for 2019, Pulls ‘Bad Boys 3’ from Calendar appeared first on /Film.


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Silver and Black, Barbie and More Sony Release Date Changes

Sony announces release dates for Silver and Black, The Nightingale, and more

Sony announces release dates for Silver and Black, The Nightingale, and more

Sony Pictures just announced a slew of release date for upcoming films like the Black Cat and Silver Sable Marvel adaptation Silver and BlackThe Nightingale and more.

Silver and Black, which will be directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood (The Secret Life of Bees), was originally set to be released in October of 2018. The comic book adaptation will now hit theaters on February 8, 2019. The film will be up against The LEGO Movie 2 that day. There is currently no casting info for the film.

Bad Boys for Life has been pushed back from November 9, 2018 to a to-be-determined date. Director Joe Carnahan (The A-TeamThe Grey) left the project back in May. Will Smith (I Am Legend) has been on the long-gestating project and reportedly spoke to Martin Lawrence (Big Momma’s House) about it. “I saw Martin a few weeks ago,” Smith told BBC 1 in February 2016 (via The Verge). “I haven’t seen him for about two years. We just looked at each other. We hugged. In that moment, we knew we were making another ‘Bad Boys.’ We’re definitely doing another one.”

Will Ferrell (Step Brothers) and John C. Reilly’s (Talladega NightsHolmes & Watson is moving from August 3, 2018 to the original date for Bad Boys for Life, November 9, 2018, putting it in competition with Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

The upcoming Barbie movie was originally going to hit theaters on June 29, 2018 and reportedly changed stars back in July. Anne Hathaway (Les Miserables) is up to replace Amy Schumer (Train Wreck) as the lead and Fun Mom Dinner director Alethea Jones may direct. The film has moved to August 8, 2018, making the date 8/8/18. No word if the odd Wednesday release date means something, but 8’s are awfully curvy…

Game of Thrones and Westworld director Michelle MacLaren’s newest offering The Nightingale has moved from August 10, 2018 to January 25, 2019, a date free from other releases at the moment. Based on Kristin Hannah’s best-selling novel, the film tells the story of two sisters coming of age in France on the eve of World War II, and their struggle to survive and resist the German occupation of France.

The Sicario sequel Soldado has acquired a release date. The film will hit theaters on June 29, 2018 (Barbie‘s original release date) opposite I Feel Pretty and TagSicario 2: Soldado will follow the character Alejandro Gillick, played by Academy Award winner Benicio Del Toro. Josh Brolin will also be back as CIA Agent Matt Graver.

What do you think of the date announcements for Silver and Black and the rest? Let us know in the comments or tweet us @ComingSoonnet.

The post Silver and Black, Barbie and More Sony Release Date Changes appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

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Black List writers on the craft: Theme (Part 5)

Over the years, I have interviewed over 40 Black List screenwriters. This month, I am running a series featuring one topic per week related to the craft of writing.

This week: How do you understand and work with the concept of ‘theme’?

The diversity of responses among the Black List writers I have interviewed is fascinating. Monday we explored various articulations of what ‘theme’ is. Tuesday we looked at some writers who begin the story-crafting process with theme. Wednesday we hear from writers who discover theme during the writing process. Thursday we considered writers who carry a concern about theme: Not to come off as “preachy”. Today writers who emphasize the importance of theme being personal.

Stephanie Shannon: “Theme is really important to me. They emerged in my research– learning about what made “Alice in Wonderland” different from other children’s stories and learning about what was really special about Lewis Carroll and what was going on at Oxford at the time. In my research I found so many interesting things to mine in the story. I think I ended up embracing the themes that also meant something to me personally. Father/daughter relationships are an important theme with me. I think it was important to me that the theme not only serve the story but also was something that was close to my own heart personally. I think those are always the stories that I want to tell, that I’ll end up telling the best.”

Brian Duffield: “Usually it’s a theme I want to explore because it’s really locked into my head as a person, as something I’m going through or struggling or interested with, so even if I throw out the characters or genre surrounding that theme a dozen times, the theme stays intact because it’s an itch I need to scratch.”

Seth Lochhead: “I leave theme to my subconscious (I’ll let it come out as I pursue the more tangible elements of the story — although according to my previous answers, tangible doesn’t seem to be one of my writing pursuits). If I’m obsessed with something, if I’ve noticed something, some illness in the world, some crack in reality, I let it in and if it wants to come out in my work so be it.”

Spenser Cohen: “Movies are there to teach us about the human condition, what it’s like to be in difficult or impossible situations… Every writer has their own life experiences, their own point of view, so the way they see the world often dictates the theme.”

Geoff LaTulippe: “The good news is that, in talented writers, I think theme comes out organically. It’s not something you have to force. But it is something you have to consider, or why are you writing the fucking thing in the first place? Why bother?”

Takeaway:

  • You are more likely to write an empowered script if you have an emotional connection to its themes.
  • You can also reverse this: If you can identify your points of emotional connection to a story, there’s a good chance some of its themes are to be found there.

For Part 1 of this week’s series with Black List writers, go here.

Part 2, here.

Part 3, here.

Par 4, here.

For more insights from Black List writers on the craft, go here.


Black List writers on the craft: Theme (Part 5) was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Black List writers on the craft: Theme (Part 3)

Over the years, I have interviewed over 40 Black List screenwriters. This month, I am running a series featuring one topic per week related to the craft of writing.

This week: How do you understand and work with the concept of ‘theme’?

The diversity of responses among the Black List writers I have interviewed is fascinating. Monday we explored various articulations of what ‘theme’ is. Yesterday we looked at some writers who begin the story-crafting process with theme. Today we hear from writers who discover theme during the writing process.

Eric Heisserer: “Theme. That’s something that I have such a hard time engineering. If I were given nothing but the tool of ‘Here’s the theme. Write something with this theme,’ that’s an impossible task for me. I can’t start a story with that. I can figure out later on, after I’ve written a story, what the theme is. I can’t start with that in the forefront of my brain. It doesn’t work for me as a storyteller. I think other people can. I’m not saying that it’s impossible for anybody else. I’m just saying it’s not how I’m wired.

James DiLapo: “I think theme is immensely important, but for me, it’s not always readily apparent when I begin the process. With ‘Devils At Play’ we were talking about the idea of redemption, that there can be angels and devils inside our own personalities and societies. That, for me, is the theme of the story, but I didn’t know it when I began. Eventually the story itself will tell you what the theme is.”

Nikole Beckwith: “I think it definitely evolves over time. I’m sure that there are things that I carry around with me while I’m writing and they emerge on their own, I don’t say, ‘I’m going to write something that explores identity.’ That’s all I do, immerse myself in it.”

Aaron Guzikowski: “Definitely that they emerge whenever I’m writing the story. I definitely think a little bit about it at the beginning, but usually it’s more after you’re writing the story, the theme just emerges. If it’s a story that’s working, then themes generally just start to bleed out of it, and they just present themselves to you. They just appear.”

Julia Hart: “My students would always get frustrated when we would talk about the themes that the author was using. They would always ask, ‘Did they really think about all this before they started writing it?’ And I don’t think that they do or I don’t think that good writers do. Of course when you’re writing a cohesive world the themes are going to rise out of it.”

Lisa Joy: “I don’t necessarily start with theme, but by the time I’m done — I always have one. And often, writing a script shows me what my theme is and allows me to deepen my own thinking on that theme. Writing becomes, in its own way, a philosophical investigation into theme. Sometimes I go back, once I understand the theme more fully and use it in the rewrite to enrich the scenes.”

Chris Borrelli: “If you don’t have a theme as you write, then you are writing blind… Sometimes the theme presents itself. Usually other themes present themselves as I write, and I’ve had a theme or two change as I write, but still become something I care about…I want to say. That’s the jumping off point for me…something I care about…something I want to say.”

Justin Marks: “I think theme comes very late in outlining. I don’t think it comes immediately at the beginning. I think at the beginning it’s a character that you really like, or it’s a hook that you want to figure out. I don’t think it becomes a movie, though, until you find that theme. Until it centers on some idea that is not specific to the plot. I think you need to know theme before you start writing dialogue. I think you need to know theme before you start writing scene work.”

Declan O’Dwyer: “Thematically, I try to be governed by what my character is telling me it should be and not what I’m deciding it is on the outset, because it will grow and it will change as they grow and change.”

Daniel Kunka: “For me, theme is usually something I find as I write through the first draft. I probably have a general idea when I start, but theme becomes the unifying factor as I go. I always work better sort of discovering it rather than coming up with something early in the process or even before I start writing pages. That’s not to say it’s not there, but I don’t consciously make the decision ‘this is my theme.’ I think theme is directly related to voice. A lot of my themes are similar, because those are the stories I want to tell. And it’s not planned, it just is. Because of that I’ll sort of trust my theme to tag along with me until I’m done with the first draft, then the second draft is when I’ll go back in and add a few lines here or there to highlight some things that will help take the piece to the level I want it.”

Brad Ingelsby: “I don’t like to go into a script saying, ‘I want to write a story about forgiveness,’ and then try to fit forgiveness into every single scene. That feels maudlin and a bit silly to try to imbue every scene with a theme. It feels like a homework assignment and it doesn’t allow for much discovery or revelation. After all, you’ve already told yourself what the movie is about. You’ve limited yourself. What I prefer to do is say, here’s a character. I like this character and I know the journey I’d like him or her to go on. And then I write that journey, that arc, and then I let the audience or reader decide what the theme is. Let them take what they want from the story. If you say a movie is about forgiveness, then an audience or a reader is only looking for that theme in the material and there’s no discovery. But if you present them with a character on a journey, they’re able to take away from that character and that journey what they want. It’s less limiting, I think. Stories mean different things to different people.”

Justin Kremer: “With ‘McCarthy,’ people have said things to me on the thematic level — “oh, I enjoyed this thematic element of the script” — and I’m surprised by it. Often, that thematic element wasn’t even something that was intentional on my part. Reading is obviously inherently subjective and people can take away so many different things from a work. As long as you have a strong character and a clear arc, it tends to come together organically. Look at a classic like The Godfather, it can be this intimate father son story or an epic about American capitalism and the American dream.”

And why is theme so bloody damn important? How about this:

Stephany Folsom: “I think when I first find an idea that I’m not like, ‘Oh, gosh, let’s find the theme in this.’ But as I go through my steps to see whether or not this idea is going to be something that can actually make a good movie, one of my steps is, ‘What is going to be the theme?’”

And this:

Jason Hellerman: “I think theme is super important, but I let myself find what I’m afraid to talk about, and I let my fears and my own inhibitions dictate the theme of what I need to get off my chest.”

And this:

Chris McCoy: “A story theme is tremendously important, because it’s what you’re trying to say with the work as a whole. If there’s no theme, there’s nothing holding the script together.”

And there’s this:

Justin Marks: “Look at how Chris Nolan writes. Everything is written to theme. Everything comes back to that. That’s what makes the Batman movies so great is that they’re always about theme. Every scene is about guiding itself towards theme. When you don’t know what a scene is supposed to be about, the answer is theme. Yeah. I think if you’re getting away from it, that’s when you ask, why doesn’t this scene feel right? Or, why doesn’t this sequence feel right? Or, why does the third act feel right? Oh yeah, because it has nothing to do with my theme. It has nothing to do with what I wanted this story to be about in the first place. If a script starts to meander beyond theme, I think you lose your reader. Because they start to wonder, ‘Why am I reading this? What am I getting from this story?’ You’re getting theme. If you don’t get it, you’re not going to read it.”

Takeaway:

  • Trust the process: If you go in the story… if you engage your characters… if you live in, then reflect upon the narrative… the themes will emerge.
  • Use your themes as a touchstone: For everything including how you approach scenes to how you handle character relationships to how you write scene description, from big to small, themes can help you expand your understanding of your story and focus how you convey it emotional meaning to a script reader.

How about you? Do you discover theme in your writing? How is theme important to you in your writing?

For Part 1 of this week’s series with Black List writers, go here.

Part 2, here.

Come back tomorrow for more about this important subject: Theme.

Comment Archive


Black List writers on the craft: Theme (Part 3) was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

2017 Annual Black List Feature Screenwriters Lab

Now open for submission for October 8–14, 2017 intensive writers workshop.

From the good folks at the Black List:

We are very pleased to announce that the opt-in period is now open for our 2017 Black List Feature Screenwriters Lab.

The Black List will invite six to eight promising non-professional writers to a weeklong, intensive writers workshop in Los Angeles, CA from October 8–14, 2017. All writers involved in the Lab will workshop one feature screenplay through one-on-one sessions with screenwriting mentors and in peer workshops. The weeklong program will also include attendance at several story-related events including screenings and Q&As with professional screenwriters and dinner with lit agents and managers.

The selection process will work like this:

The opt-in period will close at midnight on Sunday, August 27, 2017. On Monday, August 28, 2017, up to fifteen writers will be invited, based on the strength of their scripts as determined by the Black List, to submit a professional resume and one-page personal statement due on Thursday, August 31, 2017. From those personal statements, Lab screenwriting mentors and the Black List will select six to eight writers to participate in the Lab. Finalists will be notified on September 5, 2017.

Evaluations purchased before midnight on Thursday, July 27, 2017 will be guaranteed consideration. Please note, purchase of an evaluation is not required for consideration to participate in The Feature Lab.

Air travel (coach class roundtrip flights within the continental United States) and accommodations will be provided by the Black List. If you are accepted into the Lab, you will be required to board in the provided accommodations for the duration of the program. The Feature Lab is a residential program.

Writers are also available to opt-in for the Sloan Fellowship being offered in 2017:

  • The Black List’s 2017 Sloan Foundation Fellow at the 4th Annual Black List Feature Screenwriters Lab will be a science- and technology-focused writer with a science-rooted feature screenplay. Mentoring opportunities for the Sloan Fellow will continue throughout the year following the Lab. Writers will have the opportunity to be considered for this fellowship by selecting the “Sloan Foundation Fellow” option during the opt-in process.
  • Writers applying for the Sloan Fellowship are encouraged to have a science advisor for the project. Scripts that are selected for the short list will be asked to submit the name and title of the advisor, a brief description of their scientific area of expertise, and a statement that he/or she has read the script and attests that it is accurate. Writers are encouraged to submit this information in advance of the short list announcement as well.

Beginning today, writers who meet the below criteria can opt their scripts into consideration for the Labs selection process during the uploading process or the “My Scripts” portion of the website:

  • You are the sole and exclusive author of the feature screenplay submitted for consideration.
  • You have not received more than $ 100K in aggregate to date as compensation for film or television writing work.
  • If selected on August 28, 2017 as one of the up to fifteen writers invited to submit a professional resume and one page personal statement for additional consideration, you will deliver that personal statement by noon PST on August 31, 2017.
  • If selected for participation in the Lab program on September 5, 2017, you are available to participate in the Lab program in Los Angeles, CA on October 8–14, 2017.

Needless to say, we are excited by this opportunity to continue the educational work of the Black List with this singular opportunity to highlight and support up-and-coming television and film writing talent.

If you have any questions about the process, please check out our FAQ.

Make a note of the August 27th deadline and don’t miss your chance. We look forward to seeing you in Los Angeles this fall!

The Black List

2014 Black List Screenwriting Lab session in Las Vegas

This will be the 4th Black List Feature Screenwriters Lab to go along with 5 mini-labs hosted in 2015. I have been a mentor at each one and am happy to report I will be participating again at this year’s event. Mentors at previous labs include Jessica Bendinger, Max Borenstein, Stephany Folsom, Derek Haas, Eric Heisserer, Brian Koppelman, Graham Moore, Billy Ray, Kirsten “Kiwi” Smith, and Beau Willimon.

To get a sense of how impactful these labs have been for participating writers, go here to read observations from past selectees.

To learn more about the 2017 Black List Feature Screenwriters Lab, go here.

Hope to see you there!


2017 Annual Black List Feature Screenwriters Lab was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

Black List writers on the craft: Characters (Part 4)

Over the years, I have interviewed over 40 Black List screenwriters. This month, I will run a series featuring one topic per week related to the craft of writing.

This week: How do you develop your characters?

Reading through all of the responses was a fascinating exercise. Once again, this group of writers demonstrates there is no one way to approach the craft. Their respective approaches to developing their story’s characters vary from highly intuitive, even instinctual to the conscious use of specific techniques and writing exercises. In all cases, the goal is the same: To make the characters come alive in the writer’s imagination and onto the printed page.

On Monday, we featured writers who start their character development process by focusing on real people. Tuesday writers zeroed in on brainstorming and the importance of asking questions about and to characters. Yesterday we checked in with writers who use biographies as a tool for character development. Today we see how some Black List writers use scene-writing to find a character’s voice:

Ashleigh Powell: “For me, how my characters speak informs a lot about who they are and how they see the world. Really nailing down that voice helps me shape their character traits from there.”

Spenser Cohen: “One thing that I do when I first start writing is to put the outline aside and just start trying to find the character’s voice. I’ll give myself space to explore, and I just let the characters go. No one’s going to see it. No one’s going to read it. There’s no pressure. It’s their story, and I let whatever happens, happen. I’ll often make up a scene that’s not in the outline and might not even make sense for the story… It’s almost like a rehearsal before you jump in and start doing the real work. Just exploring. Often in these rough passes the characters start to take shape.”

Julia Hart: “Just through writing the scenes of their dialogue. I write a ton and then I’ll cut a bunch of it out. I’ll write like seven lines where there needs to be one and just cut around that one right line and keep going. I find their voices by having them say too much, by writing down every thought that would be in their head and then cutting off the fat.”

No matter the writing, the goal is to get inside the character’s head:

Eric Heisserer: “If I need to develop the character further, typically that’s the harder work of trying to figure out what part of the story I’m not writing about. If I have to…and I hate it, but I’ve had to do this before…I will write act zero — what happens to a character before the story in my script begins — so I have a deeper understanding of where this character came from.”

James DiLapo: “Whenever I struggled with lines in “Devils At Play” I would stop and would run the whole story in my head from the character’s perspective, trying to feel what they are feeling and thinking how they would. It’s not always easy. I think that’s probably the hardest element of screenwriting. You have to find a way to stretch beyond your own understanding and become, for a moment, someone who is so foreign to the way you live your life. In my experience, however, the more you do it, the better you get at it.”

Takeaway:

  • Feel free to write free. Free-standing scenes. Free-standing monologues. Give yourself “space to explore”. Write down “every thought” the character has and see what sticks.
  • For some writers, a character’s personality may shape their voice, however the inverse can work, too. Nailing down their voice can “shape” their character traits.
  • Do what you need to do to get inside their head. Feel what “they are feeling.” Think how “they would.” Write “act zero,” exploring what happened to the character before FADE IN. To riff off the name of this blog… go into the characters.

How about you? Do you write free-standing scenes to explore your characters? How do you go about finding a character’s voice? What do you do to get inside their head?

For Part 1 of this week’s series on character development, go here.

Part 2, here.

Part 3, here.

Tomorrow we take up another angle on prep-writing as reflected on by Black List writers.

Comment Archive


Black List writers on the craft: Characters (Part 4) was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story — Medium

First Teaser Trailer for Ryan Coogler’s ‘Black Panther’ Movie for Marvel

Black Panther Trailer

«What do you know about Wakanda?» Disney has premiered the first teaser trailer for Marvel’s Black Panther movie, directed by the talented Ryan Coogler (Fruitvale Station, Creed). The story picks up with King T’Challa, once again played by Chadwick Boseman, returning back to his African nation of Wakanda after the events of Captain America: Civil War. There he encounters new enemies that want to challenge his seat on the throne, and destroy Wakanda. The outstanding ensemble cast Coogler has assembled includes Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker, Andy Serkis, Florence Kasumba, John Kani, Winston Duke, and Sterling K. Brown. This is just a short teaser, but it looks fantastic so far. I’m so excited for this! Dive in. ›››

Continue reading First Teaser Trailer for Ryan Coogler’s ‘Black Panther’ Movie for Marvel


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